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Effectiveness of dance in patients with fibromyalgia: a randomized, single-blind, controlled study.

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia' started by LivingwithFibro, Apr 10, 2015.

  1. LivingwithFibro

    LivingwithFibro Lily

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    Abstract
    OBJECTIVES:
    The aim of the present study was to assess the effectiveness of belly dance as a treatment option for patients with fibromyalgia.

    METHODS:
    Eighty female patients with fibromyalgia between 18 to 65 years were randomly allocated to a dance group (n=40) and control group (n=40). Patients in the dance group underwent 16 weeks of belly dance twice a week, while the patients in the control group remained on a waiting list. The patients were evaluated with regard to pain (VAS), function (6MWT), quality of life (FIQ and SF-36), depression (Beck Inventory), anxiety (STAI) and self-image (BDDE). Evaluations were carried out at baseline, 16 weeks and 32 weeks by a blinded assessor.

    RESULTS:
    The dance group achieved significant improvements in VAS for pain (p<0.001), six-minute walk test (p<0.001), FIQ (p=0.003), BDDE (p<0.009) as well as the pain (p<0.001), emotional aspects (p<0.003) and mental health (p<0.021) subscales on the SF-36.

    CONCLUSIONS:
    Belly dance can be used in the treatment of fibromyalgia to reduce pain and improve functional capacity, quality of life and self-image.

    From here.


    Has anyone here tried bellydance?
     
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  2. shannah

    shannah Senior Member

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    I've tried watching it! :)

    Only for a few minutes though - too exhausting!!!
     
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  3. LivingwithFibro

    LivingwithFibro Lily

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    Haha :D

    It's not as hard as it looks! It's very relaxing and some of the moves are similar to Qi Gong.
     
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  4. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

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    Sounds more fun than most of these 'treatments'!

    ...unfortunately, this sort of medicalisation can lead to patients doing things like this when they don't really want to, just because they want to get better. That's not so fun.
     
  5. SOC

    SOC

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    Maybe if I had fibro instead of ME, I might try belly dance.... or yoga, or tai chi, or walking, or.... But since I have ME, I use my limited energy for activities of daily living. Maybe if I get to the point where I can shower, put in a full day's work, grocery shop, and do one other activity outside the house all in one day, I'll consider dancing. Until then, I'm working on increasing my ability to do activities of daily living as I have more energy. Function first!
     
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  6. Misfit Toy

    Misfit Toy Senior Member

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    I used to belly dance. I was part of a troupe where I live and I taught it. It is very hard on fibro and especially joints. You are moving and shaking pelvis and hips constantly. I can no longer do it, or I do it sparingly.

    I don't understand this being good for fibro at all. It's constant movement and quick. Belly, hips, arms and head. I am very ambidextrous.

    To be honest, I think it's one reason I have a herniated disc. You do snapping motions a lot. It's a workout and then some. Of course, you can go slow, but that's not as fun!

    I have all the garb. I so miss it! So much fun.

    Btw, clarification about fibro...many with fibro are also EXHAUSTED. It's not limited to ME.
     
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  7. LivingwithFibro

    LivingwithFibro Lily

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    Absolutely agree, fibro can be very exhausting... most days I do not have the energy to tie my hair.

    Hmm, I know a lady in the U.S who teaches Fibro patients, they go super slow and are stuck on the beginner level but it truly helps them.
     
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  8. SOC

    SOC

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    I suppose that's because (theoretically) exercise is good for fibro patients even though it's bad for PWME. Although fibro can be very exhausting, PEM is not a feature; therefore, exercise is likely to improve the fatigue through improved circulation, improvement in OI, and so on.

    Patients with fibro and ME have the same exercise limitations as other PWME, of course.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2015
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  9. CantThink

    CantThink Senior Member

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    I think classes adapted to the limitations of the patients are more likely to work. As in, classes specifically for people with chronic illnesses, and that don't include healthy people.

    There was (probably still is) a yoga class in my area for people with M.E. - it was adapted and had a big relaxation/meditation component. I think it was quite different to a regular healthy person class. From memory I think it was run by a physio. There was also a tai chi class for elderly people that my friend who is not elderly, but has CFS, went to and could manage. My friend is at perhaps 70 to 80% ability. She had a cleaner... So I guess some of her cleaning energy went on the class!

    I have another friend who has fibro and hypoT. She finds swimming helpful as it is less straining on her joints than impact/weight bearing exercise.
     
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  10. SOC

    SOC

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    My problem with classes has been duration. My specialist recommends (for me) exercising about 5 minutes at a time based on my CPET test -- I went anaerobic in less than 6 minutes. I don't think my CPET results were grossly worse than most PWME. It doesn't matter how gentle the class is, I can't (or couldn't, things have changed a lot in the past year) produce energy fast enough to maintain even gentle exercise for half an hour.

