The Power and Pitfalls of Omics: George Davey Smith’s storming talk at ME/CFS conference
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Cytokine Expression Profiles in Post Mono CFS

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by shannah, Sep 15, 2012.

  1. shannah

    shannah Senior Member

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    Cytokine expression profiles of immune imbalance in post-mononucleosis chronic fatigue

    Gordon Broderick, Ben Z Katz, Henrique Fernandes, Mary Ann Fletcher, Nancy G Klimas, Frederick A Smith, Maurice RG O'Gorman, Suzanne D Vernon and Renee Taylor

    Journal of Translational Medicine 2012, 10:191 doi:10.1186/1479-5876-10-191
    Published: 13 September 2012
    Abstract (provisional)

    Background

    As Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) has been known to follow Epstein-Bar virus (EBV) and other systemic infections; our objective was to describe differences in immune activation in post-infective CFS (PI-CFS) patients and recovered controls. We studied 301 adolescents prospectively over 24 months following the diagnosis of monospot-positive infectious mononucleosis (IM). We found an incidence of CFS at 6, 12 and 24 months of 13%, 7% and 4% respectively.
    Methods

    Using chemiluminescent imaging we measured the concentrations of IL-1a, 1b, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12 (p70), 13, 15, 17 and 23, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha and TNF-beta in duplicate plasma samples available in bio-bank from 9 PI-CFS subjects and 12 recovered controls at 24 months post-infection.
    Results

    Standard comparative analysis indicated significant differences in IL-8 and 23 across subject groups. In constructing a linear classification model IL-6, 8 and 23 were selected by two different statistical approaches as discriminating features, with IL-1a, IL-2 and IFN-gamma also selected in one model or the other. This supported an assignment accuracy of better than 80% at a confidence level of 0.95 into PI-CFS versus recovered controls.
    Conclusion

    These results suggest that co-expression patterns in as few as 5 cytokines associated with Th17 function may hold promise as a tool for the diagnosis of post-infectious CFS.

    http://www.translational-medicine.com/content/10/1/191/abstract
     
    alex3619, Enid, mellster and 8 others like this.
  2. August59

    August59 Daughters High School Graduation

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    Upstate SC, USA
    Good find! Thanks Shannah
     
  3. WillowJ

    WillowJ คภภเє ɠรค๓թєl

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    so what's Th17?
    http://www.ebioscience.com/knowledge-center/cell-type/th17-cells.htm

     
  4. mellster

    mellster Marco

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    Spot on - good find!
     
  5. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Hibernating

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    This is interesting, however the last Broderick study found suppresed Th1/Th17 in favour of Th2. But the difference could be due to the state/progression of the illness.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20447453

    But there is also this study:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18774769
    Also interesting to note that the effect of Rituximab has been correlated a reduction of the Th17 response:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21400475
     
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  6. Enid

    Enid Senior Member

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    Great research findings - thanks everybody.

    And here by Cort if not already in.
     
  7. roxie60

    roxie60 Senior Member

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    So is this study saying if you have the C alelle that you are less likely to get CFS? I have TT so that is why I'm trying to understand. I looked at SNPedia and it looks like TT is the most common in the population vs CC and CT so that is why I'm confused, would seem to suggest majority of population with TT could have CFS, that cant be correct interpretation...
     
  8. roxie60

    roxie60 Senior Member

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  9. Valentijn

    Valentijn Activity Level: 3

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    Here's the relevant bit:
    So rather than seeing TT as a risk factor for CFS, they're just saying CC is protective from developing CFS.
     
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