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EBV - Study reveals how a cancer-causing virus blocks human immune response

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Bob, Jan 27, 2015.

  1. Bob

    Bob

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    Study reveals how a cancer-causing virus blocks human immune response
    26 Jan 2015
    University of Texas at Austin
    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2015-01/uota-srh012115.php

    Continue reading:
    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2015-01/uota-srh012115.php
     
    August59, NK17, heapsreal and 5 others like this.
  2. Marky90

    Marky90 Science breeds knowledge, opinion breeds ignorance

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    Nature is crazy.. :woot:
     
  3. lansbergen

    lansbergen Senior Member

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    Viruses try anything to win.
     
    Marky90 likes this.
  4. Antares in NYC

    Antares in NYC Senior Member

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    Fascinating study.
    I find it interesting that this mechanism is shared by several herpes viruses, so I can imagine that if you have EBV, HHV6 and HVS1, your immune system is getting pummeled and your interferon response rendered completely useless by their combination of immune-disabling RNA. Imagine that!

    Also, I was reading recently that the Lyme bacterium Borrelia also uses a similar immune evasion strategy.
     
    Woolie likes this.
  5. Woolie

    Woolie Gone now, hope to see you all again soon somewhere

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    From the article: "...several herpes viruses that block a component of a human's innate immune system called the interferon response".

    What's interesting about herpes viruses is that a few of their actions seem to be antiinflammatory. Which is weird because if these latent herpes viruses were a major factor contributing to ME, why do we feel so inflamed all the time?

    Another one I've heard of are Interleukin-10. The virus produces a fake version of this antiinflammatory cytokine.

    It makes sense, I suppose, why would a virus want to create inflammation? It wants to do the opposite, to prevent its chances of being attacked by the immune system. But whatever role these substances play in ME, its not at all straightforward.

    If latent herpes viruses are a factor in some cases of ME, I wonder whether perhaps our problem might be the opposite. Rather than immune system evasion, our immune systems remain on high alert and are actively trying to eradicate latent infection whenever it reveals itself. Hence the massive immune responses to a triggering event as small as a little overexertion. This would also explain the exhaustion of the pools EBV-responsive B and T cells reported in that recent PlosONE paper.
     
    cigana, Antares in NYC and Bob like this.
  6. Tired of being sick

    Tired of being sick Senior Member

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    ...
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2015
  7. Tired of being sick

    Tired of being sick Senior Member

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    Sorry for the Debbie Downer post above..

    I was feeling very low that day........
     
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  8. Bob

    Bob

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    No need to apologise. :) I began a reply to you but didn't know what to say. :hug: Glad to hear that it was low day for you, and not every day.
     
    Tired of being sick and Woolie like this.
  9. natasa778

    natasa778 Senior Member

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    Also fits in nicely with the Cell Danger Response theory of diseases
     
    Woolie likes this.
  10. Woolie

    Woolie Gone now, hope to see you all again soon somewhere

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    This is fascinating, @natasa778, I've never some across this before! Am struggling to read it today, but look forward to having a go on a better day.
     
    natasa778 likes this.
  11. natasa778

    natasa778 Senior Member

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    The theory is not that new - well at least Naviaux has been at it for a while - but it has caught wind recently with successful suramin experiments in two different mouse models ... Def something to keep an eye on. The biggest downside, apart from the theory having been demonstrated only in animal models so far, is that suramin is riddled with serious side effects and there are no other purinergic antagonists out there. So even if the upcoming human 'proof of concept' trial is successful it will be years until safer alternatives are developed, if ever.
     

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