Invest in ME Conference 12: First Class in Every Way
OverTheHills wraps up our series of articles on this year's 12th Invest in ME International Conference (IIMEC12) in London with some reflections on her experience as a patient attending the conference for the first time.
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Daily Express: End of the Doctor's Surgery

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Firestormm, Nov 25, 2012.

  1. Firestormm

    Firestormm

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    Cornwall England
    A sensational headline I have no doubt, but still, this is happening...
    So. What do you think about this replacing of face-to-face with technology? Tele-health has been something posited and trialled in my area among those with long term conditions. For MS I think it was.

    I think that results were mixed. It's a huge sea-change for people to get used to not meeting their doctor. Mind you have you ever tried getting a GP to do a home visit these days?!!
     
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  2. Sasha

    Sasha Fine, thank you

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    I'd be thrilled if this was an option (so that those for which it wasn't suitable could still have as much face-to-face as they wanted).

    For those of us who are bedbound or housebound, tackling GP appointments, where the expectation is that you turn up no matter what, would be great. Over the years, I've managed to get my GP to deal with me by phone. It took him five years to tell me that it's possible to email him. Huge benefit to me to be able to avoid the trip and avoid sitting in the waiting room with viral patients coughing their lovely new bugs all over me.

    Big thumbs-up for me, as long as proper provision remains for face-to-face.
     
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  3. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Logan, Queensland, Australia
    This technology has been used in Australia for remote communities I think. However this is for places that are hundreds of miles from a doctor's surgery, and up to a thousand miles from a specialist. We have not done this for cities. I think the claim this will make surgeries obsolete is wrong. I think however it will mean that there will be a better service to the very sick who do not get a doctor visit very often. I do think it will also reduce the distribution and size of doctor's surgeries. The consequence of that is likely to be that if you need to see a doctor face to face then you will have to travel further.

    Budget cutting is typical slash and burn economic rationalism. Efficiency is good, but its only local. What happens in the entire economic system? Evidence is growing, and many economists are arguing, that the current economic policies not only wont fix our economic problems globally, they are the cause of our economic problems. Look up Steve Keen for example, who has written a book Debunking Economics and has, along with many other economists, been predicting current crises for many many years.

    Bye, Alex
     
  4. Firestormm

    Firestormm

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    One of the considerations here in Cornwall (and elsewhere too I suspect) is that relating to rurality. We have one main hospital in Truro and yet by any measurement our geography is pretty big.*

    As you said Sasha for people who are unable to make an appointment that doesn't require a doctor to be physically present - then Telehealth (telephone and video and email) would be a good alternative.

    If there was a distinct provision for people that better enabled a relationship to be formed with their GP and/or specialist over and above that which is not possible today by small slots in a doctor's schedule - then I'd support it.

    My concern I guess is that people will be less inclined to use this technology development. That more might (if they are able) resort to the more spurious internet as a resource to self-diagnose and treat.

    That the important role of a GP would be diluted (not that it hasn't been already in my view). I'd be interested to hear what the doctor's themselves have to say about it all. I mean we already have NHS Direct (or whatever it is called these days), and as you say, you can email a GP as well as obtain repeat prescriptions via the internet and have the order delivered (in my case) to our village post office.

    But I do worry that this statement will mean wholesale change. Rather like the Welfare Reforms, this will mean change for all and those who cannot cope or unable to cope will not be provided for...

    (* we also have to serve the community on the Isles of Scilly who use I believe Telehealth at least in part).
     
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