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Doctor Yasko result help

Discussion in 'Detox: Methylation; B12; Glutathione; Chelation' started by ninauae, Feb 10, 2013.

  1. ninauae

    ninauae

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    Dear Triffid,
    Thank you for brief reply once again as I forgot to mentioned my results for Hair analysis report which I did on 18th Sep 2012.

    calcium----------83 High (28 – 81)
    Magnesium-------9 High end (4 – 9)
    Sodium-----------12 L (13 – 45)
    Potassium------------2 L (5 – 18)
    iron-------------0.7 L (2 – 4.5)
    copper-------------0.9 L (1.5 – 3)
    Manganese------------.007 Low ( 0.02 – 0.0006)
    Zinc-------------------17 ok ( 16 – 26)
    Chromium----------------------0.081 Low (.008 – 0.16)
    Selenium-------------0.061 Low (0.12 --0.21)
    Phosphorus------------12 low ( 12.8 - 19.2)
    Nickel------------------.009 (Less than 0.03)
    Cobalt--------------.001 Low (Less than 0.03)
    Molybdenum------------------.005 Low (Less than 0.03)
    Boron----------zero
    Lithium--------------.003 Low ( 0.2 and above)

    I did 24 hours urine test in mid 2012 as well which showed my zinc was in upper high limit. Its really confusing and in my entire life as never took cal or mag supplement. I tried to take cal citrate with Mag and K from gnc brand but my breathing problem got worse so I stopped them.
    Anyway I really appreciate the help you provided me and that for sure I am going to implement it esp introducing all active B in my life.
    May God bless you and take care
     
  2. triffid113

    triffid113 Day of the Square Peg

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    Hi, I am back after being away awhile, time flies. What I have found is this: allergies cause zinc deficiency which cause, over time, thyroid deficiency since you need zinc to make thyroid hormone. I don't think the thyroid needs that much zinc so it takes awhile for this to occur, such as DURING WINTER. Pharmacists study allergy medications using cold, dry air as it reliably produces allergy symptoms in sufferers. Winter is northing but cold, dry air. Winter is alot longer than 1 month.

    My seasonal allergies last 1 month and I find I can last about 3 weeks before my adrenal gland goes (also needs zinc) and I can tell this because I have 3 genes causing high blood pressure, but all of a sudden I have low blood pressure and need salt or I will pass out. I assume my thyroid goes out because I am so exhausted I cannot lift a finger.

    Since I discovered this last year I have been supplementing zinc at a high rate and find I need 150mg zinc/day to be able to breath during allergies and to stave off the adrenal failure etc. I do not have a complete story, for one thing I have about 1/3 more genetic defects than most of you, and I am female so suffer hormonal changes (although blunted by being over 50), and seasonal changes, etc which make it pretty hard to tell exactly what helps. But it seems to me that I am trying to do too much with zinc and that actually a lower dose of zinc might be prefferable with a higher protein intake. Protein food is higher in zinc anyway, but actual protein is needed as well as zinc to repair damaged mucous membranes. Arginine in supposedly important in wound healing. I did notice if I bought a whole chicken and ate a lot of it (not usually my thing) that it helped a lot.

    I am afraid of high dose zinc because it interferes with copper absorption so you are on your own with that. I did find a study (du7nno know where now) that concluded that it requires 75mg of zinc to ward off a cold so I am not the only one who discovered high doses are needed. The authors of the study on zinc concluded it was impractical. So even though I knew I needed 150mg I went through this winter only taking 75mg for fear of mucking with my copper status. I wonder things like whether allergies use up zinc faster than it can ever be replaced. I am concerned that at my age (nonoptimal hormones) I do not make enough metallothionein to absorb that much zinc and copper as well, as I believe there might be some link between metallothionein levels and hormone levels.

    This winter I did not run a humidifier. This winter my thyroid went low but not out. On 75mg zinc/day my adrenal gland never went out so I did not have low blood pressure. In fact, due to low thyroid I had raised cholesterol which affects circulation, so I had high blood pressure all winter. (Hypo thyroid causes raised cholesterol). I THOUGHT I had a UTI that would not go away despite taking d-mannose and cranberry and I was waiting to get my doctor's advice at my March appointment. A UTI causes raised blood pressure. I had nocturia, which means I retained water all day and had to get up repeatedly at night to pee it out. Lower back pain also.

