1. Patients launch $1.27 million crowdfunding campaign for ME/CFS gut microbiome study.
    Check out the website, Facebook and Twitter. Join in donate and spread the word!
9th Invest in ME International ME Conference, 2014 - Part 1: Autoimmunity and ME
Mark Berry begins a series of articles on the 9th Invest in ME International ME Conference in London, with a look at three presentations on autoimmunity
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Do You Have Fibromyalgia

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia' started by livingwithcfids, Dec 3, 2011.

?

Do You Have Fibromyalgia?

  1. Yes

    14 vote(s)
    70.0%
  2. No

    4 vote(s)
    20.0%
  3. Not Sure

    2 vote(s)
    10.0%
  1. livingwithcfids

    livingwithcfids

    Messages:
    75
    Likes:
    7
    I'm certain 99.9% of you know the definition of Fibromyalgia but just in case...
    Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain accompanied by fatigue, sleep, memory and mood issues. Researchers believe that fibromyalgia amplifies painful sensations by affecting the way your brain processes pain signals.Symptoms sometimes begin after a physical trauma, surgery, infection or significant psychological stress. In other cases, symptoms gradually accumulate over time with no single triggering event.

    The pain associated with fibromyalgia often is described as a constant dull ache, typically arising from muscles. To be considered widespread, the pain must occur on both sides of your body and above and below your waist.Fibromyalgia is characterized by additional pain when firm pressure is applied to specific areas of your body, called tender points.People with fibromyalgia often awaken tired, even though they report sleeping for long periods of time. Sleep is frequently disrupted by pain, and many patients with fibromyalgia have other sleep disorders, such as restless legs syndrome and sleep apnea, that further worsen symptoms.

    FM can not and will never be diagnosed by a blood test. Analysis of the brain and spinal fluid is the only certain way to have an absolute understanding of this illness. The technology is there, it's only a matter of time before the diagnostic tests reach the universal platform.
     
  2. ggingues

    ggingues $10 gift code at iHerb GAS343 of $40

    Messages:
    4,089
    Likes:
    912
    Concord, NH
    What are you hoping to learn from this?

    GG
     
  3. Tony Mach

    Tony Mach Show me the evidence.

    Messages:
    146
    Likes:
    34
    Upper Palatinate, Bavaria
    Alan Light has found gene-expression differences in blood cells between FM patients and controls, with regards to receptors that sense pain and fatigue. FM could be very well diagnosed by blood test. So it is not simply that "normal" levels of pain (and fatigue) are amplified in the brain of FM patients FM patients HAVE a higher level of pain, same as ME/CFS patients.

    I would call the "central sensitization in FM patients" theory to be idealistic BS from scientists (and I am using the term very loosely) who have a hard time letting go of the "it is all in the brain" paradigm, just because they don't know what they should look for and how to do it.
     
  4. Francelle

    Francelle Senior Member

    Messages:
    444
    Likes:
    15
    Victoria, Australia
    I agree. I have always considered this pain sensitisation/amplification theory to be fanciful to say the least. As I see it the underlying premise of that theory then is that ALL people have pain ALL the time but they just don't feel it because they don't have this heightened pain sensitisation which we have. If that were true this must therefore mean that significant pain is generated during NORMAL functioning of the human body. Additionally if ALL people have this awful pain all the time but don't feel it, then what makes them feel it when something does go wrong in their body, like an injury or infection? It doesn't seem like a feasible argument to me.

    I would say that I have about four or five types of pain most of the time. There is neuropathic pain (24/7 burning pain), muscle pain/constant aching, stiffness of muscles (like I have climbed a mountain even after minimal walking), stabbing joint pain. I don't believe I have the tender points to the degree that is talked about - although they are NOT now meant to be used for diagnostic purposes.
     