    Several years ago a dear friend of mine arranged a private yoga class for the two of us and our daughters, theoretically designed around my health limitations. All the exercises were gentle, and in lying positions with plenty of rest between sets. I couldn't even do that. I had PEM after every class. The combination of getting to and from class and 30 minutes of even very gentle exercise was more than my body could manage at the time.

    I might be able to manage a class of that sort today if a had a cleaner and a shopper, and didn't have to work to support myself. :p
     
  11. LivingwithFibro

    LivingwithFibro Lily

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    I hear you on that bit!

    Showering, tying my hair, cooking, walking, sitting, cleaning, trying to look human, trying not to fall around the house, working takes most of my energy.

    Maybe if I could marry a super rich Arab Sheikh :p
     
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  12. CantThink

    CantThink Senior Member

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    LOL she had exactly that set-up (last paragraph) ;).

    I agree - while I was typing it, I was thinking hmmm how on earth can one manage a class for that long that is physical. Even in my better periods when I was a lot more functional than I currently am, I struggled to manage a sit down academic class and had to go to bed when I got back. My dream after being able to work, was to 'get fit' but my two attempts during my then good period - going to the ice rink once, and trying to attend an exercise class (in which I fell over/collapsed on the ground = mortifying:whistle:) were complete failures. These days the idea of having to be 'physical' for so long seems at odds with how I am. Now that I am older (and hopefully a bit wiser) I would always put my efforts, if I get improvements, into existing (the day to day chores & self-care) and then work/career/business, as really they would serve me a lot better than exercising would.

    Having said that, I do wonder if there are people who are in the recovery 'phase' who could perhaps manage something like those classes and not be damaged by them... Another friend of mine did one of those Couch to 5K programs when she was 'recovering' from M.E. - she was working part time at the time, and aiming for full time (which she is now doing).
     
  13. SOC

    SOC

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    I can imagine the day when I can work to support myself and do all my ADLs without difficulty and be able to do exercise classes to rebuild my strength. I would consider that a recovery phase.

    Right now I'm greatly improved, but I wouldn't say I'm in remission and ready to recover my pre-illness strength and agility. I still have afternoons or evenings in bed after having overdone physically out of necessity. It wouldn't make sense to do that to myself if it's not necessary.

    That said, I think it's possible for some of us who are not in recovery to do very, very short duration (<5 mins) gentle exercise to try to maintain some strength and flexibility. It does not appear to me that increasing that exercise in either time or effort (GET) would improve functional ability much or change the course of the illness. I'd say it is, at best, maintaining limited function or slowing down the loss of strength and flexibility.
     
  14. Kati

    Kati Patient in training

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    Exchange fibromyalgia for HIV, Hep C, stomach ulcers and multiple sclerosis, and see how their respective researchers react to this trial using belly dancing.

    Unbelievable.

    what I want to know is who actually funded this study?
     
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  15. jimells

    jimells Senior Member

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    I wonder why we spend billions on medical research when we already have the cure for nearly every illness: Diet, exercise, sleep, and stop smoking tobacco.
     
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  16. CantThink

    CantThink Senior Member

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    Yes, I agree.
     
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  17. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Hibernating

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    If I could do a one hour dance class twice a week, I'd probably consider myself cured already...
     
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  18. worldbackwards

    worldbackwards A unique snowflake

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    Perhaps we need interpretive mime for ME? Just a thought...
     
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  19. August59

    August59 Daughters High School Graduation

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    I would be happy walking 75 yards to my mailbox everyday!
     
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  20. mermaid

    mermaid Senior Member

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    In the 10 yrs since I started ME I have been in and out of a local dance/theatre group which is for disabled people (though only one other has ME). Unfortunately I am less functional than I was when I started, though some of it is probably age related too as my knees are going a bit at aged 62.The dance style is loose and free, and there are no learnt steps as we have many with learning disability in the group.

    It's a 3 hr rehearsal (!!!) but I don't go for that, and tend to go just for the last hour now. Luckily we are not up on our feet dancing all the time, but watching each other, or I can sit on the floor and gently move if it's a bad day or sit things out. The woman who leads us knows a lot about ME as she has a daughter with it, and a husband, so she is happy for me to just do what I can or want to on the day.

    Admittedly I do get PEM and pain after the group though the amount varies depending on how I am at the time. I so love the dance part though, that it's worth going even if I only do a small amount. I often miss the group as I am too ill to go, but it's great to be able to go sometimes, and I am lucky that the rehearsal is in the village hall down the road from me, otherwise it would be impossible.

    Interestingly, I did try out an over 50s group of dance, thinking it would be gentler than my dance/theatre group, but it was full on for 2 hrs and after 2 attempts I gave it up as a bad job.
     

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