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Could this drug help those of us with severe brain issues?

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by taniaaust1, Aug 30, 2015.

  1. taniaaust1

    taniaaust1 Senior Member

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    This is truly amazing and I recommend a watch of how this drug is helping 60% of brain damaged (accident and stroke victims) or comatose people



    (it reminds me when I was going into comatose states for up to 3 days at a time without waking at all back when I was very severe and fully bedridden with the ME. I wonder if this drug would of helped? I was really really out of it and couldn't stay awake for anything. I often was unable to even open my eyes and keep them open).

    So could this drug help extremely severe ME patients? (ones who's brains have completely shut down due to overload etc)
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2015
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  2. JPV

    JPV ɹǝqɯǝɯ ɹoıuǝs

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    So hard to tell when there is really no consensus regarding our brain issues.
     
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  3. K22

    K22

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    Some of us with severe m.e are already taking this drug for this purpose. I'm very severe and rely on it to give me function although I take zopiclone over zolpidrm. I have told some UK drs but there isn't much interest, perhaps as its a minority issue rather than a general m.e fatigue therapy. It certainly does enliven the brain before it kicks in as a sedative and that could give a clue as to what has happened in the shut down (not just normal but fatigued) very severe m.e brain. Theres been total disinterest in the very severe forms outside attempt to rehabilitate, I'd love someone to explore both the effects of this drug and more generally the severe m.e brain but then how do you do scans etc.
     
  4. K22

    K22

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    However it is artificial arousal which carries the risk of a false boom
     
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  5. Sushi

    Sushi Senior Member Albuquerque

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    Interesting that one of the documented side-effects of Ambien (zolpidem) in so called normal people is carrying on actions while asleep--getting up to cook a meal, even drive. Not exactly great things to do, but this seems to be a tricky drug with lots of unknowns, and waking people up from a coma might be related.
     
  6. taniaaust1

    taniaaust1 Senior Member

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    There was on ME person I knew at a website years ago who took Ambien and woke up to find herself standing on a busy highway (she'd slept walked on it). So probably not a good drug for those not very severe.
     
  7. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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  8. K22

    K22

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    It doesn't seem to have a rousing effect (aside from that mentioned above) in normally alert people who take the drug for sleep (they're very common sleeping pills). I have read it interferes with GABA shutting down the brain which is why it briefly "wakes" the very low function brain.
     
  9. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    Are you saying that Ambien (zolpidem) has a transient anti-GABAergic effect which is rousing, before instigating its pro-GABAergic effect which is calming and sedative, and it is the anti-GABAergic action which wakes the brain from coma?




    Ambien (zolpidem) incidentally is used for sleep as part of Dr Jacob Teitelbaum's SHINE protocol for ME/CFS.

    I understand that nonbenzodiazepines like Ambien, although these work by pretty much the same mechanism as benzodiazepines (both benzodiazepines and nonbenzodiazepines sensitize the GABA receptor), they have less problems with tolerance, addiction and withdrawal, compared to benzodiazepines.
     
  10. K22

    K22

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    Yes, I think so. This is from the article I read which explains a possible mechanism of action. The article is about the young man Louis featured in the video( I have only watched half of the video so far because of m.e brain fatigue so they may expand more on the theories there).
    http://www.theguardian.com/science/2006/sep/12/health.healthandwellbeing

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 31, 2015

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