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Documentary: Undercover in German Lyme Clinics

Discussion in 'Lyme Disease and Co-Infections' started by mattie, Oct 19, 2017.

  1. duncan

    duncan Senior Member

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    Perhaps this reflects on the accuracy of your records. If so, welcome to the predicament many communities in the US fear themselves in vis-a-vis CDC reports of Lyme prevalence by state.
     
  2. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    Perhaps, but the Big Tick Project looks well organized, and was set up in recognition of the growing problem of Lyme disease.

    The Big Tick Project complied their tick map by asking vets throughout the UK to count the number of ticks they found on dogs each week, and to send the ticks to the University of Bristol for identification.

    If you zoom right into the map, it will tell you which species of tick were found on dogs in the area, using the following color coding scheme:

    sheep tick Ixodes ricinus (shown as a green dot on map)
    hedgehog tick Ixodes hexagonus (yellow dot on map)
    fox or dog tick Ixodes canisuga (violet dot on map)

    It says here that in the UK, Lyme disease is known to be carried by the above three ticks.



    In France they are also suddenly getting concerned about ticks, and are creating their own tick map:

    France launches 'tick alert app' in frantic bid to map Lyme disease explosion as blight 'moves North'

    The article says that France now gets 30,000 new cases of Lyme disease per year.
     
  3. duncan

    duncan Senior Member

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    @Hip, yes, that does look cool. Does anyone actually check the ticks for pathogen burden?

    Edited to add: Where I live, over 50% of ticks carry at least one TBD. Now, cross-check that against a Scandinavian study that suggested less than 3% of people bitten by infected ticks contract Lyme. How does that math play out? Is someone wrong? Could it vary by species or even strain?

    More data hopefully can only help.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2017
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  4. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    As far as I know, they did not check which infections the ticks carried; they just mapped the locations and the species of the ticks found on dogs by vets local to each area.
     
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  5. duncan

    duncan Senior Member

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    It is still a good exercise.
     
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  6. pattismith

    pattismith Senior Member

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    Two studies published in France in 2017 about zoonotic Rickettsia and Babesia:
    First identification of Rickettsia helvetica in questing ticks from a French Northern Brittany Forest
    • Sarah I. Bonnet ,Richard E. L. Paul,Emmanuel Bischoff,Martine Cote,Evelyne Le Naour
    • Published: March 1, 2017
    "Tick-borne rickettsiae are considered to be emerging, but data about their presence in western Europe are scarce. Ixodes ricinus ticks, the most abundant and widespread tick species in western Europe, were collected and tested for the presence of several tick-borne pathogens in western France, a region never previously explored in this context. There was a high tick abundance with a mean of 4 females, 4.5 males, and 23.3 nymphs collected per hour per collector. Out of 622 tested ticks, specific PCR amplification showed the presence of tick symbionts as well as low prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi (0.8%), Bartonella spp. (0.17%), and Anaplasma phagocytophilum (0.09%). The most prevalent pathogen was Rickettsia helvetica (4.17%). This is the first time that this bacteria has been detected in ticks in this region, and this result raises the possibility that bacteria other than those classically implicated may be involved in rickettsial diseases in western France."

    https://hal-anses.archives-ouvertes.fr/pasteur-01570199/document

    [​IMG]
    Low prevalence of zoonotic Babesia in small mammals and Ixodes ricinus in Brittany, France

    Maggy Jouglin 1 Grégoire Perez 1, 2 Alain Butet 2 Laurence Malandrin 1 Suzanne Bastian 1

    Abstract : In order to evaluate the zoonotic risk due to Babesia spp., especially B. microti, we investigated their presence in 597 individuals of five small mammal species and in 2620 questing nymphs of Ixodes ricinus in rural landscapes of Western France (Brittany). Small mammals (rodents and shrews) are indeed suspected to be reservoir hosts for B. microti, and the tick I. ricinus is the vector of the three main zoonotic species in Europe, i.e. B. divergens, B. venatorum and B. microti. Only one bank vole carried B. microti (genotype "Munich") and only 13 and 2 nymphs of Ixodes ricinus ticks carried B. venatorum and B. capreoli respectively. According to these results, prevalences observed for zoonotic Babesia (0.17% for small mammals and 0.50% for ticks), indicate that exposure of humans to this infectious agent is probably low in western France.

    https://hal.laas.fr/ECOBIO/hal-01533216v1

     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2017
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  7. pibee

    pibee Senior Member

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    Only thing that kills Lyme persisters in vitro, (and candida!) but doesnt kill any of the gut microbiome, is disulfiram.

    that's what I'm trying now.
    Lowest risk i think. Except should be super paranoid about alcohol, including tinctures.
    I did 5 days of disulfiram, then I got my too high CellTrend and got so depressed that I had to stop disulfiram because I couldnt promise myself I wont get drunk (yes, I sound alcoholic too :( ). But disulfiram stays in the body so long, you cant drink safely for days even weeks after it. not sure. But i waited a week until I got drunk

