Invest in ME Conference 12: First Class in Every Way
OverTheHills wraps up our series of articles on this year's 12th Invest in ME International Conference (IIMEC12) in London with some reflections on her experience as a patient attending the conference for the first time.
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Compensation & Treatment: Disability Benefits & Outcomes of US Veterans Receiving PTSD Treatment

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Dolphin, Oct 12, 2012.

  1. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    (Unlikely to be important)

    I happened to come across this as CFS is mentioned somewhere in it.

    However, I'm posting it just because I thought it was interesting that receiving compentsation didn't lead to poorer outcomes: it is sometimes thrown at people with ME/CFS, or indeed people with lots of other conditions, that giving them money promotes secondary gain and leads to worse outcomes but this study didn't find that anyway (I don't know if this issue is looked at that much - perhaps it is).

    It might also be useful for Gulf war veterans (I'm not sure, but perhaps they and those who served in Afghanistan are move likely to get compensation than veterans from other eras?).

     
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  2. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

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    Thanks Dolphin.

    I get the impression that it's not looked at much, but still widely assumed!

    I think that there was one study which found an association with worse outcomes, and that has been used to excuse this claim from then on.

    I seem to remember that there was a recent CFS study that found being on benefits had no impact... was it even PACE? Was it a PACE abstract that we've not had the full paper released yet? Maybe it was another group... darn, my memory sucks! I think that there was also another, older study which found no association, but just got ignored.

    I need a better way of filing away/storing these things. I guess I don't need it as a reference right now.

    Personally, I think that this would be a difficult area to study. eg: If those applying for benefits/compensation tended to be poorer, then this could leave them with less control over their lives, and lead to worse outcomes. The stress and work of applying for benefits/compensation could cause problems. Some people might just be keener to present themselves as iller as part of the process - when the benefits system has quite arbitrary cut-offs, it can be strange when one knows one is on the edge of a boundary, and that walking an average of 201 meters a day will lead to poverty, while 199 is fine. These sorts of situations are likely to have some corrupting impact upon the way in which people describe their limitations imo, but that doesn't tell us anything about the nature of one's condition, or the impact of psychosocial factors upon it's perpetuation.

    Having said all that, I know that this is a controversial area, and that there is some evidence that these sorts of issues don't have any impact on people's rehabilitation from injuries and disability. Maybe I'm too influenced by undergraduate views of homo economicus.
     
  3. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    Thanks for your thoughts, E12.

    There was a PACE mediators poster abstract http://www.trialsjournal.com/content/12/S1/A144 which was hard to read and understand but it is expected there will be a proper paper eventually.

    I think you are thinking of the FINE Trial - see this post from Simon : http://forums.phoenixrising.me/inde...-syndrome-fine-trial-paper.18641/#post-288072

    (I haven't read that paper but hope to soon now as I'm starting to finally get a bit more on top of some work).
     
  4. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

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    You already have a better knowledge of my own memories than I do. It will be a bit intimidating when you're more on top of things!
     
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  5. jimells

    jimells Senior Member

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    I don't need a study to know that continued extreme poverty contributes to making my illness worse.

    For example, there was a bad windstorm a few days ago, and a piece of roll roofing on my shed started peeling back. Repairing it took maybe 1/2 hour and two trips up the ladder. I knew full well that the repair, while requiring only a minor effort from a 'normal' person, would trigger PEM, a migraine and another day of barely out of bed. I also knew that not repairing the damage immediately would soon lead to a shed with no roofing.

    If I could've hired out the repair, today would've been a much better day...
     
  6. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    Very sorry to hear the situation you find yourself in. However, not sure the study relates to what you are referring to.
     
  7. jimells

    jimells Senior Member

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    If my disability claim is ever accepted, I can hire out repairs instead of making myself sicker by doing them myself. I can't say that disability payments would improve the illness, but it could very likely slow down the deterioration.

    It's hard to take serious any research that suggests Disability payments would make the illness worse.
     
  8. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    Yes, I accept that. It's just ideally to look at that effect one would look at income level rather than receipt/non-receipt of disability payments. But again, I'm sorry for the situation you find yourself in; it also makes me appreciate the situation I find myself in (living with my parents where I don't have to worry about some things).
     

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