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Does anyone actually know what these lumps are under the skin - especially the ribs?

Discussion in 'Skeleton, Skin, Muscles, Hair, Teeth, and Nails' started by snowathlete, Mar 23, 2012.

  1. snowathlete

    snowathlete

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    Something i have noticed more of lately has been lumps under my skin, especially the rib area, but other places too. Just about everywhere i think, but more noticable on the rib cage.

    They are sore if you rub your fingers along them, and tend to be small - about the size of peas.
    I read other people with ME/CFS have them too.

    I wonder if anyone knows what they actually are?

    And why do we get them? I mean there has to be some kind of explaination to it. Has anyone had them removed, or studied to see what they are compossed of?
  2. justy

    justy Senior Member

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    Hi Snow, i have lumps that are sore to touch over my bottom ribs - sometimes they swell up and get bigger and more painful. I have also noticed smaller, as you say pea sized lumps under the skin that are also sore. They dont correspond with lymph nodes as far as i can tell. I tried discussing the rib one with my doctor but was met with the usual incredulous stare, he didnt even want to discuss it - another female GP said i had a detached rib -it ceratinly wasnt that at all.
    I would be interested to hear what others have to say about this.
  3. Sparrow

    Sparrow Senior Member

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    I have those bumps too! ...Most of mine are on my upper ribs. They definitely get more pronounced and more painful sometimes.

    Unfortunately, I have no idea what they are either. Have used up my incredulous doctor stares on other things. ;)
  4. mellster

    mellster Marco

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    Just a thought, this sounds similar to the FM lumps described (and never fully accepted by mainstream) by St Amand (the guaifenesin guy). Just google 'FM lumps st amand' and check it out. Hope this helps.
    Min likes this.
  5. triffid113

    triffid113 Day of the Square Peg

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    I do not know about pea sized lumps that hurt. I get a few that do not hurt. I believe they are, or are related to, skin tags. Dr. Eric Braverman says skin tags are caused by insufficient folate.

    Triffid113
  6. justy

    justy Senior Member

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    This is quite different to skin tags i think - they are largish lumps under the skin. I read up on some of the fibro links posted above, which was very interesting stuff. The thing that confuses me though is that i don't have fibro (i don't think anyway!) but in do have the lumps in all the places described on the websites.
    Strange.
    Justy
  7. mellster

    mellster Marco

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    Since my viral onset in 2009 I have developed occasional, waxing and waning (waxing with exercise esp. jogging motion), very localized and very superficial pain by my upper left ribs close to the central cartiledge. It was dxed as costochondritis and part of FM (I had and still have some general inflammatory pain), but invisible in (almost all) diagnostics. I am in good shape again and unless I stimulate that region it is very mild and generally dull, but although I don't particularly feel any lumps St Amands theory is that it is calcified regions that hurt and the CA need to be 'drained' via big doses of guaifenesin and avoidance of salicilates. As strange as it sounds and as unaccepted as it is it is the closest non-basket case explanation for FM/chostondritis pain besides "invisible" low-level inflammation. Coincidentaly my viral onset came with a week of bad chest pain (stinging not dull) at exactly the same area that is still hurting dull now and I have asked numerous times whether it could have been scar tissue or calcified tissue form the viral infection which was raging in the chest but have only earned blank stares so far ;) I just haven't had the guts and time to go through with a hardcore guiafenesin protocol although it seems to have a beneficial effect on me generally whenever I take it (e.g. to loosen mucous).
  8. snowathlete

    snowathlete

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    Snap. It was interesting to read, thanks to mellster for suggesting that. It certainly could be, i dont know. I dont have FM - at least, like Justy, not that i know.

    Pea sized isnt exactly accurate really, i shoudl add, because some are bigger, and some are more like bands of them.

    What exactly is guaifenesin, is it a safe thing to take in these doses? Why is it thought to remove the deposits?
  9. mellster

    mellster Marco

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    Here is a critical writeup of his theory:http://web.mit.edu/london/www/guai.html
    Also it talks about phosphate deposits, not calcium deposits though I think I read that those two are connected in his theory (calciumphosphate maybe?]
    Regarding guaifenesin, it is considered very safe as it is safe enough to be in children's cough syrup. It loosens mucous and is a mild muscle relaxer. You can get it pure as mucinex (the guai only version) or as herbal pills from stores on the web (google "air-power").
  10. Jenny

    Jenny Senior Member

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    I had a subarachnoid (brain) haemorrhage after being on guaifenesin for 8 months, some years ago. It may have had nothing to do with the guai, but there is some evidence that it has blood thinning properties.

    I contacted Dr St Amand after I had the haemorrhage, and he said it couldn't be due to the guai, but I do wonder.

    It wasn't doing anything for me anyway. (I had been diagnosed with fibro, but didn't have any lumps.)

    Jenny

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