    2 group of researchers confirmed disulfiram kills persisters in vitro, Kim Lewis and someone else, I forgot who. Zhang didnt test it , so it seems. Animal trial is on the way but should have already been published this summer...there are 2 people who tried it besides me, one success story (she is blogging about it on FB), and other person stopped because severe reaction (he doesnt know if it's herx). So... I'm third and with my overlap with high stress and many things happening I cant claim if it did anything in 5 days.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2017
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  8. perrier

    perrier Senior Member

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    I am so desperately sorry and pained to hear this dear Advocate. It's a horrific situation. And I find there is not enough outrage over the thousands of such cases. I guess we should be out demonstrating, asking for help. But the caregiver is trapped,for she is needed around the clock.
     
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  9. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    By the way, for those with Lyme, there is a story here of how hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) in a soft chamber (mild HBOT) at home led to remission for one Lyme patient. Oxygen is likely toxic to Borrelia, as Borrelia are more-or-less anaerobic bacteria and cannot deal with high levels of oxygen, so that may be how HBOT treats Lyme. But it took over year of daily treatments in a soft chamber at home before this patient attained remission.

    Although home soft HBOT chambers may be beyond most people's budgets (they cost $6000), I speculate in this thread that breathing 100% oxygen using a non-rebreather mask and an oxygen concentrator machine (which cost $300) will be just as effective as a soft HBOT chamber.
     
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  10. pattismith

    pattismith Senior Member

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    I have one, I would be silly not to give it a try...Do you know how long a session should last?

    maybe @Learner1 would tell us?
     
  11. Learner1

    Learner1 Professional Patient

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    I do 60-80 minutes 3x a week.
     
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  12. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    If you are using a properly set up non-rebreather mask, and assuming your oxygen concentrator machine supplies close to 100% oxygen, then the concentration you will be breathing in will also be close to 100% (whereas if you use a simple face mask, you will only be breathing around 40% oxygen, which is why a non-rebreather is I think necessary in order to get the required high concentration of oxygen).

    At concentrations of around 100%, oxygen can begin be toxic to the lungs after breathing it continuously for around 24 hours. But I would guess that something like 60 minutes of breathing oxygen once daily would hopefully be safe (although I have yet to find any medical literature that confirms this).

    As mentioned, the Lyme patient who went into remission after a year or so did daily 60 minute sessions in their soft HBOT chamber. So I think you would want to mirror that protocol as much as possible, and thus also do daily 60 minute sessions.

    The Lyme patient said they felt the first change in their status after about 2 months.
     
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  13. Learner1

    Learner1 Professional Patient

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    You could also look into 10 pass ozone which is faster and more intense. 3 weeks with 5 sessions per week.

    Its described here...

    http://thepowerofozone.com/ozone-high-dose-10-pass/

    There are 2 brands of machines made in Germany. I have a friend who did it for chronic EBV with good results and I've spoken to a Lymie with multiple coinfections who did it with Dr. Robert Rowan and he says its the only intervention that's helped him.

    It's important to monitor antioxidant levels and compensate.
     
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  14. TrialAndError

    TrialAndError

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    An MD told me yesterday that blood tests can be fooled by antibiotics that you're taking.

    Also, about 10 years ago, I was denied Doxycycline by the Infectious Disease Specialist at a major Canadian hospital, because he wanted to wait for blood test results, despite my bulls-eye rash photo on my camcorder, and list of symptoms printed out, including inability to mentally multiply 6 times 3.

    The specialist doctor also said that we didn't have Lyme in Canada. So, I showed both doctors pages of printouts that, yes, we have Lyme in Canada. I also showed him an article that the Lyme test was less than 60% accurate, and that I could be a vegetable mentally by the time that report comes back.

    Fortunately, the young ER got pity, and gave me a 6-week Doxy prescription after the specialist doctor left.

    Today, I'm in the same boat almost. I've beaten the Early Lyme, but my friend who is two weeks ahead of me in the same "bite series" of insect bites (identical type of unusual bites, 1mm holes, look like mini-volcanoes) is now experiencing really bad Lyme/Bartonella symptoms.

    I only got 2 weeks of Doxy, but took 800mg/daily for 72 hours, and my initial dose was 200mg, not 100mg. (Per Johns Hopkins suggestion iirc).

    Comments on all this? I do not want to be in chronic Lyme.

    My friend (neighbor) is experiencing worse mental fog, pains in the head, pains in the abdomen, depression, anxiety, etc etc.

    I have "cleared" all symptoms, including: Anxiety, feeling of hopelessness, feeling detached from reality, vision issues, etc.

    Only have some fatigue at 6pm or so, requiring a nap of 15 minutes.

    Energy is very high again, except for my late afternoons.

    Any information/comments for me and my friend/neighbor would be really appreciated.

    Cheers!
     

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