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Dr Singh's XMRV Patents: Something for Dr Lipkin -and the NY Times- to chew on

Discussion in 'XMRV Research and Replication Studies' started by parvofighter, Nov 23, 2010.

  1. eric_s

    eric_s Senior Member

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    Switzerland/Spain (Valencia)
    I think in one of the studies that were presented at the 1st Int'l XMRV workshop they studied people from one of the "famous" outbreaks and there was some info on how their health developped. I'm not sure anymore though. Right now i can't look it up, because i have to go.

    If you scroll down on this page there are links that should lead to the infos about that study
    http://www.facebook.com/notes/the-c...-1st-international-xmrv-workshop/479517330538
  2. redo

    redo Senior Member

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    This makes sense. Mikovits have found XMRV in CFS and MS, two very related conditions (the findings in the latter isn't published yet).

    There are no good data on CFS prevalence (that I know of). But when you look at MS prevalence, it's in the same areas as there is much breast cancer.
    "Significant correlations also exist with other diseases: on the state level, the correlation between MS and breast cancer is 0.330, and between MS and ALS (Motor Neuron Disease used in this study), the value is 0.618. (link) "

    The other retrovirus HLTV-I can cause leukemia. I don't see why XMRV couldn't be involved in other cancers... (such as breast cancer, lymphoma, prostate cancer)
  3. TheMoonIsBlue

    TheMoonIsBlue Senior Member

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    Hi Eric_S- I don't have a facebook account (yeah, just can't handle any more computer stuff than I already do) so I can't view it. If possible to post it on the boards I'd appreciate it. If not, don't worry about it :)

    Thanks!
  4. eric_s

    eric_s Senior Member

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    You don't need a facebook account to view those pages. But i tried to look it up now. Unfortunately, it does not say very much. It's abstract O_11 and can be found here.

    They say that they studied 3 groups of 10 people each. Group 1 was "severe CFS", group 2 "recovered from CFS" and group 3 healthy controls. In group 1, one person was part of the "Lyndonville outbreak" and in group 2 it was 7 persons. Unfortunately this does not allow for any percentages. At least it shows that some persons of that cohort today consider themselves recovered.
    What i also found interesting, don't know if it's a coincidence though, was that in group 1 (severe) M:F ratio was 2:8 and in group 2 (recovered) 6:4.

    I think there is some more about patients of Dr. Bell who now consider themselves recovered in one of his newsletters of this year. But i don't know if there are any percentages there.
  5. usedtobeperkytina

    usedtobeperkytina Senior Member

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    George, MCWPA is going to get this out to the public.

    Tina
  6. usedtobeperkytina

    usedtobeperkytina Senior Member

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    likely most of people who donated to science are poor. Gets you burial. Maybe homeless.
  7. usedtobeperkytina

    usedtobeperkytina Senior Member

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    Has anyone called the breast cancer folks? Surely they would be interested. Need more on our team. We have room for some pink ribbons, huh?

    My mother had aggressive breast cancer in late 40s. It was growing so fast that she saw a visual change in it every day. Felt it on Sunday night, it was removed that Friday. It was not estrogen sensitive. The fact it grew so quickly was a blessing because the tumor was found before the individual cells had time to fluff off and set up shop in the lungs, brain or bone. But nine months of chemo, six weeks of radiation, surgery and she is cured. Literally, been 15 years now.

    I am helping Andrea Pring in building up the MCWPA website for the ad. I think we need a place that gives a quick list by disease of percentages of XMRV findings.

    Tina
  8. carolwxyz99

    carolwxyz99 Senior Member

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    Regarding the comments on breast cancer and fatigue.

    I got breast cancer after having ME/CFS for around 15 years. I was more tired for quite a few months after having a cancer op. I did not have chemo or radiotherapy, and was told by my docs that the cancer could be making me more tired - I got the impression that one did not need to have chemo or radiotherapy to make one tired. I personally put it down to the appendicitis I got 2 months before the cancer, though, as that really whacked me out and I had not recovered before I had the cancer op.

    I was estrogen positive and I also had lindane and nickel probs which are carcinogenic and estrogenic.
  9. carolwxyz99

    carolwxyz99 Senior Member

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    Just to add to this after thinking more about it - people with cancer can be toxic, and can have leaky cells, sticky red blood cells and can have mitochondrial dysfunction - so there could be loads of reasons why people with cancer can get fatigued.

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