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Confused about chelation (the process) and chelated supplements -- what is the difference?

Discussion in 'General Treatment' started by Aileen, Sep 4, 2014.

  1. Aileen

    Aileen Senior Member

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    I read people are doing "chelation" and using things like ALA, EDTA or DMSA (whatever they are). I think this means they are using these substances to bind to unwanted items like mercury to escort them out of the body.

    But ... I read on the supplement labels that this "chelated" form of Vit or Mineral X is better than the other kinds because it is more bioavailable and easier for the body to use.

    So does any supplement that says chelated or mineral chelate actually bind to something like mercury? How would a chelated vitamin be easier to absorb or more useful to me if it is doing this?

    I'm really confused. Should I be buying chelated supplements or avoiding them? How do I know which "bad guys" bind to which supplements?
     
  2. halcyon

    halcyon Senior Member

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    I don't believe there is any danger in taking chelated minerals. They are just the elemental mineral bound to an amino acid in order to prevent the mineral from binding with other compounds in your digestive system before being absorbed. When you are doing chelation therapy you are taking a direct chelating agent that can readily bind to a metal.
     
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  3. Aileen

    Aileen Senior Member

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    @halcyon So, if I understand you correctly, if I buy, for example, "chelated molybdenum" then I would likely be getting more molybdenum used by my body than if I buy "molybdenum".

    Since I have MCS and have a hard time tolerating everything, if I don't tolerate the mineral very well then I would maybe be better off starting with the regular version. On the other hand, my digestive system is not happy. There are very few foods I can eat. :confused: Thoughts, anyone?

    Re: chelating agents. I am assuming then you first have to figure out which toxin you are trying to get rid of, then find a protocol which tells you what chelating agent to use.

    Have I got that straight? :nerd:
     
  4. halcyon

    halcyon Senior Member

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    That's the theory, yes. I'm not sure it's been proven that every chelated preparation is always more bioavailable but assuming you're not sensitive to the amino acid used it shouldn't cause any problems.

    Most likely yes, the different agents all have an affinity for a certain metal or metals.
     
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  5. Valentijn

    Valentijn WE ARE KINA

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    I'd stay away from chelated magnesium. It's as bad as magnesium oxide when it comes to causing diarrhea :eek:
     

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