Phoenix Rising: The Gift That Keeps on Giving All Year Long
This holiday season Jody Smith turns her eyes to the people of Phoenix Rising and gives thanks for you all ...
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Effect of a physical activity intervention on bias in self-reported activity (gen)

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Dolphin, Aug 2, 2011.

  1. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,680
    Likes:
    28,198
    Given that Graded Exercise Therapy and GET/GAT-based CBT often use self-report tools to measure activity/check for improvements, this trial is very interesting. I had previously hypothesised it could be an issue but it is useful to have some empirical evidence for it.

    Free full text at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2746093/?tool=pubmed

    It talks about other studies but I'm not sure how much time I'll have to read them.
     
  2. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Hibernating

    Messages:
    4,615
    Likes:
    12,452
    South Australia
    Interesting. Thanks Dolphin.
     
  3. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

    Messages:
    8,449
    Likes:
    28,523
    Thanks again.
     
  4. oceanblue

    oceanblue Guest

    Messages:
    1,174
    Likes:
    362
    UK
    Thanks, Dolphin.

    Initially, I thought this looked like the smoking gun, and it makes some great points like
    But after reading it I'm less sure:

    1. The putative over-reporting made no difference to the result of the trial
    2. The basic data looks suspect. The key thing is the correlation between the Self-Report measure 3DPAR and actometers. Here are the correlations:
    Control: baseline=0.14; follow-up=0.30
    Intervention: baseline=0.21; follow-up=0.20

    - First thing to note is that earlier work showed the correlation between actometers and 3DPAR should be in the range 0.28-0.46 and all but the control follow-up are significantly below that range and showing very weak correlations. Something looks wrong here, and that makes me concerned about the findings.
    - Also, the correlation doesn't change in the intervention group between baseline and follow-up (ie participants aren't more likely to over-report activity after the intervention). It's the change in the control group that makes the intervention results important.
    - The baseline and follow-up data are not for the same individuals: the study used separate samples for baseline and follow-up, so some of the difference found may be because they are looking at different people with different tendencies to over/under report.

    Sorry to pour cold water on this - I'm disappointed too.

    To be honest, i don't fully understand the analysis they present in figs 1 & 2, which appears more powerful, but the 2 concerns listed above makes me doubt this study. Happy to be put right, though.

    My main thought, though, reading this, is that self-report of physical activity is highly questionable (regardless of social desirability/over reporting). Those correlations with the actometer are terrible (and actometers themselves are imperfect measures of activity). Goes to show, it's not just CFS research that's hopelessly flaky at times.

    Will check out the references in this paper as there does seem to be some interesting discussions going on.
     
    Esther12 likes this.
  5. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,680
    Likes:
    28,198
    Thanks for replying. Just a quick reply - have a phone call in a while to prepare for.

    The figures are important. They show where the over-reporting is (the gaps between the two lines). The over-reporting didn't take place throughout the sample - not at the low levels of moderate to vigorous activity levels and at the low levels of vigorous activity levels - which is why it may not make a difference a difference to the overall figures.

    I have read quite a lot of papers in this area in the last week. While the correlations of actometers with calorimetry and double-labelled water aren't in the 0.8s and 0.9s (IIRC), it has generally been considered a good objective measure. Self-reports have all sorts of problems with much lower correlations. There are quite a range of actometers e.g. some can move in three dimensions which is better for some sorts of activities. Also the positioning can be an issue e.g. IIRC, waist is better than ankle.

    I haven't read the associated paper so far but a quick look suggests if they had just gone by the subjective measures, the intervention would have been portrayed as some sort of success http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2275165/pdf/nihms41002.pdf
     
  6. oceanblue

    oceanblue Guest

    Messages:
    1,174
    Likes:
    362
    UK
    Interesting that the original paper claims some improvement while this paper, using the same data, says there was no significant overall improvement according to accelerometry or self-report!

    I'd be interested to see anything you come across that validates actometers in free-living (as opposed to lab) conditions, since that's the relevant comparison in these trials. In any event, they seem to be way ahead of self-report measures. I can't believe the general complacency about the short-comings of self-report measures.
     
  7. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,680
    Likes:
    28,198
    I've read it now. The original paper in effect refers to two trials: one that ended in 2005 where the girls got the program for 7th and 8th grade (the preplanned trial) and then an addition they did where other girls got the program in 6th and 7th grade and then a cheaper follow-up program was performed in 8th grade. There was no difference for the program that just did 7th and 8th grades - the improvement was only see in the program for 6th, 7th and 8th grades.

    The papers that talked about motion sensors/actometers were review papers rather than individual trials. They were papers referenced in this paper e.g. Shephard. So I'm afraid I can't help much with details.
     

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page