Invisible Illness Awareness Week 2016: Our Voices Need to Be Heard
Never heard of Invisible Illness Awareness Week? You're not alone. Jody Smith sheds a little light to make it more visible
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Encouraging Response in Chronic Migraine to Eptinezumab

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by bertiedog, May 11, 2017.

  1. bertiedog

    bertiedog Senior Member

    Messages:
    909
    Likes:
    1,128
    South East England, UK
    Here is an article about a Phase II study on chronic migraine and Eptinezumba which looks for encouraging. I was wondering if this drug would be related to Rituximab? The article was in the latest newsletter of Medical News Today.

    Pam

    "Eptinezumab significantly decreases the impact of chronic migraine on daily functioning at weeks 4 through 12 following a single infusion, according to results reported at the 2017 American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting, held in Boston, MA.


    The drug eptinezumab significantly reduced the number of migraine days for patients with chronic migraine.

    The phase IIb study evaluated changes in scores on the Headache Impact Test-6 (HIT-6) from baseline to week 12 in chronic migraine (CM) patients achieving ≥75%, ≥50 percent, ≥25 percent, and <25 percent response rate (RR) following a single intravenous infusion of eptinezumab, 300 milligrams, 100 milligrams, 30 milligrams, or 10 milligrams, or placebo.

    The RR was measured as the reduction in migraine days per month.

    Dr. Richard Lipton, of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, and colleagues reported the findings.

    Eptinezumab, formerly called ALD403, is an investigational monoclonal antibody.

    The analysis included 588 adults with CM who were randomized to eptinezumab or placebo. All patients had headaches on ≥15 of every 28 days, including ≥5 migraine attacks and ≥8 migraine days.

    Subjects completed HIT-6 questionnaires at randomization and again at 4 and 12 weeks. HIT-6 provides a validated measure of headache impact on daily functioning through questions such as: "In the past 4 weeks, how often did headaches limit your ability to concentrate on work or daily activities?"

    Reduction in migraine days higher for eptinezumab-treated patients

    The primary endpoint was the percent of patients achieving a 75 percent reduction in migraine days per month from baseline to week 12.

    Significantly more patients achieved a ≥75 percent and ≥50 percent RR with 300 milligrams (33 percent and 57 percent) or 100 milligrams (31 percent and 55 percent) of eptinezumab than those with placebo (21 percent and 41 percent) for 12 weeks post-treatment.

    At randomization, HIT-6 scores averaged 64.5. HIT-6 scores for 75 percent responders receiving any study dose at week 4 were 50.9 (-13.6). Scores were sustained at 12 weeks at 52.2 (-12.3). HIT-6 scores for 50 percent responders were 57.1 at 4 weeks and 56.6 at 12 weeks. Minimal changes in HIT-6 scores were seen for ≥25 percent or <25 percent responders.

    All doses of eptinezumab were well tolerated, and no serious treatment-related adverse events were reported.

    "These data suggest that the response rates associated with eptinezumab treatment translate into reductions in headache impact as measured by HIT-6, reflecting improvement in function and quality of life," Dr. Lipton said."
     
    Hutan, merylg, Skycloud and 2 others like this.
  2. hixxy

    hixxy Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,102
    Likes:
    1,255
    Australia
    Same type of drug (monoclonal antibody) but completely different function.
     
    merylg, Esther12 and RogerBlack like this.
  3. edawg81

    edawg81

    Messages:
    96
    Likes:
    238
    Upstate, NY
    We in the migraine world referred to these drugs as CGRPs for short (although technically they are anti-CGRPs) and we have been waiting a long time. Before I had CFS/ME I had chronic migraines and was waiting for these drugs to be approved because they are so different than triptans. I thought migraines were my biggest/only problem (little did I know).

    I wonder what the impact to an ME/CFS patient will be with these drugs. I don't think is rituxan relatively safe compared to CGRPS only because CGRPs are safe. CGRPs do not impact the immune system, like B-cells, but do impact peptides that act as neurological signals (from my understanding). This makes CGRP drugs much safer and there is still a notable risks with rituxan.
     
    Hutan and merylg like this.
  4. bertiedog

    bertiedog Senior Member

    Messages:
    909
    Likes:
    1,128
    South East England, UK
    There was a migraine summit 2 weeks with some excellent speakers who were very excited about these drugs saying they should be available next year. They gave massive hope to severe migraine sufferers like myself.

    I thought I heard one of the specialists saying they had passed Phase III studies with very few side effects reported. They are given subcutaneously and I believe the drug is long acting, maybe monthly?

    I have had chronic migraine this year and its been horrendous at times so this gives me hope if an improvement that I have had this week fades away as has happened many times. Its early days but I have managed to stop taking one paracetamol with caffeine daily because of the likelihood it was causing rebound and there is no question that on the first day of stopping it I was craving it!

    It's only a week and I have had just one migraine attack which is a big improvement. Very low dose Lyrica has helped too but from listening to the summit it was obvious what a huge problem chronic migraine was in general and this included the rebound effect.

    Pam
     
    merylg likes this.
  5. bertiedog

    bertiedog Senior Member

    Messages:
    909
    Likes:
    1,128
    South East England, UK
    I have wondered this too because it was severe migraines with basilar attacks that completely disabled me that started up after the 2 weeks of flu from which I couldn't seem to recover in 1979. In between attacks I had good energy and this didn't change for me until about 1999 when I developed attacks of ME/CFS but the migraines have continued to be one the worst aspects of my health these days whereas my energy issues have improved a lot.

    Pam
     
    merylg and edawg81 like this.
  6. Skycloud

    Skycloud Senior Member

    Messages:
    287
    Likes:
    1,317
    UK
    @bertiedog - my daughter has severe basilar migraine, thanks for posting
     
  7. bertiedog

    bertiedog Senior Member

    Messages:
    909
    Likes:
    1,128
    South East England, UK
    I have had those too and they are completely disabling. Thankfully I don't get them very often now and they are milder, although the head pain that comes after can go on for days.

    Please tell her there is hope in the not too distant future.

    Pam
     
    Skycloud likes this.

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page