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Differences in Physical and Psychosocial Characteristics Between CFS and Fatigued Non-CFS Patients

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by voner, Feb 21, 2016.

  1. voner

    voner Senior Member

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    Differences in Physical and Psychosocial Characteristics Between CFS and Fatigued Non-CFS Patients, a Case-Control Study.
    De Gucht V1, Garcia FK2, den Engelsman M2, Maes S2.

    Abstract
    PURPOSE:
    The main research question is: "Do CFS patients differ from fatigued non-CFS patients with respect to physical, cognitive, behavioral, social, and emotional determinants?" In addition, group differences in relevant outcomes were explored.

    METHOD:
    Patients who met the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) criteria for CFS were categorized as CFS; these patients were mainly recruited via a large Dutch patient organization. Primary care patients who were fatigued for at least 1 month and up to 2 years but did not meet the CDC criteria were classified as fatigued non-CFS patients. Both groups were matched by age and gender (Nā€‰=ā€‰192 for each group).

    RESULTS:
    CFS patients attributed their fatigue more frequently to external causes, reported a worse physical functioning, more medical visits, and a lower employment rate. The results of a multiple logistic regression analysis showed that patients who believe that their fatigue is associated with more severe consequences, that their fatigue will last longer and is responsible for more additional symptoms are more likely to be classified as CFS, while patients who are more physically active and have higher levels of "all or nothing behavior" are less likely to be classified as having CFS.

    CONCLUSION:
    A longitudinal study should explore the predictive value of the above factors for the transition from medically unexplained fatigue to CFS in order to develop targeted interventions for primary care patients with short-term fatigue complaints.

    KEYWORDS:
    Behavioral regulation pattern; Chronic fatigue syndrome; Fatigue; Illness representations; Matched case-control; Psychosocial characteristics

    .......published in the International Journal of Behavioural Medicine, Feb 19, 2016......

    I tried to find the full paper, but I could not find it. perhaps someone else can...??
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2016
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  2. Bob

    Bob

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  3. Anika

    Anika Senior Member

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  4. user9876

    user9876 Senior Member

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    Its poor

    They read in causality to correlation. Basically they seem to have prejudged certain directional relationships that they wish to get and then allocated some questionnaires as 'determinants' and some as 'outcomes' and decided that determinants cause outcomes - although no justification is given for the choices.

    On a minor points. They diagnose through questionnaires. They seem to have two sources of patients one from a patient group and one from a primary care source but as far as I could see they don't describe the primary care source.
     
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  5. Keela Too

    Keela Too Sally Burch

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    I can't help but feel there is a sort of paper generating scheme going on here. Produce loads of papers that can be cited, and keep citing them around and around. None show anything really new about ME but build into the myth that there is nothing much more than a vague set of symptoms that the patients misconstrue to claim they are ill. I can't bear to open this. But suspect from above that that is what it is about. Meh..
     
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  6. Effi

    Effi Senior Member

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    some background info on the names on this paper:

    all from Leiden University in The Netherlands - faculty of Health, Medical and Neuropsychology.

    * Veronique de Gucht, assistant professor
    * Stan Maes is this guy

    The two others don't seem to work there anymore. From what I'm gathering online they had some sort of a temporary freelance research position?

    I agree with @Keela Too : paper generating scheme.
     
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  7. soti

    soti Senior Member

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    Wow, "the transition from medically unexplained fatigue to CFS". What an assumption!
     
  8. JohnCB

    JohnCB Immoderate

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    This is just a guess but could these two be students? There is a lot of stuff churned out by psychology departments where students do questionnaire based research of dubious quality. Some of it gets rewritten as journal articles.
     
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  9. Effi

    Effi Senior Member

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    That though crossed my mind too, but I didn't know students' work gets published sometimes. It sure looks like a student level paper, so maybe you're right!
     
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  10. valentinelynx

    valentinelynx Senior Member

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    Agree. That appears to be the whole assumption behind this study - that "medically unexplained fatigue" somehow is a precursor for the disease CFS. The statement that "patients who believe that their fatigue is associated with more severe consequences, that their fatigue will last longer and is responsible for more additional symptoms are more likely to be classified as CFS" also indicates that the researchers think that "fatigue" is the disease, not another symptom

    This so-called research is *&^%.
     
  11. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Babble in, babble out. Pure BIBO to me.
     
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  12. Justin30

    Justin30 Senior Member

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    Does anyone one want to list what causes fatigue:

    - Stress
    - obesity
    - not enough sleep
    - poor diet

    And the list goes on and on and on and on now when you have ME on the other hand you have something a bit different....

    You literally cant move, even when you want to almost like paralysis, your brain does not function or have the ability to cognitively process information like brain death, you are hollow but alive!
     
  13. Woolie

    Woolie Senior Member

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    Yea, like there must be some sort of "transition". It started pretty abruptly for many of us. The "transition" was entirely artificial: happened when we reached the six month mark and therefore qualified for the formal diagnosis.
     
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