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Elevated Gluten Antibodies Found in Children With Autism

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Waverunner, Jun 22, 2013.

  1. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

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    Elevated antibodies to gluten in children with autism but no increased rate of celiac disease. We could speculate, that gluten could have a bad influence on the human body, but doesn't show itself as inflammation of the gut or at least no form of inflammation we test for.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130620132144.htm

    June 20, 2013 Researchers have found elevated antibodies to gluten proteins of wheat in children with autism in comparison to those without autism. The results also indicated an association between the elevated antibodies and the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms in the affected children. They did not find any connection, however, between the elevated antibodies and celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder known to be triggered by gluten. The results were e-published in the journal PLOS ONE.

    Gluten, a group of more than 70 proteins in wheat and related grains, consists of gliadins and glutenins. Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder that negatively affects communication and social interaction. Although the mechanisms that cause autism are poorly understood, there is mounting evidence that the immune system plays a role in a subset of patients. In addition, autistic children commonly have gastrointestinal symptoms. In recent years, diets that exclude gluten have become increasingly popular in the autism community. The effectiveness of such diets, however, has not been confirmed in controlled and blinded studies.
    The study, headed by Armin Alaedini, PhD, assistant professor of medical sciences (in the Department of Medicine and the Institute of Human Nutrition) at Columbia University Medical Center, looked at blood samples and medical records of 140 children. Thirty-seven of the children were diagnosed with autism and the rest were unaffected siblings or healthy control subjects. To increase diagnostic accuracy, only patients identified as having autism according to two well-recognized diagnostic instruments, the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule and the Autism Diagnostic Interview, Revised, were selected. The blood samples were tested for antibodies to tissue transglutaminase, a sensitive and specific marker of celiac disease, as well as antibodies to gliadin. The patients also were tested for genes encoding certain human leukocyte antigens, which are strongly associated with celiac disease.
    "This is the first study to systematically look at serologic and genetic markers of celiac disease and gluten sensitivity in such well-characterized cohorts of autism patients and controls," said Peter H. R. Green, MD, director of the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University Medical Center and one of the study authors. "But the findings need to be confirmed in larger cohorts."
    The authors suggest that further research is needed to understand the relevance of the described antibodies in autism. "The IgG antibody response to gluten does not necessarily indicate sensitivity to gluten or any disease-causing role for the antibodies in the context of autism," said Dr. Alaedini. "But the higher levels of antibody to gluten and their association with gastrointestinal symptoms point to immunologic and/or intestinal permeability abnormalities in the affected children." Dr. Alaedini noted that a better understanding of the immune response to gluten may yield novel clues about autism or offer biomarkers to identify a subset of patients that would respond to certain treatment strategies.
     
  2. xchocoholic

    xchocoholic Senior Member

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    This news is old news to those in the Dan community. I produce
    high amounts of antibodies to tiny amounts of gluten. X
     
  3. natasa778

    natasa778 Senior Member

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    If confirmed this will be very significant in terms of clinical trails and individualised treatments ...

    Also (not disease-specific):


    http://issuu.com/treatingautism/docs/medical_comorbidities_in_autism_spectrum_disorders
     
    Waverunner, Sasha and Bob like this.
  4. Shell

    Shell Senior Member

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    I think the reason so few people with gluten probs don't get a dx of celiac is because they never get a biopsy. The blood test is well known to be less than reliable.
    My dd was tested neg for celiacs and yet when I ignored the test and made her gluten free she has never been readmitted to hospital since.
    I know gluten wasn't the primary issue with her as she had plenty of serious admissions well before I weaned her, but gluten has definitely played a role in how sick she was.
    Also in my work with children with austism - many of them had gut problems that were never diagnosed as anything.
     
  5. Marco

    Marco Old blackguard

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    Very interesting.

    Who would have thought that gluten proteins were homologous to many neurotransmitter proteins and that the immune response to gluten might also interfere with normal neurotransmission :

    Evidence for gliadin antibodies as causative agents in schizophrenia.




    http://www.polygenicpathways.co.uk/gliadinschiz.htm
     
  6. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

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    Marco: Thanks for posting this. What makes me really angry is, that most doctors don't know anything about anything. Nobody seems to care about all the new findings that were made, so it's the patient who has to care for himself but in the end doesn't have many alternatives because treatment options are limited in most cases.
     
  7. Marco

    Marco Old blackguard

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    What interested (or concerned) me most in that paper was that the results of gene expression studies may result from the activity of viral or plant based homologues rather than 'defects' in the the endogenous genes. Genes don't discriminate whether the DNA/protein is human, viral or plant based - after all mitochondria are an evolutionary blend of bacterial, plant and animal derived functions within one organelle.

    Most doctors just want to write a script and get you out the door before the next patient arrives.
     
    Waverunner likes this.

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