When the 'Holiday Season' Is No Holiday at all for Those With ME/CFS
Is December getting to you? Jody Smith shares some thoughts on some of the struggles that all too often attend this time of year ...
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Dr. Kerr, I presume?

Discussion in 'Phoenix Rising Articles' started by Phoenix Rising Team, Oct 15, 2014.

  1. jimells

    jimells Senior Member

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    Gawd, I sure hope my neighbors don't find out about this. For sure they'll find a way to extract it. Instead of cooking meth they'll be cooking yogurt! :jaw-drop:
     
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  2. jimells

    jimells Senior Member

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    I'm pretty sure that "fermentability" in this context means the bacteria are eating the unabsorbed carbohydrates.
     
  3. Roy S

    Roy S former DC ME/CFS lobbyist

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    Dr. Kerr stated "ME/CFS can be cured and that has been shown."?

    I'd like to know how and where.
     
    That said, I'm also glad to hear that Dr. Kerr is okay.
     
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  4. thegodofpleasure

    thegodofpleasure Player in a Greek Tragedy

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    Dr Kerr said:
    "Around the same time, Judy Mikovits and I were awarded $2 million from NIH to study biological aspects of CFS in the UK and USA. I resigned from this grant because of the increasing controversy surrounding XMRV, and the fact that my lab could not detect XMRV in any CFS patient.

    Judy’s lab found it in a majority of patients, including samples which we found to be repeatedly negative, using the identical PCR primers, while she was actually offering the same test privately."

    I would just like to correct him on the last point. My understanding of the situation is that it was Dr. Vincent Lombardi who was responsible for the test to which he refers. Dr. Mikovits had nothing to do with the XMRV test that was being sold privately via the Whittemore's commercial Lab, VIPdx. Furthermore, because she challenged the Whittemores about continuing to offer that unvalidated test, her relationship with them rapidly deteriorated and she lost her job very soon afterwards.

    I expect that all will be revealed when her book is published next month.
     
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  5. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6?

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    Yes, we need sugar - or alternatively lactate - to power the brain, and the muscles, and the nerves, and everything else. But we make sugar (and lactate) from other foods. We don't actually need to consume it.

    I would agree that very-low-carb diets are probably unhealthy. Even people with a high meat/fat diet like the Inuit consume berries as well as animal products. And they have a high omega-3 intake.

    I have never heard of the claimed opioid content of dairy foods. Do you have a link for this?

    I also agree that it is better to get starch from starchy veg than from grains, but I eschew the word 'superfood' as I think it's probably generally inaccurate and tends to be used when a food becomes faddish, often to be discarded in favour of the next 'superfood'. Some foods are undoubtedly healthier than others, of course.

    I don't know if you have read any of the 'Resistant Starch' threads. They are interesting and informative.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2014
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  6. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6?

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    They can do - see this paper.
     
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  7. JalapenoLuv

    JalapenoLuv

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    They can't because they are already digested in the small intestine. Digestion time is about 20 minutes for starch. Bacteria can't eat what isn't there. What is there is fat and fiber.

    Two different categories of bacteria eat this and a persons diet determines what their composition is. People that eat abundant vegetables have healthy bacteria that promote weight loss. People that eat a lot of meat have unhealthy bacteria that are associated with weight gain.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2014
  8. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6?

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    I am guessing that you have not read the scientific paper I linked to. It describes situations in which gut bacteria can encounter and ferment sugars, and the consequences of this.
     
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  9. JalapenoLuv

    JalapenoLuv

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    No I didn't. Figure 3 of your reference shows how the system is supposed to work. It's obvious that if someone eats too much starch and sugars, especially if they are fructose intolerant and overdo the fructose then it will enter the colon. However this would be an abnormal situation and is correctable.

    i guess I should have said "colonic bacteria aren't supposed to be eating starch and sugars." The point is that some people seem to be saying that a moderate amount of them is unhealthy and this isn't true. Glucose is the the preferred fuel for the brain, not ketones, so glucose sources like vegetables and some starch are essential nutrients to be healthy. Eating within the tolerance of a person's body will not see carbohydrates and sugars entering the colon.
     
