The power and pitfalls of omics part 2: epigenomics, transcriptomics and ME/CFS
Simon McGrath concludes his blog about the remarkable Prof George Davey Smith's smart ideas for understanding diseases, which may soon be applied to ME/CFS.
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Discovery on microbiome bacteria that decrease inflammation and regulate immune response

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS Discussion' started by Antares in NYC, Mar 17, 2015.

  1. Antares in NYC

    Antares in NYC Senior Member

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    Pretty amazing article on the discovery of the function of F. prausnitzii and clostridial clusters found in the gut microbiome that are directly linked to inflammation and the regulation of human immune response. The article suggests these specific bugs may help treat and control Chron's and other auto-immune conditions.
    Great read:

     
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  2. hopeful2

    hopeful2

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    I read this entire article earlier and found it fascinating. I have a lot of gut issues with my ME/CFS. I find this whole subject very interesting. After reading the article I'm wondering if it would be beneficial for me to increase my soluble fiber in my diet as it sounds like it feeds some of the beneficial bacteria. Of course that's assuming I have some of the beneficial bacteria in my gut to feed.
     
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  3. Gamboa

    Gamboa Senior Member

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    Very interesting. I took antibiotics for acne from age 13 to 25 and then again periodically for another 5 years. I always wonder what that did to my gut flora.
     
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  4. snowathlete

    snowathlete

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    Why not test with uBiome or American Gut and find out?
    My uBiome test showed 20% F. prausnitzii so not sure what to make of this. I have another more recent test outstanding.
     
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  5. Gamboa

    Gamboa Senior Member

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    I could do that but would end up in the same boat as you: " not sure what to make of this". I'm not sure at this point if knowing the identity of my gut flora will help if we don't know what they do or don't do. I will definitely do it once some of the upcoming studies, such as Dr. Lipkin's, are out and we perhaps know a bit more.

    Having said that, of course now I am curious. How reliable are these tests at this point in time? What are the costs?
     
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  6. adreno

    adreno PR activist

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    A few of us have started experimenting with clostridium butyricum, which is used in Japan to prevent c. Difficile infections. It's too early to speak of any effects, though.

    Resistant starch is essential for feeding Clostridia species, and several of us are experimenting with this, as well as other fibers, too.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2015
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  7. Debbie23

    Debbie23 Senior Member

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    I'm on a long term antibiotic now for acne and to prevent recurrent boils. I've been on different ones for a long time, I often worry if it could be messing up my gut but if I stop taking it my skin kind of 'explodes'. :(
     
  8. snowathlete

    snowathlete

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    Some things are easier to interpret than others, some have been researched a lot and others less so. In my case, 9 months of antibiotics almost entirely destroyed some genus of bacteria, and I am working on improving that. My abx resulted in me getting ulcerative coltis as well and I am slowly coming out of my second flare at the moment, thankfully, by taking a good probiotic. Not many on the market else there are a bunch of others that I'd love to take.

    How reliable are they? Hard to say for sure to be honest. From what I've seen of other people's results, uBiome look better than Agut. But I have only just sent my second sample in myself. I have an idea of what it should show, but we'll see.

    It is pretty cheap for what it is, in my opinion. $89 with uBiome. Not sure on price of Agut but similar. uBiome also sometimes have sales like BOGOF (they did around christmas) and I think I got a 10% off voucher the other day in my email, if anyone is interested.
     
  9. Gondwanaland

    Gondwanaland Senior Member

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    My face was just llike that for several years: http://deliciouslyorganic.net/reverse-hashimotos-thyroid-disease/
    and got worse after I began a whole grain diet. I was on accutane for a while, it helped for some time and then came all back. When I went gluten free (and consequently folic acid free as well) my face improved at least 70%. Then after a short course of Flagyl in September 2013 it went away and didn't come back.
     
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  10. Debbie23

    Debbie23 Senior Member

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    That's very interesting, thank you.
     
  11. piccirilli

    piccirilli

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    Expansion on this topic and related research found here:
    https://www.gdx.net/livegdx//human-gut-microbiome
    I'm still trying to wrap my head around this info... Be sure to listen to the Q&A at end, although entire audio/ power point is excellent.
     
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  12. jepps

    jepps Senior Member

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    My latest Ubiome result also shows high F. prausnitzii: 17594 Faecalibacterium (2.55%) and 16645 F. prausnitzii (2.4 %), so together 5 %.The last test 33 in Mai showed only 33 Faecalib (0,002%)., and 8 F.prausnitzii (0,0005%).
     
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  13. perrier

    perrier Senior Member

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    Is it possible to buy F prausnitzi as a probiotic supplement?
     
  14. JPV

    JPV ɹǝqɯǝɯ ɹoıuǝs

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    The problem is, a lot of these bacteria are just not currently available in probiotic form. In the case of F. prausnitzii, since it dies when it comes in contact with oxygen, there will probably never be a probiotic made anyway. However, it does sounds like there are other strategies that can be employed to help increase it's numbers...
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2015
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  15. AndyPandy

    AndyPandy Making the most of it

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    A relative took antibiotics for acne as a teenager and developed ulcerative colitis
     

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