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Depression & CFS - Manifestations of Shared IO & NS Pathways

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by shannah, Oct 3, 2010.

  1. shannah

    shannah Senior Member

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    Although this is from July, I don't see that it's been posted before. If so, I apologize.

    Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2010 Jul 4. [Epub ahead of print]

    An intriguing and hitherto unexplained co-occurrence: Depression and chronic fatigue syndrome are manifestations of shared inflammatory, oxidative and nitrosative (IO&NS) pathways.
    Maes M.

    Abstract
    There is a significant 'comorbidity' between depression and myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). Depressive symptoms frequently occur during the course of ME/CFS. Fatigue and somatic symptoms (F&S), like pain, muscle tension, and a flu-like malaise, are key components of depression. At the same time, depression and ME/CFS show major clinical differences, which allow to discriminate them with a 100% accuracy. This paper aims to review the shared pathways that underpin both disorders and the pathways that discriminate them. Numerous studies have shown that depression and ME/CFS are characterized by shared aberrations in inflammatory, oxidative and nitrosative (IO&NS) pathways, like systemic inflammation and its long-term sequels, including O&NS-induced damage to fatty acids, proteins and DNA; dysfunctional mitochondria; lowered antioxidant levels, like zinc and coenzyme Q10; autoimmune responses to neoepitopes formed by O&NS; lowered omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid levels; and increased translocation of gram-negative bacteria. Some IO&NS-related pathways, like the induction of indoleamine 2-3-dioxygenase, neurodegeneration and decreased neurogenesis, are more specific to depression, whereas other pathways, like the 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase/RNase L pathway, are specific to ME/CFS. Most current animal models of depression, e.g. those induced by cytokines, are not reminiscent of human depression but reflect a mixture of depressive and F&S symptoms. The latter symptoms, sometimes called sickness behavior, differ from depression and ME/CFS because the former is a (sub)acute response to infection-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines that aims to enhance recovery, whereas the latter are characterized by long-term sequels in multiple IO&NS pathways. Depression and ME/CFS are not 'comorbid' disorders, but should be regarded as 'co-associated disorders' that are clinical manifestations of shared pathways.

    PMID: 20609377 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
     
  2. Marco

    Marco Old blackguard

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    Near Cognac, France
    " At the same time, depression and ME/CFS show major clinical differences, which allow to discriminate them with a 100% accuracy."

    Unless you work for the CDC or King's College that is ! ;)

    "Most current animal models of depression, e.g. those induced by cytokines, are not reminiscent of human depression but reflect a mixture of depressive and F&S symptoms. The latter symptoms, sometimes called sickness behavior, differ from depression and ME/CFS because the former is a (sub)acute response to infection-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines that aims to enhance recovery, whereas the latter are characterized by long-term sequels in multiple IO&NS pathways."

    So their interpretation is that animal models show that depression and CFS like symptoms can be induced via infection-induced inflammatory cytokines but that the animal models are not a good analogue because they represent an acute rather than chronic response?

    Did they ever consider that they are finding good evidence that both depression and CFS (sic) both result from chronic infection?

    Probably not.
     

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