    Well here is what I came to find out: HYPOTHYROID, EVEN SUBCLINICALLY, REDUCES GFR (glumular filtration rate), in other words, HYPOTHYROID REVERSIBLY SLOWS KIDNEY FUNCTION (causes nocturia, water retention) and this CAUSES HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE.

    There are studies. I can include a few. Maybe next note. I am experimenting with thyroid glandulars. But the weather is warming and humidifying so it will be impossible to calibrate what is working. Also now that my arteries are clogged, I prolly have to figure out how to clean themout before I can get my blood pressure back to normal. If I survive that long. I'm drinking a lot of kombucha. Oh, yes, next winter I'm getting a portable humidifier.

    Triff
     
  3. triffid113

    triffid113 Day of the Square Peg

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    Nina, I want to say that I am not a doctor and I do not have my on=wn problems solved, I am only passing on clues that may or may not help you. I do not measure my zinc I only take it based on symptoms and observed relief. I have been taking zinc since I was a kid because I read in a book kby nutritionist Adele Davis that "alldiabetics are low in zinc" and diabetes runs in my family and the Nutrition desk Referenxce says it is safe even at high doses. It was my childish theory that maybe I could prevent diabetes by never getting low on zinc. In fact I had a friend who slipped and fell on the ice and it made her become a diabetic, a brittle diabeteic, and she later died of diabetes. It was my theory that the adrenal rush used up all her zinc causing the diabetes. idk if preventing low zinc can prevent diabetes but I do not want to find out. Especially since I have been experimenting blithely with it for years based on observing symptoms. So I paid attention for a metallic tatse to determine if I had too much, not very scientific, but a crude measure nonetheless. And to symptom reversal...being able to breath and still function when I have a cold or allergy. I have no idea what my zinc lab is and I have doubts whether the lab is reliable. For instance I know that serum copper is bogus as is serum magnesium...the blood robs these minerals from tissues to attempt to keep the blood levels normal. what other minerals might it do this for? You could research it, but I have not. So I can make no comment at all about lab values of serum zinc as I just don't know.

    But I am very curious about your calcium and magnesium readings as didn't you say that 6 months ago they were low? What changed between readings? Did you take D, K? Do you eat a lot of greens? Did you start to eat a lot of greens? Switch to some calcium fortified product? Oh, I see this is via a hair analysis. I do not know what these readings mean in hair analysis.

    I don't know anything about potassium values in hair. I *do* trust potassium readings in serum. Have you had serum potassium tested? When I get a CBC I get it from www.lef.org and it comes with a chem which shows serum potassium. If you serum potassium is below 4.0 you should do whatever you feel is safe to raise it. I would never run my serum potassium below 4.2 because it is too easy to lose a bit and then get cramping and muscle problems (which is VERY painful, and your heart is a muscle so think about it). Doctors are not concerned unless it is below 3.5, but you WILL get symptoms at 4.0 or below. And cramping may not be all...I recall being so uncomfortable and - potentially shortness of breath and sweaty palms. Anyway it is the antithesis of being peaceful. So I like to keep a buffer of at least .2 away from symptoms and stay at 4.2 or above. I do not want it to hit 5.0 because I also want a buffer the other way. The problem I am having now is that if you have a kidney problem (including UTI) then you have a problem getting rid of potassium so you do NOT want to supplement. So...to supplement or not to supplement...I am guessing based on symptoms, but I don't like guessing. However Freddd has made a big deal here about how improving methylation (supplements like B12, active B's, TMG, SAMe, choline) opens up biochemical pathways that need potassium and thus LOWERS your potassium. So IF YOU ARE LOW IN POTASSIUM you need to especially beware.

