The power and pitfalls of omics part 2: epigenomics, transcriptomics and ME/CFS
Simon McGrath concludes his blog about the remarkable Prof George Davey Smith's smart ideas for understanding diseases, which may soon be applied to ME/CFS.
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Elevated Energy Production in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by A.B., Oct 18, 2016.

  1. wastwater

    wastwater Senior Member

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    This hyper/hypo energy production study on corts site deserves its own thread
    Does it help explain PEM as well,if the energy production cycle is revved up just to put out minimal energy then when higher demand is placed on it,the demand cannot be met.
    As a side note FOXO genes are considered tumour surpressors
     
    TreePerson and Ritto like this.
  2. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    It does, and this thread is it!
     
  3. Leopardtail

    Leopardtail Senior Member

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    Great post Hip!!

    You have summarised my first resonse to the article (that these cells were out of the normal serum environment).

    I did not immediately consider metabolic blockings factors - though that is a good point well made.

    I did however consider the general metabolic support available in serum. Things like fuel availability (Glucose or Fatty Acids) levels of Vitamins, Minerals, Amino Acids, Catechols, Cortisol and Thryoid hormones. All of these things will affect cellular performance. The chemical baths used to grow these cells will more than likely have optimsed all relevant items and will not have reflected the situation in the patients own serum.
     
    trishrhymes and Hip like this.

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