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Does Choline slow down motility?

Discussion in 'Problems Standing: Orthostatic Intolerance; POTS' started by Peyt, Sep 21, 2017.

  1. Peyt

    Peyt Senior Member

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    Hi,
    I have gotten mixed results with Choline in the past. It helps slow down my heart rate which is great but it also slows down my bowel motility. Have SIBO (small intestine bacterial over-growth) I have slow motility to begin with. Back when I tried Choline I had no idea what POTS was and that I had it. Now that I read up on Choline I see that it effects the Vagus Nerve which surprisingly is something that is talked about a lot as a part of the process of SIBO treatment ... So my question is if Choline is actually a Vagus nerve stimulator why would it slow down bowel motility? I would think that it should correct the motility or at least not effect it negatively? Any thoughts?
     
  2. Peyt

    Peyt Senior Member

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    Last edited: Sep 21, 2017
  3. PinkPanda

    PinkPanda Senior Member

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    I think in general choline can be helpful for gut motility, but indiviually it probably depends on why you have slow gut motility. If your low acetylcholine levels are affecting your gut function it can be helpful, but there might be other reasons for your symptoms.

    Are you taking magnesium? Magnesium deficiency can lead to low gut function. Also, magnesium is needed to activate vitamin B1, and B1 deficiency can lead to constipation. I don't tolerate vitamin B1 well, though, I can't recommend it.

    Vitamin B3 can lower adrenaline levels, if you have high adrenaline and that stimulates the sympathetic nervous system, this might impact digestive function (just my own thoughts).

    Also, possibly the choline form could be a problem. Phosphatidylcholine as a phospholipid in the cell membranes can bind calcium to the membrane/ that might reduce calcium. I don't know how calcium relates to gut function, but if it is important, maybe you'd tolerate another choline form better?

    And serotonin might also be important to simulate the vagus nerve, if low serotonin is an issue for you.
     
  4. sb4

    sb4 Senior Member

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    I have heard the certain gut bugs love choline, such that if you have a high number of these, they could be eating your choline and then the bugs themselves could cause lack of motility?

    Have you tried using the choline transdermally?
     
    Peyt likes this.
  5. Peyt

    Peyt Senior Member

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    No I have not but I would be very interested. Is there any ? I have never seen Transdermal Choline.
     
  6. sb4

    sb4 Senior Member

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    Lolinda has a post on it. Apparently you can just add water to something like alpha GPC and apply it to your skin. I have done this but cannot say I have seen effects from it yet others have.
     
  7. Peyt

    Peyt Senior Member

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    I tried that, it did not work... Choline is kinda strange when it comes to crossing the blood brain barrier... even with Choline supplements I can feel the difference in less than 1 hour in some brands and nothing in other brands... The one I posted the link of in my earlier post definitely works as far as feeling the calm and peacefulness and it even helps with my headaches, if it only did not have that side effect!
     
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