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Disease Tolerance as a Defense Strategy - 2012 article

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by natasa778, Feb 12, 2014.

  1. natasa778

    natasa778 Senior Member

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    London UK
    Just came across this paper, looks very intriguing and discusses a few interesting concepts that I haven't seen mentioned on forums but could be relevant to ME ...

    Free access


    alex3619 and Valentijn like this.
  2. lansbergen

    lansbergen Senior Member

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    In my opion it is ridiculous to call an asymptomatic infection disease tolerance

    http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/disease
  3. natasa778

    natasa778 Senior Member

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    have you read the whole article? I still haven\t finished but think that would be missing the point .. .
  4. lansbergen

    lansbergen Senior Member

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    Pathogen tolerance is an old and much better term.

    When there are no sighns and symptoms there is no disease.
  5. anciendaze

    anciendaze Senior Member

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    Please note, everyone, that there is a very fine line between inside and outside the body. If your mucous membranes were spread out flat they would cover many square meters, yet the difference between inside and outside is only a few cells thick. The old idea of the immune system distinguishing between "self" and "non-self" is inadequate for dealing with this. The context in which a pathogen occurs is extremely important. If you have e. coli in your gut, right next to capillaries, that is normal, and necessary for some digestive processes. If e. coli shows up inside the bloodstream it should be attacked immediately. You can tolerate helicobacter pylori inside your stomach, unless there is tissue damage resulting in an ulcer. About half the human race has h. pylori in its stomach without ulcers.

    Immune systems respond to multiple clues to indicate a pathogen is present and causing damage. When organisms do not cause damage to host cells they will most often be tolerated. You need to remember that bacterial cells outnumber human cells in your body, and most viruses, fungi, etc. in your gut, bladder, lungs or sinuses are in a constant battle to keep other species from taking over. Those that target human host cells are likely to come to a bad end. The majority of pathogens inside you are not doing this, they are going after other organisms you would consider human pathogens. If your body ever decides to go after all "other" organisms in there, you will feel deathly ill, if you survive.

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