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Dark Chocolate and CFS Study

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by Seattle Sue, Sep 10, 2012.

  1. perchance dreamer

    perchance dreamer Senior Member

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    I love Theo 85% Dark Chocolate. It's very smooth.
  2. LindaSan

    LindaSan

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    Seattle Sue:
    I got a kick out of your post. You and I are a lot alike: I, too, try a bunch of different things all at once, or overlapping, because I don't seem to be getting any younger.
    I envy anyone who can eat all that chocolate - it does such weird things to me. It is so incredibly stimulating that if I eat even a small piece, say at 6 pm, I will have insomnia, and often heart palpitations, until about 2 am. I must be allergic to the stuff.
    I'm new to the methylation block protocol. Don't know all that much about it except that I'm taking FolaPro and Intrinsi-B-12. I'm "over-methylated" so I kinda think taking these methylated supplements probably isn't right for me. I don't know - so much to learn, so little time.
    There's research over at the Marshall Protocol Knowledge Base that might interest you on these miserable *&^% bacteria. I did the Marshall Protocol and it helped my infections a lot. I might even go back on the MP, I don't know. At the MPKB.org site, you can read about, say, Lyme Disease (Borrelia Burdorger) which is also one of those microorganisms that knocks out the immune system which then allows all kinds of icky bugs to enter. I seem to have Lyme, or perhaps a cousin with a similar M.O. I quit the MP because I wanted to find a more natural way to get my immune system working again. That may have been a mistake, I don't know.
    Other sites about the MP include Bacteriality.com and CureMyTh1.org if you're interested.
    Bye for now,
    Linda in Bellingham, WA
  3. Valentijn

    Valentijn Activity Level: 3

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    It might just be one of the ingredients, and not the cocoa itself. Most chocolate on the market contains soy lecitithin, which could cause problems if you have soy issues. And soy is one of the more common allergens.
  4. mermaid

    mermaid Senior Member

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    I decided to include raw cacao in my diet a while back. I am lucky enough to have a powerful Vitamix so I throw in the raw cacao nibs, coconut oil and coconut milk, with cashew nuts and seeds and make a lovely kind of choc milk with it all - the coconut oil makes it sweet enough for me without needing to add any kind of sugar. I have this every morning as unfortunately if I eat chocolate bars I tend to eat the lot in one go!

    Even yummier is a mix I can make like a kind of chocolate spread with just the coconut oil, the raw cacao nibs and the cashew nuts. I only make this occasionally as it's rather addictive.

    I just think of the magnesium in it and feel it must be doing me good (quite apart from the coconut oil of course!).
    Little Bluestem and Valentijn like this.
  5. Firestormm

    Firestormm Guest

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    Am attending this ME Management (self-management really) course at present run by my local NHS ME Service. Anyway, long story short, chocolate raised it's pretty head again today.

    Due to it's caffeine content (and stimulatory effect) it was not recommended as something to munch on at night upon waking, or during the day if trying to rest. Fair enough.

    I mentioned this study, and that it had only been on 10 patients etc. etc. and the British Dietetic Association were also mentioned.

    Just thought I would link to their leaflet from January 2012 (there may have been an article from them specifically about this study but I can't find it now) on diet and CFS/ME if you weren't aware of it.

    This was all they had to say about this particular finding, which again seems fair enough to me:

    Personally I cannot stand dark chocolate and feel it should only be used in cooking - I am a milk-man myself :p

    I did I admit reach for something - still do - to munch when coming out of 'whatever' it is that scared the crap out of me during sleep.

    I find that eating - well anything really - enables me to regain focus and settle. Anyway, that was why it was talked briefly about. Interestingly, I was/am seeking something to stimulate my awareness back into reality - it's disturbing when coming out of an episode and/or terror - plus of course food is comforting.
  6. peggy-sue

    peggy-sue

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    I wonder, (in general) if anybody has ever done "gender and choccie preference" studies.
    I feel that (most) women understand choccie far better than (most) men do.
    (Most) men can cope with the strange phenonenon of eating just one or two pieces.
    (Most) women on the other hand, fully understand the entirely normal need to consume the entire bar once it has been opened.
    (Most) women understand dark chocolate, the darker the better.:balanced:
    But I seem to know a whole load of men who eat the white stuff :aghhh: by choice. :aghhh::aghhh:

    ;)
  7. Firestormm

    Firestormm Guest

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    peggy-sue URGH!!! to the 'white-stuff' :ill: Milk chocolate is the way to go for me at least. But 'milky-bars' and the like - BLURGH! Vomit :)
  8. peggy-sue

    peggy-sue

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    Aaah - a huMAN. ;)
    Firestormm likes this.
  9. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6

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    Chocolate contains both caffeine and theobromine. I like the dark stuff, and started adding cocoa to meals (e.g. curry and pasta sauces) and carried on partly because I like it. I also eat Plamil dairy free/sugar-free dark chocolate, but like some others I can't tolerate a lot of it - it seems to make me a bit shaky and nauseous if I have more than a few squares. I don't think it's the soya in my case, as I seem OK with other soya products.