    Where did you have your hair analysis done? (Mine were via traceelements.com) If the lab does not wash the hair sample they may be reliable. Looks like you need molybdenum. If your symptoms are due to allergy, your most likely fix is to take molybdenum. Low moly causes inability to get rid of heavy metals and some toxins which results in allergy or sensitivity to them hanging about in the body. This is only a guess but if you are low moly it seems like it would make it hard for you to get rid of homocysteine. So once you supply the moly you may find your methylation is not as good as it looks anymore. You may find you need methyls like methionine/TMG/choline to raise it back up and maybe active B's to process it. But wait to get a new homocysteine reading and see.

    Your thyroid was indeed a little low at 2.3 or so and it looks quite clear one reason may be low selenium (if you trust this hair analysis). You can take 200-400 msg (or whatever units) / day. Brazil nuts are high in selenium, so you could try them if you'd rather. I read once you only need 1/day but I have no idea if that's true. You might be somewhat low iodine as well. No major deficiencies but your thyroid is a little off and you'd feel better if it were not.

    You do not want to be low chromium. Chromium was one time identified as one of the top 10 supplements to lead to long life. Chromium helps your cells take up energy (helps prevent metabolic symdrome). For dieting, Dr. Braverman recommended one man take a high dose of 1000mcg?(whatever units). A non dieting dose may be 500. You'd have to check to be sure but I think you get it in pepper, so you could consider just peppering your food every day if you'd rather. (You'd have to consider dose effectiveness). Pepper does improve your digestion and thus can affect medicine dosages if you are on anything.

    Phosphorus is everywhere so I wouldn't worry about it unless you eat an Atkins-like LOW CARB diet. If you eat bread you will get all the phosphorus you need. It is also in pop but I wouldn't touch the stuff.

    In general if youer minerals are all low I would suspect you do not eta a lot of vegetables because they are the main source of dietary minerals. I personally would not take lithium. If you do, research the heck out of it because it may affect other nutrient levels and you need to understand that before taking it.

    One more thing...they are now saying that allergic rhinitis progresses to asthma with age. It may be you are getting asthma. I always wondered what caused one person to have allergic rhinitis while another had asthma and I have suspected the difference might be molybdenum level. I have a high moly level, don't know what I eat to achieve it. I have never had asthma so even before I took vitamins I still did not have asthma. So I suspect it has to do with eating a lot of fish or shellfish. My family has always been big on little canned aquatic things...oysters, crabs, mussels, shrimp, etc. They are high in zinc and copper, but maybe other minerals as well. I think they are high in purines and my family has some kind of purine issue that makes us crave shellfish. My hair analyst advised I eat more purines for some reason but I was incredulous because my family has occasional attacks of gout (purines cause high uric acid). So maybe some biochemical blockage causes up to crave purines and we cannot easily judge how much we need ...or not.

    I don't know if anyone else can help you any more. I wish there were more readers of this thread to jump in./ If anyone even so much as lithium experience to share it would be worth hearing.

    Triff
     
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  4. triffid113

    triffid113 Day of the Square Peg

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    http://journals.lww.com/amjmedsci/A...olumes_and_Renal_Function_in_Overt_and.7.aspx

    American Journal of the Medical Sciences: October 1999 - Volume 318 - Issue 4 - p 277
    Blood Volumes and Renal Function in Overt and Subclinical Primary Hypothyroidism

    VILLABONA, CARLES MD; SAHUN, MANUEL MD; ROCA, MANUEL PhD; MORA, JAUME MD; GÓMEZ, NÚRIA MD; GÓMEZ, JOSÉ M. MD; PUCHAL, RAFAEL PhD; SOLER, JOAN MD
    Introduction: Thyroid dysfunction is associated with marked alterations in cardiovascular and renal functions. In hypothyroidism, myocardial contractility, cardiac output, and oxygen consumption are decreased, whereas peripheral resistance is increased. Methods: We assessed blood volumes and effective renal plasma blood flow (ERPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in 17 patients with overt primary hypothyroidism and in 15 of these patients when in euthyroid state after substitutive therapy. We performed the same measurements in eight patients with subclinical hypothyroidism. Results: In the hypothyroid state, the plasma volume measured by dilution of 125I-albumin (APV) was higher than the calculated plasma volume (CPV) from packed red cell mass, suggesting an extravascular escape of albumin. After substitutive therapy, the CPV showed a statistical increase (P< 0.05), whereas APV remained unchanged. Both ERPF and GFR increased after thyroxine therapy (p< 0.05). In the subclinical group, blood volumes and renal function were similar to those found in the other group of patients when in the euthyroid state. Conclusions: We conclude that in primary hypothyroidism, ERPF and GFR are low, but that these values improve with substitutive therapy. CPV is a better index of the current plasma volume than APV. The difference between these two parameters suggests that the escape of albumin into the extravascular space in primary hypothyroidism is terminated by treatment. There are no clear abnormalities either in blood volumes or in renal function in subclinical hypothyroidism.
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2265.2005.02236.x/abstract

