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detox pathways for air pollution?

Discussion in 'Detox: Methylation; B12; Glutathione; Chelation' started by ebethc, Nov 20, 2015.

  1. ebethc

    ebethc Senior Member

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    the air pollution in winter kills me... and i'm already prone to S.A.D., so I'm not in good shape...

    What are the pathways for detoxing air pollution & particulate matter? Is it a liver detox strategy? (NAC, milk thistle, ALA) thanks.
     
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  2. Aerose91

    Aerose91 Senior Member

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    As far as i know the body cant tell the difference between different forms of "stress" (i.e. environmental, physical, emotional etc) so i dont know if there would be a particular pathway just for toxins that are breathed in. I wouod assume your general methylation and liver, bowel detox methods would be the trick.
     
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  3. Aerose91

    Aerose91 Senior Member

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    Have you investigated coffee enemas? I know the concept doesnt seem too fun but in all the years I've been taking stuff to detox my liver this is the only thing that has had even the slightest effect, and ive just recently started.
     
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  4. ebethc

    ebethc Senior Member

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    I've done that once or twice, but I didn't notice much of a difference... It seems like it should be great for me, but the whole colonic / enema / coffee enema therapy has not panned out for me..
     
  5. Aerose91

    Aerose91 Senior Member

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    I think its something that needs to be done regularly, i dont think 1 or 2 are going to be a world changer. Hell, people with cancer do 6-7 a day! I dont feel noticably better after doing one but it would make sense that over time the freeing of toxins from your liver would start to show some effect. I dont remember who it was, but i read a quote from a doctor saying that in doing 1 or 2 coffee enemas per day for a year or two can clear a lifetime of toxins from your liver. I believe in taking periodic breaks but that sounds pretty tempting to me.

    Have you maybe also looked into infared light therapy? Besides just being good for detoxing it can be really useful for some in helping SAD by mimicking some of the spectrum of sunlight.
     
  6. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    If you are referring to indoor air pollution in the home, formaldehyde from central heating is a major contributor.

    NASA research showed that certain house plants can absorb and remove formaldehyde (and other airborne toxins) from the indoor air.
     
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  7. ebethc

    ebethc Senior Member

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    thanks, @Hip

    I have radiator heat, and live in a temperate climate..... I believe that's it's an outdoor pollution problem
     
  8. jason30

    jason30 Senior Member

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    Good point Hip, especially for people with MCS (like me!).

    About outdoor pollution, there can be a lot of different things. Mostly the molds in the air gives complaints.
    And don't forget the dust mites, in this period there are a lot more dust mites than in any other period of the year.

    Like Areose said, look into liver and methylation. Especially liver phase 2 which is responsible of processing the most chemicals.
     
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  9. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    I actually bought a large areca palm plant, around 3 foot high, which I keep in the computer room where I stay most of the day. This is one of the top pollution-absorbing plants, according to the NASA research, and works particularly well because it is a large plant with a large leaf area (the larger the leaf area, the more it absorbs toxins).

    Since installing this plant, I have felt noticeably less groggy during the winter months (when the windows remain closed, the central heating is on high, and thus indoor toxin levels build up).
     
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  10. Aerose91

    Aerose91 Senior Member

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    Thats awesome that you notice a difference from a plant. I bought a HEPA filter and didn't even notice too much difference. Nature is always on point
     
  11. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    A HEPA filter will remove airborne particles, but not toxic gases like formaldehyde. But a plant like the areca will suck in and destroy formaldehyde.


    Areca palms look very nice as well, and they are usually very cheap to buy. My 3 foot plant was less that £20.

    From the NASA research, they are the best absorber of xylene and toluene from the indoor air, and pretty good at absorbing formaldehyde too.

    You have to provide a good supply of light for the plant, though, because the leaf's absorption of toxins from the air depends on light.
     
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  12. Aerose91

    Aerose91 Senior Member

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    Being a palm is it a warm weather only plant? Could this thing make it through the winter in a climate controlled house? Hell if its that effective id make my house look like an effing rainforest, lol
     
  13. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    I am in the UK, and my house is kept at 20ºC in the winter by central heating, and my areca plant does very well. Grows like crazy, in fact.
     
  14. jason30

    jason30 Senior Member

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    I already have the boston ferm but I am buying the areca palm plant this afternoon as well, the plant looks really nice!
    Do you know if this plant release pollen?
    When the plant absorbs the toxins, what happens with those toxins? Is it necessary to clean or replace the plant once in a while?
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2015
  15. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    I have never seen any flowers on my areca palm, and I have had it a few years. But know very little about plants and horticulture. I was originally going to get a Boston fern, but these tend to require higher humidity (so they do well in bathrooms, but not so well in dry, centrally heated rooms, unless you spray the leaves with water daily).

    Toxins such as formaldehyde, xylene and toluene are organic compounds, and I believe they are continuously broken down within the plant leaves. They do not accumulate in the plant.



    If you Google search on: NASA houseplants formaldehyde, you will find lots of articles on air pollution-removing houseplants. Here are some articles:

    This Graphic Shows the Best Air-Cleaning Plants, According to NASA

    Top 10 NASA Approved Houseplants for Improving Indoor Air Quality - DIY & Crafts

    NASA Clean Air Study - Wikipedia

    Remember, the larger the plant and the more leaf area it has, the more toxins it will break down. So a tiny plant that is just 4 inches high won't do much. You will get more toxin removal with a larger plant.

    Note that the areca palm does not break down benzene, but I bought it because it is a large, cheap plant that is easy to look after, and good at removing formaldehyde.
     
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  16. jason30

    jason30 Senior Member

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    Thanks Hip, good to know that there are no flowers on it and that a tiny plant won't do much.
    The areca palm is indeed a cheap plant, that plus removing formaldehyde makes it one of my favorite plants for my MCS.
    Thanks again!
     
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  17. ebethc

    ebethc Senior Member

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    I have a decent air cleaner, but maybe I need a better one... I have a blueair hepa unit that doesn't seem to do much on bad pollution days like this week...
     

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