    Re oxalates, this paper:

    http://ndt.oxfordjournals.org/content/15/1/117.full

    says "(in relation to kidney stones): “Only spinach and rhubarb are considered to be high risk food items, for their high amounts of bioavailable oxalate. Peanuts, instant tea, almonds, chocolate and pecans are considered as moderate risk food items.”

    I'm not sure whether it's the study linked to in the first message of this thread, but a while back someone posted a link in a forum to an animated video which illustrated a lot of serious shortcomings with a study on chocolate's supposed benefits. It pretty well discredited the supposed evidence completely. Such studies have also supposedly found benefits for diabetics and possibly heart patients?
  10. peggy-sue

    peggy-sue

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    Mmmm.. I like unsweetened dark chocolate and a bit of chilli in a red wine jus. But my OH doesn't.:cry:

    I've never seen the caffeine content of choccie listed anywhere - I did go looking once, and found something that said the theobromine was the thing that kept you awake. (You can't believe everything you read on the web. ;) )

    A big bar of 81% consumed late at night (and not lost, melted under my bum) will keep me awake.

    Do you know how much is in it, MeSci?

    (I never touch coffee after 4.30 in the afternoon)
  11. Firestormm

    Firestormm Guest

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    peggy-sue see the highlighted 'caffeine' link in my post above. Gives a good review of chocolate and it's constituent parts :)
  12. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6

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    I don't like it unsweetened. The one I have is sweetened with xylitol.

    I generally don't have coffee or chocolate in the evenings, but I don't drink much coffee anyway. Before ME I used to sleep fine after a late coffee.
  13. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    I was going to post the following comment if and when the other one went up, but it never did: Looking over it quickly now, I'm not sure if I misread something regarding drop outs
    e.g. perhaps this means 10 all the way through.


  14. WillowJ

    WillowJ Senior Member

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  15. Little Bluestem

    Little Bluestem Senescent on the Illinois prairie, USA

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    I wish they had said which brands of dark chocolate had the most polyphenols. The problem with dark chocolate is the calories. I will cut back to one square instead of two. The package says that the serving size is four squares, so I thought I was being conservative at two.

    Maybe next winter I will get to trying to make chocolate from powdered cocoa, coconut oil, and stevia. During the summer (if it ever gets here), that would make chocolate syrup because of the low melting point of coconut oil. I would find it necessary to put the chocolate syrup on ice cream. :whistle:
  16. A.B.

    A.B. Senior Member

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    I like powdered cocoa, a banana, fresh orange juice, some coconut milk, all mixed. Some water is needed also. It's delicious. Unfortunately it induces reactive hypoglycemia if consumed on a regular basis, so I can't have it often.
    Little Bluestem and Valentijn like this.
  17. golden

    golden Senior Member

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    Ombar is the best chocolate i have ever had - plus it contains beneficial bacteria lol

    http://ombar.co.uk/
  18. Little Bluestem

    Little Bluestem Senescent on the Illinois prairie, USA

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    Some coconut oil might make it less apt to induce reactive hypoglycemia (also more fattening).
  19. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6

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    I use a lot of coconut oil and it doesn't make me gain weight. Gluten and carbs/grain/sugar do.
    Little Bluestem, Valentijn and Mij like this.
  20. bambi

    bambi

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    When are you guys ever gonna learn to read the fine print and check for a conflict of interest ?

    Competing interests
    None for TS, ASR, DDM and SLA

    SB worked as Head of Research for Nestlé, PLC, York :wide-eyed:

    Authors' contributions
    TS, SB, ASR, DDM and SLA contributed to the design, conduct, analysis, drafting and revision of the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

    Acknowledgements
    Nestlé PLC York, UK provided the chocolate for the study and performed the analysis as an unrestricted contribution.:wide-eyed::wide-eyed:

    ;)
    WillowJ and Valentijn like this.

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