The 12th Invest in ME Research Conference June, 2017, Part 2
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CoQ10 Ubiquinol - made from "yeast" - is it OK ?

Discussion in 'Detox: Methylation; B12; Glutathione; Chelation' started by Bansaw, Aug 25, 2014.

  1. Bansaw

    Bansaw Senior Member

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    I am pondering which CoQ10 supplement to use.
    So far I have narrowed it down to two.

    The Jarrow formulas QH-Absorb Ubiquinol here.
    And the Swanson Ultra here.

    However, I am looking at the Swanson and it appeals to me that its non-GMO apparently, but it says:

    The Jarrow one has soy in it which I tend to avoid. Everytime I see "yeast" its a red flag to me becuase of Candida but I'm not sure the Swanson one has yeast in it, but just the bi-product so it might be OK.

    Any comments?
     
  2. Critterina

    Critterina Senior Member

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    One of the principal methods of manufacturing products is to splice the gene that makes the desired substance into a yeast or bacteria and to grow them in vats, recover, and purify the substance. This is the science of biotechnology. If the manufacturer uses cGMP (current Good Manufacturing Practices), which they have to do if they use the facility to make substances controlled by the FDA, you can be sure that the yeast themselves don't make it into the product. Many good manufacturers of supplements choose to use cGMP, even though they are not required to do so. Maybe someone else here will know if Jarrow does, but I wouldn't be surprised if they do.

    That said, if you were ALLERGIC to yeast, you'd probably want to avoid it, because who knows what protein in the yeast would be causing it, and since it's possible to have an anaphylactic response to only 6 molecules of something, you'd really want to avoid it. But that's different, very different, than having a whole live yeast in the supplement.
     
  3. Bansaw

    Bansaw Senior Member

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    Would I be right in saying that nearly all of the CoQ10 ubiquinol products out there are made in the same way, ie: yeast/bacteria fermentation?
     
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  4. Critterina

    Critterina Senior Member

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    I don't know. I have several clients in the biotechnology field, but they make vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, and cancer treatments mostly. I know it's a common way to manufacture things because it's cost-effective, contollable high quality, and generally less controversial than harvesting from animals (nobody has yet come to protest the right to life for microbes).
     
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  5. Keela Too

    Keela Too Sally Burch

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    I've just switched to using this type of Co-Q-10 ... I never thought to check how it was made!

    But having said that I'm not worried about yeast particularly. I drink kefir and I understand that it is made by a yeast/bacteria symbiosis.
     
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  6. Critterina

    Critterina Senior Member

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    Yes, and you're actually drinking the yeast and bacteria. It's supposed to be very good for you (as long as you're not histamine intolerant like me!)
     
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  7. Bansaw

    Bansaw Senior Member

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    I drink raw milk Kefir also. The yeasts in kefir are beneficial, and Candida is too (until it changes into its pathogenic state that is). I actually take S.Boulardii which is said to be antagonistic to Candida.
    But a blood test found I was intolerant to yeast (bakers and brewers) so I've got to be careful.
    But if the CoQ10 ubiquinol is a bi-product of the yeast process and no or little yeast is found in the final product then it won't affect me much. (I have the odd slice of bread once every few weeks with no reaction).
     
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  8. Jonathan Edwards

    Jonathan Edwards "Gibberish"

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    Ubiquinol is a small molecule (about 700D) that I suspect is found in almost all cells of all organisms, like phospholipids or cholesterol. It is not a protein so genetic engineering would not be relevant I think. It looks as if the length of the lipid tail can vary. It is lipid soluble so I suspect it is extracted using a solvent that would leave specific yeast proteins behind. I agree that contamination might be enough if there was an allergy issue. Otherwise I cannot see any reason to worry. It is likely that most small biological molecules involved in active metabolism like this are produced in yeast because yeast is so easy to grow in suspension.
     
  9. Critterina

    Critterina Senior Member

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    Yes, that's how it got it's name, from the word "ubiquitous".

    Not sure what you mean here, as inserting a gene into a yeast to grow it is something I consider genetic engineering. Maybe you have a narrower definition?

    That may be true. I know for other/larger molecules E. coli is used, as are dog kidney (MDCK), green monkey kidney (Vero), and other standard types of cell lines. It really depends on what you're growing, and whether you are splicing a gene into a cell nucleus or infecting the cells with a virus (like influenza or anthrax) to harvest the virus.
     
  10. Jonathan Edwards

    Jonathan Edwards "Gibberish"

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    There is no gene for ubiquinol - it will be synthesised by a series of enzymes which the yeast will already have if, as we think, all cells make ubiquinol. I would guess that any old yeast in the kitchen will do the job! There is no need to give the yeast any extra genes for more enzymes if it already has its own. I don't think this has anything to do with making proteins in E coli or CHO cells etc. I guess you might make GM yeast that goes into ubiquinol synthesis overdrive but I doubt that is necessary.
     
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  11. ahmo

    ahmo Senior Member

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  12. Critterina

    Critterina Senior Member

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    OK, Thank you. I now see what you mean. Hmmm, it would seem like overdrive would be worth trying for, if you're going into business making it. But I have no idea what they actually have done.
     

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