    Correlation between severity of thyroid dysfunction and renal function

    Jan G. Den Hollander1, Remi W. Wulkan2, Mart J. Mantel2,Arie Berghout1,*
    Clinical Endocrinology Volume 62, Issue 4, pages 423–427, April 2005
    Objective  Renal function is profoundly influenced by thyroid status; however, this has not been studied in detail in human subjects. The purpose of the present study was to determine the relationship between renal function and thyroid status before and after treatment for hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism, respectively.

    Design and patients  In 37 consecutive hypothyroid and 14 hyperthyroid patients renal function as measured by plasma creatinine and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) [based on the modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD) formula] was determined before treatment and after regaining euthyroidism.
    Results  Renal function improved significantly during treatment of hypothyroidism and decreased during treatment of hyperthyroidism. There was a strong correlation between the change in thyroid status determined as the ratio log10(fT4 post-treatment/fT4 pretreatment) and the change in renal function as a result of therapy expressed as serum creatinine (r2 = 0·81, P < 0·0001) and estimated GFR (0·69, P < 0·0001).
    Conclusion  The kidney is an important target of thyroid hormone action.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12469624
    Ter Arkh. 2002;74(10):20-3.
    [Lipid metabolism and functional status of the kidney in hypothyroid patients depending on the phase of disease].

    [Article in Russian]
    Nikolaeva AV, Pimenov LT.
    Abstract

    AIM:

    To evaluate renal function in correlation with lipid metabolism parameters in patients with primary hypothyroidism (HT) in compensation and decompensation.
    MATERIAL AND METHODS:

    45 HT patients' examination included study of blood creatinine, urea, cholesterol, triglycerides, high and low density lipoproteins, urinary microalbumin, thyroid hormones and thyrotropin, beta 2-microglobulin levels, glomerular filtration rate (GFR), renal functional reserve (RFR). Also, Zimnitsky test and ultrasound investigation of the kidneys were made.
    RESULTS:

    It was found that renal dysfunction in decompensated HT is characterized by normal renal concentration function, high intraglomerular pressure (low GFR and RFR), high concentration of beta 2-microglobulin in blood. Severe HT runs with negative correlation between GFR and total blood cholesterol, LDL. Albuminuria and low RFR in decompensated HT and marked hyperlipidemia suggest development of glomerulopathy related to abnormal physicochemical processes in glomerular endothelium.
    CONCLUSION:

    Patients with decompensated HT have apparant glomerular dysfunction and disturbances in lipid metabolism. Hyperlipidemia in HT is a factor of renal damage.
     
  5. Crux

    Crux Senior Member

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    Hi ninauae;
    I agree with triff that there needs to be many sources of minerals added. There are multi-mineral supplements, but I'm not sure what to recommend.

    Although I take some individual minerals, I try to get most from a variety of food sources. I make bone broths, and add alot of high mineral ingredients to a smoothie: nutritional yeast, blackstrap molasses, kelp, etc. Nuts and seeds supply minerals too.

    If the high calcium and magnesium in the hair minerals test correlates to high calcium and magnesium in the blood serum, there could be trouble, especially with calcium. I did lower my serum calcium with zinc supplementation. ( I've read that with zinc deficiency, magnesium tends to accumulate too.)

