The 12th Invest in ME Conference, Part 1
OverTheHills presents the first article in a series of three about the recent 12th Invest In ME international Conference (IIMEC12) in London.
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Dr. Horowitz on Chronic Lyme

Discussion in 'Lyme Disease and Co-Infections' started by Helen, Apr 5, 2016.

  1. Helen

    Helen Senior Member

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  2. duncan

    duncan Senior Member

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    He knows his stuff.

    I wonder what the name of his last book is. Or his new one. Or his website.
     
  3. medfeb

    medfeb Senior Member

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  4. duncan

    duncan Senior Member

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    Thank you, @medfeb.

    If you listen close enough, you can pick up the names several times. He is very helpful that way. :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2016
  5. Antares in NYC

    Antares in NYC Senior Member

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    What? Dr. Horowitz pushing his books and website?
    You don't say! (clutching pearls)
    :rolleyes:

    The guy knows his stuff, but boy is he a persistent self-promoter. While this is something I don't personally like about him, I have to say it has gone a long way to inform the public about Lyme, TBDs and CFIDS.

    The fact that his book has remained a NYT best seller for so long goes to show you that patients and relatives of those affected think precious little about the official CDC stance on Lyme. When extremely ill people are told "we can't do anything for you" with a shrug by their doctors, they'll find solutions somewhere else. The official Lyme guidelines have left a gap in care the size of the Hoover Dam.

    PS: not to be sardonic, but that's the same dynamic that applied to the victims of the infamous Tuskegee experiments (carried out with your tax dollars and only terminated in the mid-70s). When these poor people where experimented upon with syphilis without their explicit knowledge and consent, and then were denied treatment by their Mengele-like doctors, most of them looked for alternative treatments out there (colloidal silver, etc) so they could function. Of course, these poor victims unknowingly infected their families as well.

    (For the record, there were class action lawsuits and settlements for the survivors decades later, but not a single one of those criminal doctors saw a day in prison. Not one. If anything, they claimed they were experimenting on their fellow citizens "for the glory of science.")
     
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  6. Dufresne

    Dufresne almost there...

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    I think Horowitz promotes his ideas out of compassion. He's treated about as many chronic Lyme patients as anyone and is convinced that the same complicating issues are being overlooked again and again; that many suffering patients are not doing as well as they could. I think he's right.
     
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  7. JMS1958

    JMS1958

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    His book is very good if you go the long course of pharmacutical Antibiotics.
    That being said I may do that route if my IGENX tests come back positive.
    Another really great book is Stephen Buhners book Lymes disease published in 2005. He has a new one out with Coinfections, but I love the first book as it really get into herbal antibiotics and very in depth on how these 100 million year old bacteria attack our bodies and manipulate our immune systems to survive.
     
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  8. Dufresne

    Dufresne almost there...

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    Here's a more recent talk, with some new information.

    His work with Dapsone is particularly interesting to me as one infected with both borrelia and babesia. It seems to be a breakthrough therapy for some patients.

     
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  9. sianrecovery

    sianrecovery Senior Member

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    thanks for posting the lecture, really useful
     
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  10. Horizon

    Horizon Senior Member

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    I think I watched that seminar. Is this to sign up for a new one coming up?
     
  11. sarah darwins

    sarah darwins I told you I was ill

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    Great video.

    Can anyone decipher what he says at 1:05:00 when he mentions a bacteria that "stops gluten sensitivity"? I've listened a few times but can't make out the name of the bacteria.
     
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  12. valentinelynx

    valentinelynx Senior Member

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  13. Helen

    Helen Senior Member

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  14. sarah darwins

    sarah darwins I told you I was ill

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    Ah, thanks. What good hearing you have!

    This gets a bit confusing though. Redlabs, as linked by Helen, seem to think you don't want too much of the Rothia, with anything over that 0.2 threshold being red-flagged. But that PLOS 1 paper implies Rothia is helpful, at least for gluten digestion.
     
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  15. valentinelynx

    valentinelynx Senior Member

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    Maybe my computer has better speakers? I often have trouble understanding dialog in TV or movies. I always have to have the closed caption on (drives my hubby crazy). It's a difficulty with field independence, I think, that came with the illness... same thing that prevents good multi-tasking. Without closed captions I'm always stopping the show and saying "what did he say?" A fluke that I was able to get what Dr H was saying there, I think... Sorry, that was off topic.
     
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  16. Dufresne

    Dufresne almost there...

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    This is part of an article taken from Cort's site.

    I just stumbled onto this upcoming Fluge and Mella study again and it set off a few bells for me. I believe this problem with vascular endothelial function factors massively into a number of my symptoms and I’ve good reason to suspect it’s my tick-borne infections that are behind it.

    I've BP problems that are only helped with NRI's. Of course these drugs would be having their effect on endothelial cells in blood vessels. However, on the other side, when my vascular system becomes somewhat dilated I feel the greatest sense of calm, and my fasciculations even improve or altogether disappear. This is something I've also experienced while treating intracellular infections.

    Horowitz claims at around 1:30:00 and 1:47:00 of this most recent video that most of his toughest to treat patients are seeing improvements with combinations including dapsone. These are patients who’ve tried just about everything else to no avail. Sound familiar? When I think of sicker and more difficult to treat Lyme patients I think of those who also meet an ME/CFS diagnosis.

    If you watch from about 46:00 through 47:15 you’ll see Horowitz talks about his dapsone successes and his suspicion that the drug is working on intracellular borrelia in macrophages and endothelial cells, and how these cells are critical in controlling inflammation. Perhaps this relates to the Fluge and Mella findings about endothelial cells. Are those with chronic Lyme who are tougher to treat more prone to POTS? What about PEM? Just brainstorming. I’d love to hear any ideas.
     
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  17. duncan

    duncan Senior Member

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    Lyme has been shown to populate endothelial cells. I have POTS. I am also on dapsone.

    I am just not at a position yet there is a connection. But the possibilities are fun.
     
  18. Dufresne

    Dufresne almost there...

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    My dapsone is on the way. Should be here in about a week.

    Didn't you test positive for antibodies to babesia? I ask because I don't think I could have made any Lyme progress without getting my babesia load down. It's changed my Lyme treatment in a big way. Babesia is a very immuno-suppressant bug. And I didn't have the typical sweats or other signs of babesia. A shit load of anxiety? Yes.
     
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  19. duncan

    duncan Senior Member

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    Lots of anxiety, yes. I have not been treated for babesia yet as I only tested positive to antibodies, and the one time they looked for the parasite they didn't find it. Am being treated for bartonella and Lyme, as titers on both have actually risen in the past few years more often than they have declined. Believe it or not, my treating doc is not ILADS - he is strict IDSA, but he is hard-pressed to explain my TBD values and symptoms in any way other than active infections.

    FYI, dapsone hasn't change anything yet. I just tossed down another 500 mg for my dessert. :)
     
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  20. Dufresne

    Dufresne almost there...

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    500mg is a very big dose. How long have you been taking it? Which other antimicrobials are you taking?
     

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