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Discuss SNP rs1464510 Celiac, gliadin, gluten related SNP

Discussion in 'Genetic Testing and SNPs' started by roxie60, Feb 13, 2013.

  1. roxie60

    roxie60 Senior Member

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    Curious if anyone has their SNP rs1464510 info, I am AA on 23andMe. Anyone know if this is the risk allele? Is AA and TT always the risk allele? TIA
  2. Dreambirdie

    Dreambirdie work in progress

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    I am AA, and clueless about what this means...?

    I am used to thinking in terms of + - and not in terms of letters.
  3. roxie60

    roxie60 Senior Member

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    I understand :confused:. Trying to find out if AA is +/+ or -/- .
  4. Dreambirdie

    Dreambirdie work in progress

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    I hope someone has answer.

    Yooo---hoooo! Anybody here? We're lost in the wilderness of alleles. o_O
  5. roxie60

    roxie60 Senior Member

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  6. Dreambirdie

    Dreambirdie work in progress

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    So AA essentially means ++ which makes sense.

    I do think I am gluten sensitive. I haven't eaten it for a long while.
  7. drex13

    drex13 Senior Member

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    I'm Hetero, AC, for whatever that's worth.
  8. roxie60

    roxie60 Senior Member

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    I am also gluten/gliadin sensitive but my blood celiac test was negative (of course my blood never shows much of anything). Neurologist said the celiac blood test is about 20-30% false negative - this however is not what i found in pubmed? their info said the false neg was about 1%, big difference, I have lost faith in Drs so it doesnt matter).

    Hi drex13, could just mean you carry one gene that 'might' make you gluten sensitive.
  9. snowathlete

    snowathlete

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    snap.
    negative celiacs blood test too.
  10. Phred

    Phred Senior Member

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    I have Celiac. <waves frantically> I came up hetero AC as well on this test. There are 22 or 23 genes associated with Celiac though. 23andme only tests one.

    roxie60 the 20 - 30% false negative your neurologist quoted is probably about right. Doctor's love to only test Igg or IgA antibodies. Then they don't check to see if the IgA is low. If it's low already you'll get a false negative. My doc only checked Igg. I didn't have the antibodies. I was diagnosed through endoscopy (found villous atrophy) and positive response to gluten free diet. Doctors need to do a FULL Celiac panel to rule out the disease and that is far too often not done.

    Also Celiac is genetic, but it's triggered. So if you have the gene, but it hasn't been triggered yet, you're not making antibodies. If you're not making the antibodies it won't show up on blood work.

    That's my quick lesson on Celiac. There's also NCGI (non celiac gluten intolerant) and fun stuff like gluten ataxia. Hope that's all clear as mud. :)
    merylg and roxie60 like this.
  11. roxie60

    roxie60 Senior Member

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    so far it looks like we are batting 100% - if people have one or two of the risk allele 'A' they are reporting being Celiac or gluten sensitive (unless I misread anyones post, apologies if I did ).
  12. Skyline

    Skyline Senior Member

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    I'm CC - and seem to have issues with gluten. I'm currently exploring that being a mold related biotoxin issue and the immune response.
  13. roxie60

    roxie60 Senior Member

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  14. roxie60

    roxie60 Senior Member

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  15. roxie60

    roxie60 Senior Member

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  16. MogMog

    MogMog

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    I am trying to find out if I have coeliac disease or am gluten intolerant. I am going to get the 23 and Me test done sometime but I am also considering the gluten gene test from Kimball Labs:

    http://www.kimballgenetics.com/files/Celiac_HLA_DQA-DQB_flyer_2013.pdf

    Am I right that I will get more genetic information on gluten/coeliac from this Kimball test than from the 23andme test?
  17. Valentijn

    Valentijn Activity Level: 3

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    23andMe is pretty bad for testing HLA types. But even HLA type isn't completely determinative of having celiac or gluten intolerance. Blood testing and/or biopsy is probably needed for celiac, and IgA testing and food elimination trial is probably needed to determine gluten intolerance.
    MogMog likes this.
  18. ukxmrv

    ukxmrv Senior Member

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    I saw this posted to Facebook recently on the "Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Research Center at Stanford University" page

    And here is our first Question and Answer post!!

    Question: What are possible examples of findings that could be found in this type of research and how could this translate to validating the illness and lead to future treatments?

    Answer from Dr. Davis: One example of findings is from genetic analysis. If we can find gene variants that are more common in CFS than non-CFS or other diseases, then the altered function of these versions of the genes may increase the chances of onset of CFS. This could tell us who is at greater risk. It could also give clues for treatment. We are sequencing the DNA of the HLA region from patients with CFS (and controls). The sequence of the HLA region often predicts susceptibility to disease.
    MogMog likes this.
  19. MogMog

    MogMog

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    My IgA is low (0.5) so I worry that a lot of the blood testing for coeliac will be inaccurate. I had a negative on the coeliac test my GP did, but it is IgA based. I tried to get an IgG test but GP said no, that the IgA test result was okay because my IgA was low but not deficient. Don't know if that's right or not. I'm going to ask for the biopsy but I doubt that he is going to agree - despite my gut symptoms which he is ignoring.
    Are there any other private tests accurate for coeliac / gluten intolerance, not based on IgA?
    Enterolab does a faecal fat absorption test that's supposed to show villi damage, presumably an alternative to a biopsy?
  20. nandixon

    nandixon Senior Member

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    Some of the SNPs 23andMe tests for correspond to "tagging" SNPs for the HLA genes that relate to celiac disease. Thus you can use your SNP results to strongly infer your HLA results. See this SNPedia link and the references contained within for a list of the SNPs:

    http://www.snpedia.com/index.php/Celiac_disease
    MogMog and Valentijn like this.

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