    I would guess that if cobalt is low, B12 may also be low. ( consider more tests or symptoms.)

    Trying to balance minerals, and especially the electrolytes can be really difficult, but if sodium and potassium are low, then I would begin with them, ( if the hair analysis corresponds to blood serum counts.)
     
  6. triffid113

    triffid113 Day of the Square Peg

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    http://www.eje-online.org/content/164/1/101.short
    Eur J Endocrinol January 1, 2011 164 101-105
    Clinical Study
    Association of thyroid function with estimated glomerular filtration rate in a population-based study: the HUNT study

    Bjørn Olav Åsvold, Trine Bjøro and Lars J Vatten

    Objective Low thyroid function may be associated with reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR). We therefore studied the association of thyroid function with estimated GFR (eGFR) in a population-based study.
    Design A cross-sectional, population-based study of 29 480 individuals above 40 years of age, without previously known thyroid disease.
    Methods We calculated geometric mean eGFR and odds ratio (OR) of chronic kidney disease (CKD; eGFR <60 ml/min per 1.73 m2) according to categories of thyroid function, using people with TSH in the lower third of the reference range (0.50–1.4 mU/l) as the comparison group.
    Results TSH within the reference range (0.50–3.5 mU/l) was negatively associated with eGFR (P for trend <0.001). Compared with people with TSH in the lower third of the reference range (83.0 ml/min per 1.73 m2), eGFR was lower in people with TSH in the middle (81.6 ml/min per 1.73 m2) and highest third (80.3 ml/min per 1.73 m2) of the reference range, and in people with subclinical (79.3 ml/min per 1.73 m2, P<0.001) or overt hypothyroidism (76.5 ml/min per 1.73 m2, P<0.001). The prevalence of CKD was higher in people with TSH in the middle (OR 1.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07–1.35) or highest third (OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.13–1.52) of the reference range, compared with people in the reference group. Also, CKD was more common in people with subclinical (OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.38–1.93) or overt (OR 1.98, 95% CI 1.22–3.20) hypothyroidism.
     
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  7. triffid113

    triffid113 Day of the Square Peg

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    Accumulating magnesium with a zinc deficiency rings a bell. Zinc deficiency causes hypothyroid. Hypothyroid causes a lot of mineral weirdicisms. I can't make head nor tail of them because hypo causess low serum whatever but high RBC whatever or high serum whatever and low RBC whatever for a handful of important minerals - it causes funny thing to happen with calcium, magnesium, and zinc. Like see here: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF02784440#page-1
     
  8. triffid113

    triffid113 Day of the Square Peg

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    http://jcem.endojournals.org/content/25/3/350.short

    Plasma and Erythrocyte Magnesium in Thyroid Disease

    JUAN E. RIZEK1, ALEXANDRA DIMICH and STANLEY WALLACH
    The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism March 1, 1965 vol. 25 no. 3 350-358

    Serial determinations of plasma and erythrocyte magnesium concentrations were made before and during therapy in 13 hyperthyroid and 12 hypothyroid patients. Plasma magnesium concentrations were initially subnormal in 7 hyperthyroid patients and returned to normal as a response to antithyroid therapy became manifest. In 6 normomagnesemic hyperthyroid patients, plasma magnesium concentrations also tended to increase with therapy. Six hypothyroid patients had supranormal plasma magnesium concentrations prior to therapy. These returned to normal with treatment in 5 patients, but one subject showed a persistent elevation of the plasma magnesium concentration despite a satisfactory response to therapy. A decrease in plasma magnesium concentrations also occurred in the 6 normomagnesemic hypothyroid patients. Pretreatment erythrocyte magnesium concentrations were subnormal in 6 hyperthyroid and one hypothyroid patient. The response of erythrocyte magnesium concentrations to therapy was unpredictable, and increased, decreased or remained unchanged without relation to thyroid status or plasma magnesium concentrations. Evidence suggests that these alterations in extracellular magnesium concentrations in thyroid disease result either from a defect in magnesium balance or in magnesium distribution. Since the erythrocyte magnesium concentration appears to be a poor indicator of body magnesium in thyroid disease, resolution of this problem must await the development of precise measurements of total and available tissue magnesium concentrations.
    Metabolism
    Volume 37, Issue 1, January 1988, Pages 61–67
    Alterations in magnesium and zinc metabolism in thyroid disease

