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Elevated heart rate lasting days after exertion

Discussion in 'Autonomic, Cardiovascular, and Respiratory' started by Valentijn, Jul 8, 2013.

  1. Valentijn

    Valentijn Activity Level: 3

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    I've been using a pulse oximeter to help in pacing and to see how I react to various activities and positions.

    It seems that after doing activities I consider moderate (such as 20 minutes picking strawberries while sitting down, then 10 minutes of tying back plants a few hours later) my resting heart rate goes up to about 110. Usually it's about 80 if I've been sticking to mild activities.

    This elevated "resting" heart rate seems to last for a couple days after the moderate activity, even if I then become mostly inactive. During that time, if my heart rate starts falling, my oxygen % also falls to the low 90's, sometimes the high 80's depending on my position.

    Any idea what biological dysfunction could cause this days-long elevated resting heart rate, such as in better understood disorders? I haven't been able to find anything useful on google.
     
  2. Shell

    Shell Senior Member

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    I have Inappropriate Sinus Tachycardia which is under the dysautonomic umbrella. The dx was based on a 24 hr holter ECG showing raised HR even at rest.
    Certain things will set my heart racing (doing the washing for example or cooking) to such a degree that I have to stop and sit down. But my at rest HR remains raised for days afterwards.
    I also have problems with SATS but I have some complicated lung issues. I get much more breathless when upright - orthostatic and my SATS drop when doing stuff.

    I don't know if that's any help? You could get the orthostatic side of things checked out. If your HR is raised even at rest that points more to IST than POTS (although even that isn't easy to say as I have the rise over 30 bpm thing too and some researchers think IST is a type of POTS)
     
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  3. SOC

    SOC Moderator and Senior Member

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    This used to happen to me, too. For me, it appears to have been a blood volume problem at the root, but I don't really know how it all works together to produce the long-lasting increased HR.

    For me, Florinef, electrolytes, and Verapamil (to control HR) has made a huge impact on that particular symptom. At the same time, I'm far more functional when my HR behaves more normally. So, I do more and my HR returns to normal within 10-15 mins of sitting with my feet up.
     
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  4. Little Bluestem

    Little Bluestem Senescent on the Illinois prairie, USA

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    Can you feel that your heart is beating faster? (I’m wondering if I should be checking my heart rate.)

    Since your oxygen % falls if your heart rate starts falling, it might not be a good idea to use a drug to control your heart rate.
     
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  5. Valentijn

    Valentijn Activity Level: 3

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    I usually don't notice it beating faster (I have low pulse-pressure/weak heart beat when this happens), but my pulse oximeter notices :p I take Strattera for OI, which increases my pulse pressure, meaning I can increase my circulation (and oxygenation) without raising my heart rate. But even with Strattera now I'm often struggling.
     
  6. Valentijn

    Valentijn Activity Level: 3

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    Thanks for the info ... maybe I can talk to the cardiologist about IST when I get in to see one. It does sound very much like what I have.
     
    Shell likes this.
  7. Valentijn

    Valentijn Activity Level: 3

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    Might be a good idea for me to get blood volume tested at some point. I think that's something the one real ME clinic in the country (private of course) tests for. But I can't take something that directly slows my heart rate, since it seems to be rising in direct reaction to dropping oxygen levels - but maybe the Florinef takes care of that.
     
    Shell likes this.
  8. Shell

    Shell Senior Member

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    Narrow pulse pressure is a good indicator of low blood volume. Wide pulse pressure tends to mean some kind of hardening or connective tissue mess up. I've had very high PP and already had a couple of TIAs (the last one being pretty bad). I would get yourself a good sphig.
     
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  9. SOC

    SOC Moderator and Senior Member

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    The first thing my specialist tried was the Florinef. My impression was that it is often sufficient on it's own. Currently, my daughter is taking Florinef, but not a HR modulator. I was given the Verapamil only after several months of Florinef helped my symptoms some, but the persisting tachy was still giving me trouble. So I'm guessing the Florinef alone might be a reasonable solution for you if you can tolerate it. Worth trying, anyway. :) I've heard of people getting regular IV saline to increase blood volume, but I have no idea if that is a standard treatment. No doc has suggested it to me so far.


    That's good information to know. Might help me judge the right amount of fluid intake -- if my PP is dropping, maybe I need more fluids.
     
