When the 'Holiday Season' Is No Holiday at all for Those With ME/CFS
Is December getting to you? Jody Smith shares some thoughts on some of the struggles that all too often attend this time of year ...
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Derya Unutmaz t-cell findings and gut connection

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS News' started by Murph, Dec 11, 2017.

  1. Murph

    Murph :)

    Messages:
    724
    Likes:
    3,482
    Cort has written this excellent piece, including some huge tidbits on t-cell research from Unutmaz.


    https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2017/12/09/me-cfs-researcher-patients-shine-nih-call/ it is way more interesting than the title suggests....

    The next five paragraphs are excerpts of Cort's blog post.

    in response to a great question during the Q&A period, Unutmaz revealed that the most provocative findings found were in the T-cells, and that the findings have proved to be highly reproducible – something we’ve rarely seen outside of NK cells (cousins, it should be pointed out, to T-cells) – in the immune field in ME/CFS.

    the T-cell abnormalities Unutmaz is finding are associated with the gut probably made Mady Hornig and Ian Lipkin – champions of the role that the gut may play in ME/CFS – smile. It turns out that the problematic T-cells Unutmaz is finding regulate gut functioning. Either something in the guts of ME/CFS patients is messing with the regulatory T-cells or the gut T-cells are simply sitting down on their job. Either way, Unutmaz’ findings appear to put an enhanced focus on the gut in ME/CFS.

    he gut is a terribly complex place, but with more and more research focusing on it and new methods being developed to understand it, a central problem in the gut might not be a bad thing at all to find in ME/CFS. Unutmaz echoed that hope when he stated that much is known about the cells he’s finding problems in and many treatments are under development to deal with them. That’s very good news for a disease that’s seemed particularly good at featuring issues with cells about which not much is known.

    Unutmaz said he’ll be following up his T-cell study with a deep and rigorous probe of the gut bacteria in ME/CFS. He won’t just determine which bacteria are there – he’ll actually stress ME/CFS patients to see how their gut bacteria react. His studies will generate a lot of data; the challenge with them, as with all “omics” studies, will be to separate the wheat from the chaff.

    Unutmaz is also working with Precisely to develop an app to collect clinical data worldwide on ME/CFS patients. We’ve heard of projects like this before, but this may be the first one that has the funding to come to fruition.
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2017
    RYO, Ema, ljimbo423 and 21 others like this.
  2. dreampop

    dreampop Senior Member

    Messages:
    244
    Likes:
    564
    Finally info on the Unutmaz finding. My first question is, is it a function of SIBO/decreased diversity etc? In which case it might not be as promising. My second question would be, is it involved in the pathology? Obviously unanswerable at the moment.

    I have been hesitant of ME/CFS models that center on the gut, but this might be a new thing altogether.

    The final question I guess, is what kind of T-Cells, since some research shows quite a few kinds of t-cells have gut-specific versions. We know they regulate gut functioning, but that could probably be said about most of them in some way or another. @Cort maybe has more details?
     
    ScottTriGuy likes this.
  3. Jesse2233

    Jesse2233 Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,926
    Likes:
    5,048
    Southern California
    interesting... I wonder how T-cells and gut bacteria interact
     
  4. Webdog

    Webdog Senior Member

    Having a sibling who died of T-Cell (non-Hodgkin) lymphoma at age 26, I’ve long suspected aberrant T-cells might play a role in my ME/CFS.
     
  5. Gemini

    Gemini Senior Member

    Messages:
    701
    Likes:
    1,278
    East Coast USA
    @Jesse2233 a recent discovery in cancer immunotherapy research ties specific gut bacteria[species] to T-cell functioning ultimately impacting cancer drug effectiveness in patients.

    In a specific case the A.muciniphila species associated with the gut's mucus lining causes the cytokine IL12 to be released which primes T-cells and improves patient's response to PD-1 blocker drugs.

    http://forums.phoenixrising.me/inde...munotherapy-drug-response-thru-t-cells.56571/

    The level of detail in this research down to bacteria species is impressive. Maybe the efforts of Unutmaz, Mark Davis, Lipkin and others studying the microbiome and/or T-cells in ME/CFS will be too and similarly lead to treatments.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2017
    anni66, Jesse2233, Murph and 2 others like this.
  6. ljimbo423

    ljimbo423 Senior Member

    Messages:
    780
    Likes:
    1,337
    United States, New Hampshire
    This might be helpful-

    Relationship between gut microbiota and development of T cell associated disease

    Full paper here.

    Jim
     
    Murph, Jesse2233 and Gemini like this.
  7. Forbin

    Forbin Senior Member

    Messages:
    964
    Likes:
    4,062
    I hope he looks at other microbes of the gut in addition to bacteria, like fungi.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2017
    MEMum and Murph like this.
  8. dreampop

    dreampop Senior Member

    Messages:
    244
    Likes:
    564
    From the full transcript,

    "... specific subsets that were so perturbed go to our mucosa, especially to the gut mucosa, and they’re there to check on, you know, the trillions of bacteria on the other side of the border... And if, you know, we don’t know why this is happening, whether it’s the destruction of the microbiome causing it or the immune system is destructed and that’s causing the changes to the microbiome and that’s actually something that we’re looking at."

    This is the part that is dampening my excitement because it might just be something that happens when the gut is messed up, as the study already posted in this thread shows. My worry is that the 'perturbations' can go either way, too high or too low, suggesting that is gut-driving the immune system finding. So my worry is the 'big' finding might not even be CFS specific. It would be big if it is, but even then it might not directly be pathological, and that's a lot of money on the gut.
     
  9. Murph

    Murph :)

    Messages:
    724
    Likes:
    3,482
    ljimbo423 and Thinktank like this.
  10. ljimbo423

    ljimbo423 Senior Member

    Messages:
    780
    Likes:
    1,337
    United States, New Hampshire
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27383982/
     
    Cam Newton likes this.

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page