    Eran Dolev, Patricia A. Deuster, Barbara Solomon, Ulrike H. Trostmann, Leonard Wartofsky, Kenneth D. Burman

    Metabolism, Volume 37, Issue 1, January 1988, Pages 61–67
    Magnesium (Mg) and zinc (Zn) status was assessed in subjects to evaluate the effects of thyroid diseases on Mg and Zn metabolism. Plasma and red blood cell (RBC) concentration and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (MNC) content of Mg and Zn, and 24-hour urinary excretion of Mg, Zn, creatinine (Cr), calcium (Ca), sodium (Na), and potassium (K) were measured in 11 thyrotoxic, 29 hypothyroid, and 25 euthyroid control subjects. Serum albumin, α2-macroglobulin, and the binding of Zn to albumin were also determined. Plasma and RBC Mg concentrations were low in half of the hyperthyroid subjects, but mean values were not significantly different from controls. Urinary excretion and clearance of Mg were lower in hypothyroid subjects, but differences were removed when expressed relative to Cr excretion and clearance. Similar patterns were noted for urinary Ca, Na, and K, suggesting that their reduced excretion reflects alterations in renal hemodynamics. Plasma Zn was lower in hypothyroid subjects and correlated with serum albumin; MNC Zn and urinary Zn were also low. Plasma Zn concentration was normal and serum albumin significantly lower in the hyperthyroid group than in the control group. Further, RBC Zn content was significantly lower in hyperthyroid subjects, and inversely related to plasma thyroxine concentration. The hyperthyroid group also excreted significantly greater amounts of Zn than controls, indicative of a catabolic process. This increased urinary loss may reflect a shift in the distribution of plasma Zn between ultrafilterable and Zn-albumin complexes. In summary, this study provides evidence for marked alterations in Zn homeostasis in persons with thyroid disease. Whether the observations indicate deficiency states and have clinical implications will require further investigation.
     
  9. triffid113

    triffid113 Day of the Square Peg

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    idk what is going on with you, but in my case, I have to evaluate my TSH relative to humidity at the time it was taken. Mine was 3.2 but that was after 3 days at 40 degrees and a consequent improvement in humidity and allergy symptoms. So I'm guessing my thyroid was worse than 3.2 indicates. The thyroid may recover faster than other things it causes (like lipidemia, potentially mineral stores). Think about the humidity when you had your TSH tested vs. your mineral readings. and vs. your symptoms.
     
  10. Crux

    Crux Senior Member

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    Hi triff;
    I'm not sure if my zinc supplementation has improved my thyroid status... hope so, but it did lower my high normal serum calcium -- a huge plus. ( hypercalcemia is deadly)

    I did have a highest normal serum magnesium a few years ago - I had it measured because I began to have side effects from mg. supplementation. I had stopped the mg. for several months before the test. Although kidney disease is associated with elevated mg., as well as adrenal insufficiency, I suspect in my case, it was low zinc. I haven't had mg. measured since supplementing zinc, yet. ( I read a study where in zinc def. rats accumulated mg.)
     
  11. triffid113

    triffid113 Day of the Square Peg

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    Yes, zinc deficiency causes hypothyroid which causes weird things to happen to mineral status due to that hypo lowers GFR (kidney ability to work). But it is hard to say what it does because it causes some minerals to go low or high in serum but the SAME minerals to behave differently in RBC. I am concerned because I supplement all this stuff and I wonder if I should not do that when I am hypo (during winter due to dry air).
     
  12. Crux

    Crux Senior Member

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    Hi triff;
    I'm not sure what could happen in your situation, but I did have some side effects when I took high amounts of zinc. ( skin lesions, fatigue, diarrhea) So I think it could effect the organs. High zinc may lower cortisol.

    ninauae; I noticed you had an elevated PTH and low vitamin D. I've read that PTH may become elevated because of low vitamin D, but this should be checked by a doctor, along with calcium, to make sure the parathyroid is OK.
     