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  10. physicsstudent13

    physicsstudent13 Senior Member

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    I tried to get catheterization to check for heart disease but haven't been able to get it. I'm thinking of going on lisinopril for my chest pain
     
  11. triffid113

    triffid113 Day of the Square Peg

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    Listen I am NOT A DOC and I know NOTHING about drugs nor sinus tachycardia. So I am only putting this out there for thought...I take 1g/day Olive Leaf Extract and it causes sinus bradycardia, which is safe, like the athletes have. I have had it for well at least since 2004 or 2006 when I had my penultimate EKG. I think this is a good thing but dunno what it does to %oxygen or whatever. If I had any sort of tachycardia (which I have had due to hyperthyroid) I would take magnesium in the citrate form (citrate to inhibit/prevent stones). The standard CBC with chem for electrolytes is not reflective of the magnesium level in the heart. Most Americans do NOT eat enough foods containing magnesium so if you think you eat the average American diet and should be ok, think again. I have all my life taken a cal-mag supplement (used to be 2:1 ratio, now 1:1 ratio is thought best) but I admit the reason was due to constant calcium deficiency due to the VDR genetic defect I have and inability to hang on to Vitamin D. So anyway except in the case of hyperthyroid I have always gotton more magnesium that you would suspect by my diet. When I was hyperthyroid I took magnesium for my heart but also some other things that the thyroid rips through, like carnitine. On ithyroid.com the author makes a case for copper deficiency being a cause of hyperthyroid (maybe THE cause) as it seems to be required to turn the thyroid off. It is easy to become copper deficient after menopause/andropause as our hormones help us absorb copper. You can check your copper status via www.evenbetternow.com for $100 which sends your hair swatch to www.traceelements.com for analysis. I don't remember which other elements you burn up when hyperthyroid, but I do know you can be deficient in both copper and zinc (zinc deficiency caused hypo thyroid) and have symptoms of both as I seemed to do. (Mine, however, was caused by too much iodine).
     
  12. physicsstudent13

    physicsstudent13 Senior Member

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    you see I could have a normal echo cardiogram according to the cardiologist but I still had palpitations and some chest pains, but I feel a lot better after coq10

    I'm low on magnesium and calcium and vitamin D- magnesium may help memory somehow and relaxes smooth muscle. my doctor friend is trying to raise his vitamin D to 90. Coq10 seems to work well and I have much less palpitations after taking higher doses of it
     
  13. Valentijn

    Valentijn Activity Level: 3

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    I take magnesium, copper, and vitamin D. I took Q10 in the past, but it didn't seem to much - however I do have a very rare version of an SNP on a gene involving Q10 production, so maybe I'll check into that again.

    Taking something causing bradycardia to lower heart rate while heart rate is elevated due to falling oxygen levels sounds like a great way to end up in the ER :p My thyroid tested as being pretty normal.
     
  14. physicsstudent13

    physicsstudent13 Senior Member

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    what causes bradycardia? maybe ubiquinol is better absorbable. magnesium helps with memory
    isn't copper a heavy metal that is toxic?
     
  15. Little Bluestem

    Little Bluestem Senescent on the Illinois prairie, USA

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    That depends on the dose. A certain amount is necessary for good health. Too much is toxic.
     
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  16. physicsstudent13

    physicsstudent13 Senior Member

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    how about adrenal thyroid glandulars, do those help lower heart rate? I think it was the coq10 that helped. I have high heart rate for some reason and chest pain like someone is poking my heart and palpitations
     
  17. triffid113

    triffid113 Day of the Square Peg

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    you need copper for cross linking of collagen...strength of skin (and blood vessels are skin), and cartilage. If you get crepey skin such as at the neck, that is copper deficiency. If you wound easily, such as the tendency t cut yourself while shaving, or have other reason to notice thin skin, you are copper deficient. If you have slow would healing you are zinc or copper deficient or both. it is possible (dunno but they SAY) that grey hair is caused by copper deficiency. In my case MOUSY hair (loss of hair color). I fixed crepey skin and slow wound healing with copper. I dye my hair so only my hairdresser knows if it's still mousy...
     
  18. physicsstudent13

    physicsstudent13 Senior Member

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    well I'd rather have my blood flow be better and not have so much clotting for heart disease perhaps
     
  19. physicsstudent13

    physicsstudent13 Senior Member

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    is ubiquinol have the same effect as coq10 but is better bio available and absorbable? I think I had great improvement on coq10, maybe because it increases oxygen to the heart and mitochondria?
     

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