The 12th Invest in ME Research Conference June, 2017, Part 2
MEMum presents the second article in a series of three about the recent 12th Invest In ME International Conference (IIMEC12) in London.
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Does Acetylcholine increase appetitie?

Discussion in 'Alternative Therapies' started by Peyt, Oct 11, 2017.

  1. Peyt

    Peyt Senior Member

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    Hi,
    Does anyone know if Acetylcholine can increase appetite?
    If yes, any suggestion on how to counter this ?
    Thanks so much
    Peyt
     
  2. PinkPanda

    PinkPanda thebiochemcorner.com

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    Acetylcholine can stimulate insulin secretion in the pancreas. I sometimes eat more carbohydrates when taking choline.
     
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  3. Peyt

    Peyt Senior Member

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    That makes sense! And excess insulin lowers blood sugar which in turn makes the person hungry, right??
    Acetylcholine does wonders for my anxiety and fast heart beat but I get so hungry... off course having a mild fatty liver
    in my case does not help either.... I wonder if supplements like ALA would help counter the excess secretion of insulin?? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
     
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  4. PinkPanda

    PinkPanda thebiochemcorner.com

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    Right.

    Choline helps me with anxiety, too. :)
    I don't tolerate most supplements well, so I can only recommend few that I tolerate.

    Vitamin B3/ Niacin needs tryptophan for synthesis and B3 tends to help me eat less carbohydrates. It's always said that carbohydrates are good for raising tryptophan, so maybe B3 helps by lowering tryptophan requirement?

    I had gut problems with histamine intolerance for a long time and had to eat a lot, too. Vitamin B2/ riboflavin helped with that. It sometimes induced anxiety and worsens my mood though.

    I also take hydroxocobalamin/B12, but I am testing dosage and best way to take it at the moment... a bit unsure there.


    In general, I think supplements that effectively strengthen fatty acid oxidation and energy metabolism could help, so that you have more energy to produce glucose for the blood sugar.
     
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  5. Peyt

    Peyt Senior Member

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    Interesting on B3,
    Does it have to be Niacin or could it be Niacinamide as well? (Niacin gives me a headache)
     
  6. Peyt

    Peyt Senior Member

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    Also, cornstarch is suppose to keep blood glucose up, I wonder if It could help.
     
  7. Alvin2

    Alvin2 If humans were rational...

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    I don't know, my personal experience is mixed
     
  8. PinkPanda

    PinkPanda thebiochemcorner.com

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    I was saying niacin, as in not some activated form like NADH. I think niacinamide should be fine too.
     
  9. Peyt

    Peyt Senior Member

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  10. PinkPanda

    PinkPanda thebiochemcorner.com

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    I actually don't even really know the differences between niacin/nicotinamide.
    I found this on wikipedia

    Niacin supplementation has not been found useful for decreasing the risk of cardiovascular disease in those already on a statin,[8] but appears to be effective in those not taking a statin.[9] Although niacin and nicotinamide are identical in their vitamin activity, nicotinamide does not have the same pharmacological effects (lipid modifying effects) as niacin. Nicotinamide does not reduce cholesterol or cause flushing.[10] As the precursor for NAD and NADP, niacin is also involved in DNA repair.[11][12]


    So, you're right, they definitely seem to have some differing effects. What I said about tryptophan should apply to both forms, since both forms can be active as vitamin B3 and that might reduce tryptophan requirement. So although nicotinamide might not directly increase blood sugar, it could still reduce the requirement for tryptophan/ carbohydrates.

    Thankyou, because of you I got aware of the niacin/nicotinamide issue. I have problems with histamine intolerance and I read flushes are partly related to histamine secretion, so I think I'll try nicotinamide instead of niacin.
     
  11. Peyt

    Peyt Senior Member

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    You are welcome.. by the way, I think it's not nicotinamide, it's niacinamide! It might be the same thing but when I go to buy the supplement from stores or amazon niacinamide is easier to find.
     
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  12. PinkPanda

    PinkPanda thebiochemcorner.com

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    Thankyou. I even found an old niacinamide supplement in the basement and tried it today. I don't always get more appetite from choline, I also get a feeling of hypoglykemia and weakness. Haven't actually measured a too low blood sugar yet.
    And I noticed today that I get more of a hypoglykemic feeling with niacinamide than niacin. So maybe the niacin is more effective in compensating choline.

    I also noticed another thing today again. Magnesium also help compensate choline-induced symptoms.

    I also sometimes get a headache from too much niacin and I read that niacin is used for overmethylation treatment, while niacinamide doesn't help there. So I think niacin might reduce methylation more and when taking it, it might be important to support methylation at the same time. Choline, b2, sublingual hydroxoB12 and magnesium all support methylation and I tolerate them much better than methylB12, methylfolate.

    Like you, I also have some real benefits from choline, and I am still trying to compensate negative-effects with other supplements. :) Unsure, wether I'll be able to or if I just don't tolerate choline...
     

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