  13. triffid113

    triffid113 Day of the Square Peg

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    Thanks Crux. There is some relation between PTH and Vitamin D but I am not clear on what it is. My Dad's kidney doctor would tell us to stop Vitamin D supplementation basd on my Dad's PTH status. (So it may be that high PTH is a result of high D, but I don't think the reaction is that simple and I think therefore the doctors got it wrong).

    So ok I have consistently high blood pressure now and figure that since my hypothyroid got my cholesterol up to 240 I may nort be able o get it out of my arteries very fast (so like I can take thyroid glandular but I don't seem to be lowering my b.p. doing so I believe the cholesterol already in my arteries is still there). What do you think about these measures for possibly clearing out my arteries?

    (K2) MK4 45mg (I read this eliminates plaque and that bone mass correlates with artery plaque, and the Japanese treat ost6eopenia (which I have) with 45mg/day MK4)
    Omega-3 - 3 g
    nattokinase - dunno how much
    serrapeptase (maybe)
    garlic (against blood clots - it is anti PAF)
    almonds - 3/day
    mild exercise, something peaceful like walking
    low fat diet

    P.S. no skin lesions or those other effects from high zinc. ...however I postulate you would get that if it drove you low copper. The guy who wrote a book on potassium vs. RA had a chapter on copper and said he felt that "the tendency to cut oneself while shaving" indicated a copper deficiency, as copper is needed to make thick skin (for cross-linking of collagen). W/o it you have thin fragile easily broken skin. Zinc does interfere with copper status. It definitely interferes with copper absorption since they are both absorbed by the same moleciule: metallothionein, but it is unknown (at least by me) whether or not it interferes in other ways. I take estrogen pellets and estrogen helps one absorb copper - that and the copper supplementation I do keeps me from skin lesions I guess.
     
  14. UM MAN

    UM MAN

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    Have you found an inexpensive 45mg K2/MK4 source????
     
  15. Crux

    Crux Senior Member

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    Hi Y'all;
    Here's a brief article than explains the basics of PTH,calcium, and vitamin D. Although I'm sure it can be more complex than this, it looks good for starters.
    http://surgery.med.umich.edu/genera...ditions/parathyroid/hyperparathyroidism.shtml

    Hi triff; this article is out of Michigan, so I thought about you. So, your symptoms are; high BP and high cholesterol. I understand the concern about high BP. I wonder what you are averaging? I've read that we can expect to have an increase as we age, and that pharmaceutical co.s make a good profit pushing BP med.s on us. But I also recall that you have a familial high BP, with kidney involvement. The only personal experience I have with this is that, when I was taking too much cortisol for a time, my BP shot up to 160/110. ( Before cortisol replacement, I was way low with BP, fainting and such.) Eventually, I reduced the cortisol dosage, and added potassium supplements. This has worked really well for me, but I know that high BP can stem from more than low potassium, though there are many potassium sparing BP meds. out there.

    I agree with folks who believe that inflammation is a cause of many conditions, especially cardiovascular ones. With inflammation, there can be plaque build up, then increased BP. The supplements you're taking look good for reducing plaque. ( I tend to eat more fat though...good butter for K2.) You probably know this, but I'm just checking; keeping fasting blood glucose as close to 80 as possible is another good way to prevent inflammation. I've been able to keep mine below 90, but I recently read that 80 is ideal. (difficult) ( I read this in a brochure written by Earl Mindell. It was at my mother's house. I didn't know he was still so active. Good news!)

    I'll have a look to see if I can find anything else about this.
     