  5. livingwithcfids

    livingwithcfids

    Messages:
    75
    Likes:
    7
    Is this what you are referring to? http://www.offerutah.org/Alanlight2011.htm
    Central sensitization is the fundamental argument for supporting the mechanism behind migraine headaches, and I'm sure you wouldn't call that idealistic BS. Drugs have been developed that counteract this phenomenon. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3qFJNRuOVU
    And I still feel strongly that FM won't be diagnosed by a blood test any time soon (10 years at least) but rather by f-mri and spinal taps. Based on personal experience, I've had tons of bloodwork, ranging from basic to very specific, and all have failed to find anything. My blood is clean and my muscle tissue is fine. The problem lies in the brain. A lot of solid research focuses around brain chemicals and hormones.

    Changes in brain chemicals -- Some people with fibromyalgia have abnormal levels of brain chemicals called neurotransmitters. Specifically, they have low levels of serotonin, which affects mood, promotes sleep, and helps reduce the perception of pain. They often have high levels of substance P, which transmits the "pain message" to the brain.
    Disregulation of the autonomic nervous system -- The autonomic nervous system releases hormones that affect how you react to stress. Some doctors think people with fibromyalgia release these hormones differently when they experience stress, and the hormones affect the perception of pain.
    Sleep problems -- The majority of people with fibromyalgia report sleep problems, and especially have trouble with stage 4 sleep, the most restful stage in which the body repairs itself. Some doctors believe that the lack of restful sleep means that the muscles of people with fibromyalgia are not able to repair the tiny tears and trauma that occur everyday, leading to muscle pain and fatigue. Other doctors believe that sleep problems are a result, not a cause, of fibromyalgia.
     
  6. mellster

    mellster Marco

    Messages:
    800
    Likes:
    179
    San Francisco
    I agree with livingwithcfids here, and not just regarding FM, for the reason that serology is fairly advanced now and has been the main focus of researchers trying to find a distinguished marker for CFS/FM/ME for so many years now with little success. It could very well be that the majority of these conditions plays out in tissue anywhere in the body rather than on the blood. Just a hypothesis, but I don't think it's BS. It would be nice to have a simple blood test detect it, but that begs the question why it has not been discovered yet, given the amount of blood drawn from patients. Now if you ask how many tissue samples have been taken so far, I think the answer would be few and far between, just because it is far more inconvenient, invasive and expensive. cheers
     
  7. Sushi

    Sushi Moderator and Senior Member Albuquerque

    Messages:
    7,081
    Likes:
    6,042
    Albuquerque
    I can't vote in this poll cause there isn't a category that fits.

    I had fibro, but after some treatment with an autonomic specialist it went away.:thumbsup:

    Sushi
     
  8. hensue

    hensue Senior Member

    Messages:
    269
    Likes:
    1
    your fibro went totally away??? no pain? That is awesome as I sit here now freaking hurting all over. Is your main symptom now severe fatigue?? Who was the autonomic specialist?

    Thanks
    Susie
     
  9. SaraM

    SaraM Senior Member

    Messages:
    502
    Likes:
    18
    May I ask what the treatment was, and if you can give me the name of this doc?
     
  10. Sushi

    Sushi Moderator and Senior Member Albuquerque

    Messages:
    7,081
    Likes:
    6,042
    Albuquerque
    Yeah, it all went away. I don't know which part of the treatment did it, but it seemed like it was medication that raised the level of norepinephrine in the synapses--i.e. SNRI's.

    My autonomic specialist is in North Florida. He "lost" his position as a hospital internist due to having ME/CFS himself, with the main symptoms being autonomic. He went back to medical school to study the autonomic system and began treating patients a couple of days a week. His own health prevents him seeing a lot of patients though, so he might not be a good option as a doctor.

    However, you might look into the type of meds I mentioned. The one I noticed the big difference with was strattera. Again, some things work for some and not for others.

    Good luck,
    Sushi
     
  11. Lee Ann

    Lee Ann

    Messages:
    83
    Likes:
    7
    Tennessee
    I don't have fibro. The crushing fatigue is my main life sucker.
     

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page