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D-ribose - can it make you feel bad?

Discussion in 'General Treatment' started by Sasha, May 13, 2013.

  1. Healthy Someday

    Healthy Someday

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    I can't take it. It makes me feel that fake hypoglycemic way (having hypo symptoms without actual low blood glucose). I have the fake hypoglycemia symptoms anyway so no D-Ribose for me.
     
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  2. rosie26

    rosie26 Senior Member

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    I have a tendency for low blood sugar, and try to eat small amounts throughout the day because of this.

    So I was very nervous when I started taking D Ribose. Knowing that it could affect my blood sugar levels.

    I made sure I had it with food such as breakfast and dinner in the evening. I haven't had any problems. Which has been amazing, it's just been nothing but one big help to me. Considering that I am so intolerant to tablets, it's wonderful to be able to take something with no nasty side effects for me. I take the powdered form.
     
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  3. Ashwin

    Ashwin

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    Limerick, Ireland
    Ribose is converted to ATP for energy, which is why you take it. However, it can also be converted to the Amino acids Tryptophan and Histidine. Tryptophan may be converted to Serotonin (5-Hydroxytryptamine). Serotonin is the Hormone/neurotransmitter that induces sleep. Perhaps the path that Ribose takes in the body depends on levels of Glucose in the tissues and activity of Enzyme systems involved and this might explain the differing effects in individuals. Would it help to take your dose at bedtime?
     
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  4. snowathlete

    snowathlete

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    I'm giving this another go.
    It seems I have a mutation in the AMPD1 gene which is involved in enegy production and could potentially mean that I am losing a lot of AMP and my body has to make more. So D-ribose could help with that.
    I took some this evening with my evening meal and feel a little different but I'm not sure how to describe it - sort of stimulated perhaps? But I still feel tired and fatigued like normal. I want to give it a few days if possible, though I do have a mild headache from it. The headache is hard to explain too, I sorta feel like i have a headache but thinking about it, my head does not hurt. Not sure how else to explain that. I'll try and keep up a few days and see.
     
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  5. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6

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    Does 'tired but wired' describe it? That is what it did to me except much much worse than usual. I also felt as though I had a furnace burning inside, whilst my skin felt cold and shivery. Mentally I felt very jittery. Sleep was impossible. Horrible. A common reaction, I think. Not entirely unlike what I had with Prozac, which I also had to stop quickly, although that was more mental and less physical.

    No way could I persevere with either of those, and I have no confidence that it would have been wise to do so, at least not without very close supervision and support.
     
  6. snowathlete

    snowathlete

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    Mildly, perhaps. Not sure. It certainly is increasing my serotonin because I was lying in bed last night grinning at nothing. Not sure why - it was a bit odd.
     
  7. Leopardtail

    Leopardtail Senior Member

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    I also got the tired but wired when first starting Ribose, it causes a couple of definite and a whole number of possible changes to occur when 'energy comes to town'. For me those past over quite quickly and were gone in a few days. I have had one or two messages form people it did not agree with though. What you describe sounds very much like a mild hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar) - that can be avoided by (for example) taking it with breakfast cereal, bread or some other form of carbohydrate.
    If you feel more 'drunk and doped' then it's a tougher call, I know some people feel it causes 'bugs in the gut' to produce alcohol.
     

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