  16. triffid113

    triffid113 Day of the Square Peg

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    No but I found this one that is at least high-ish dose: http://www.iherb.com/product-review...nced-Series-Peak-K2-90-Veggie-Caps/33052/?p=1 ($42.84 for 90 caps)
    It is 15mg. And here is what the reviewers say!:

    I purchased this to round up all that calcium in my body and in my arteries and deposit it in my bones. Two things: OMG! It removed ALL of the plaque from my teeth. Seriously, I read about that somewhere and thought it was a load of bunk. This stuff works. My left hip and lower back do not hurt any longer. Its been 11 years since I've been able to sleep on my left side. My dentist is going to freak out during my next dental exam later this month. How I took it: 3 x a day with meals. + Calcium Orate 3 x a day with meals. (85mg each) This is about 95% absorbable, unlike other forms Calcium that are from 15% to 65% absorbable. + Vitamin D3 2000IU 3 x a day with meals. + Nutribiotic Meta-C 500mg 3 x a day with meals.

    Recommended by my doctor, who is currently doing K2 MK-4 research with rodents. The rodents live up to 50% longer.

    The only active form of vitamin K. Whitens teeth removes plaque and lowers bp

    P.S. I do not agree with the reviewer above who is taking calcium w/o magnesium. I NEVER take them separately. I think taking calcium w/o magnesium is what leads to the heath problems of calcium consumption. The two minerals are needed in a ratio. IO take them in a 1:1 ratio.
     
  17. triffid113

    triffid113 Day of the Square Peg

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    Michigan
    Thanks Cruz. I haven't read the article above yet. But I wanted to say that my bp is running between 150/90 to 170/94 (which means my normal supplements are having some effect because my bp can go way higher). However my bp DOES NOT RETURN TO NORMAL OVERNIGHT. Which is extremely serious and indicated clogged arteries I believe. My fasting glucose is never ever above 83...(I tend to hypoglycemia). I have 3 genes that cause high blood pressure but now I am going to add more to the list because I have as yet unidentified genes that make me susceptible to allergies and there seems to be an allergy tie to high bp as well via the thyroid. Hypothyroid lowers GFR (kidney function). I am trying to treat hypothyroid now but it is causing hypoglycemia. Also I am afraid to take potassium when I am not so sure my kidneys are functioning well. marginal kidneys cannot excrete potassium. I am retaining water by day and taking all night to pee it out. Although to be fair I seem to not be retaining so much water now that the weather is warming up, but although my allergies have recovered due to the humidity rise, I am having great difficulty getting my bp to recover. Based on the above I am pinning my hopes on MK4.
     
  18. Crux

    Crux Senior Member

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    USA
    triffid113

    Hi;
    So it looks like Vitamin D may be involved with hypertension and atherosclerosis.
    http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0054625
    But for vitamin D to be utilized, the co-factors: vitamin K ( K2 most active), magnesium, zinc, and boron need to be present in good supply.

    There's a thread about K2, started by Asklipia, where people were comparing types and brands of K2... may be worth a look. It includes some discussion about MK4 vs MK7.

    I see you've already been over on that thread... anyway, I hope the MK4 works for you.
     
  19. ninauae

    ninauae

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    :angel: Thanks for all your answers :thumbsup: and today I did phone consultation with Doctor Shawn Bean of MTHFR. He listened to me for 2 1/2 hours and review all my test results since my hair calcium and mag is high so he recommend to start slowly with Magnesium glycinate. He told me that it will bring my Vit D levels up since its hard for me to tolerate Vit D.
    He will fix my CBS issues and same time I need to add sea salt in my diet since my body is retaining fluids. My Rhythm plus reveal that I have low progesterone and high melatonin.
    Same time another test says i have low serotonin may be because of MAO A gene blockage as my body cannot break 5 HTP as well.
    Let see how things will move forward and this time about my weight loss issues.
     
    Crux likes this.
  20. sianrecovery

    sianrecovery Senior Member

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    Manchester UK
    This is a fascinating thread, thanks everyone. I have a kidney disease, inherited, and I have osteoporosis, and my kidneys are calcifying, and I have lots of stones...I also have long term infections, and some are biofilm related. It does make it hard to get the balance right. I went on thyroid meds about a year ago, and have found them helpful. These papers are great.
    I did the Yasko test about a year ago, at the same time as a HLA DR genotype - the results of that overshadowed the yasko one, and I never really assimiliated its significance. I will go back and see what I can learn.
    Thanks!
     

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