The power and pitfalls of omics part 2: epigenomics, transcriptomics and ME/CFS
Simon McGrath concludes his blog about the remarkable Prof George Davey Smith's smart ideas for understanding diseases, which may soon be applied to ME/CFS.
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D lactic acidosis and me/cfs have similarities

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by Zara, Jan 12, 2018.

  1. Zara

    Zara

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    Netherlands
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2018
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  2. Runner5

    Runner5 Senior Member

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    PNW
    I know you want to delete this, but I hadn't seen it before so thank you for posting.

    Just wondering though, it looks like from this report a low-carbohydrate diet would help symptoms. I'm sure people here have tried that, just curious, if you've gone low carb --- did it help, hurt? What happened?
     
  3. jpcv

    jpcv Senior Member

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    SE coast, Brazil
    Low carb diet helped me, mostly my gut problems , but it didn´t help me a lot regarding other ME/CFS symptoms
     
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  4. Zara

    Zara

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    Hi

    I tried for one year to do gluten free and sugar free diet...not yet knowing anything about this lactic accumulation in the body and blood.
    I felt a bit more energy, less GI problems, less pain. After one year i crashed anyways. Looking back it had to do with my work. This took too much energy, after 11 years being ill and fulltime working it destroyed my health.
    Now I started with sugar free diet and less carbohydrates. But is difficult because I depend on others to cook for me. I am housebound.
     
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  5. Runner5

    Runner5 Senior Member

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    @Zara (((Big HUGS)))
     
  6. Zara

    Zara

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    Thanks Runner5
     
  7. Avenger

    Avenger

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    Hi, I was diagnosed with CFS/ME and Fibromyalgia for many years.

    I have now been properly diagnosed with D-Lactic Acidosis (without short bowel syndrome).

    You are totally correct about mitochondrial function, dysbiosis, gut dysfunction and neurological abnormalities.

    I respond temporarily to antibiotics only for symptoms to return.

    Anyone with CFS ME can trial 0% Carbohydrate and Sugar diet. even small ammounts of Carbs and Sugars will convert to D-Lactic acid in those affected. 64 hours would show improvement, but a few weeks will show if your symptoms are due to D-Lactic Acidosis. Please read the abstract below.

    Increased D-Lactic Acid Intestinal Bacteria in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
    1. JOHN R. SHEEDY1,
    2. RICHARD E.H. WETTENHALL1,
    3. DENIS SCANLON2,
    4. PAUL R. GOOLEY1,
    5. DONALD P. LEWIS3,
    6. NEIL MCGREGOR4,
    7. DAVID I. STAPLETON1,
    8. HENRY L. BUTT5 and
    9. KENNY L. DE MEIRLEIR6
    +Author Affiliations

    1. Kenny.De.Meirleir@vub.ac.be

    Next Section
    Abstract
    Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) are affected by symptoms of cognitive dysfunction and neurological impairment, the cause of which has yet to be elucidated. However, these symptoms are strikingly similar to those of patients presented with D-lactic acidosis. A significant increase of Gram positive facultative anaerobic faecal microorganisms in 108 CFS patients as compared to 177 control subjects (p<0.01) is presented in this report. The viable count of D-lactic acid producing Enterococcus and Streptococcus spp. in the faecal samples from the CFS group (3.5×107 cfu/L and 9.8×107 cfu/L respectively) were significantly higher than those for the control group (5.0×106 cfu/L and 8.9×104cfu/L respectively). Analysis of exometabolic profiles of Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus sanguinis, representatives of Enterococcus and Streptococcus spp. respectively, by NMR and HPLC showed that these organisms produced significantly more lactic acid (p<0.01) from 13C-labeled glucose, than the Gram negative Escherichia coli. Further, both E. faecalis and S. sanguinis secrete more D-lactic acid than E. coli. This study suggests a probable link between intestinal colonization of Gram positive facultative anaerobic D-lactic acid bacteria and symptom expressions in a subgroup of patients with CFS. Given the fact that this might explain not only neurocognitive dysfunction in CFS patients but also mitochondrial dysfunction, these findings may have important clinical implications.

     
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