  10. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6?

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    As I said, we can make glucose from other things. I elaborate a little on the subject here.

    I do agree that we should eat vegetables. I don't advocate a very-low carb diet.
     
  11. jimells

    jimells Senior Member

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    You know how to fix my gut, as opposed to treating the symptoms?


    Some people seem to have an extremely low tolerance. I never had a problem with carbohydrates until an horrible bout of food borne illness followed by whatever this illness is.

     
  12. JalapenoLuv

    JalapenoLuv

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    So he's just calling lactose and fructose FODMAPS. So he's diagnosing lactose and fructose malabsorption and restricting intake. Nothing earth shattering there.
     
  13. Ernie

    Ernie

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    Dr. Kerr is mistaken: here are those responsible for setting up the testing at VIPdx and who ran the lab. The money went into WP bio. The research lab was fully funded by grants so where did the money go once VIPdx proceeds were sent to WP bio?And also remember that Vipdx was privately owned by the Whittemore's and Lombardi cofounded.

    Comment from the CEO of WPI: “Our mission at WPI is to discover bio markers of disease and translate those discoveries into accurate diagnostics and effective treatments for patients,” said WPI Founder and President Annette Whittemore. “We continue to talk to other clinical laboratory companies, both nationally and internationally, in order to make the test available to a wider audience.”

    The Whittemore family put their interest in VIP Dx into a trust. Dr. Vincent Lombardi, is providing technical assistance and oversight of the VIP Dx testing. In exchange for the non-exclusive license. WPI (also owned by the whittemores ) has licensed the latest version of the test to Viral Immune Pathways Diagnostic Laboratories (VIP Dx) in Reno, Nev. (which they also owned privately and made decisions for both companies.

    Now remember Lombardi was in charge the whole time for VIPdx testing as you see here:

    In response to an overwhelming request for a diagnostic test for XMRV, WPI has temporarily agreed to allow Viral Immune Pathology Diagnostics (VIP Dx, at www.vipdx.com) [That is, VIP Dx, formerly RedLabs USA, indicates it has licensed the XMRV test technology.]
     
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  14. ClarkEllis

    ClarkEllis

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    Although most of what a healthy person eats is digested in the small intestine, a small but significant amount, including starch, does escape small intestine digestion and ends up in the colon. This includes standard starches but additionally there is 'resistant starch' which always end up in the colon, hence it's name. And bacteria in your colon do ferment these.
     
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  15. ClarkEllis

    ClarkEllis

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  16. shahida

    shahida Senior Member

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    re. soaking grains when do you soak them eg. brown rice is it whilst raw?
    and you cant soak pasta can you or it;ll go soggy?
    and it there science behing this or is it more 'theory'?
     
  17. Research 1st

    Research 1st Severe ME, POTS & MCAS.

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    ''Dr Kerr I presume''.
    That's a very witty headline!

    What happened to Dr Kerr was a little less witty though. It baffles me how one is at the top of their game one minute and then is removed from their post the next. Dr Kerr ends up in Colombia. Colombia?! Sounds a little far from Tooting and St George's NHS!

    Is this plot from a movie. If only we could all press rewind. I miss Dr Kerr's research and talks helping out the patient community and giving them hope.

    I wonder what Dr Kerr's cure was he once spoke about? Gene treatments perhaps?
     
  18. anniekim

    anniekim Senior Member

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    @ClarkEllis as he said this straight after talking about his view that diet is important, I thought he was saying diet can cure M.E. Had I read this wrongly? Many thanks
     
  19. JaimeS

    JaimeS Senior Member

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    It's not an uncommon view. When I took Nutrition, one of the texts assigned was heavily in favor of going back to the fats we ate historically, which certainly included animal fats. It's a school of thought, which you may or may not agree with, but he's certainly not the first to espouse it.

    Plus, he could be a fireman or a librarian, and that doesn't make his ideas automatically valid or invalid.

    -J
     
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  20. JaimeS

    JaimeS Senior Member

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    I would go!

    -J
     
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