The power and pitfalls of omics part 2: epigenomics, transcriptomics and ME/CFS
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Comorbidities treated in primary care in children with CFS/ME (Norway)

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by Effi, Sep 3, 2016.

  1. Effi

    Effi Senior Member

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    http://bmcfampract.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12875-016-0527-7

    Comorbidities treated in primary care in children with chronic fatigue syndrome / myalgic encephalomyelitis: A nationwide registry linkage study from Norway

    Inger J. BakkenEmail authorView ORCID ID profile, Kari Tveito, Kari M. Aaberg, Sara Ghaderi, Nina Gunnes, Lill Trogstad, Per Magnus, Camilla Stoltenberg and Siri E. Håberg

    BMC Family Practice BMC series – open, inclusive and trusted
    201617:128 DOI: 10.1186/s12875-016-0527-7 © The Author(s). 2016
    Received: 9 April 2016 Accepted: 26 August 2016 Published: 2 September 2016

     
  2. Simon

    Simon

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    I'd always assumed glandular fever/infectious mono was a much more common cause of mecfs in children.
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2016
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  3. Luther Blissett

    Luther Blissett Senior Member

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    What an interesting and well written paper.

    It's just a small thing, but the flow chart in fig. 1 , and the way the tables are formatted made this so much easier for someone like me to understand.

    It's interesting that the Diagnoses relating to infections shows such a difference between groups even up to 2 years before the ME diagnosis.
     
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  4. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    That was for within 2 years after diagnosis. The figure for ever was higher:
    Also not everyone would necessarily have been tested for glandular fever/infectious mononucleosis.
     
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  5. Simon

    Simon

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    So that's still 80% of cases not being from glandular fever, which surprises me - but Ive never found good data before this study.

    It's been around for years. I can't imagine doctors wouldn't test for mono - it's easy to do, probably cheap - if you have a chlid that ill, I'd have thought it would be one of the first they reach for.
     
  6. Denise

    Denise Senior Member

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    I am not saying this is the best possible data but here are some links on glandular fever/"mono"

    Predictors of post-infectious chronic fatigue syndrome in adolescents

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3956649/


    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Following Infectious Mononucleosis in Adolescents: A Prospective Cohort Study

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2756827/

    And the IOM report discusses "mono" and ME in

    http://www.nap.edu/read/19012/chapter/8

    (this study ends in 2016)
    A PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF CFS FOLLOWING INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS IN COLLEGE STUDENTS
    https://projectreporter.nih.gov/pro...aram=&ddvalue=&ddsub=&cr=1&csb=default&cs=ASC
     
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  7. *GG*

    *GG* Senior Member

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    25% is the figure I have heard, so not much difference between 20 to 25. Not sure if the number is from anectodal evidence or a previous study.

    GG
     
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  8. Simon

    Simon

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    Really interesiting - I'd love to know where are the other cases come from.

    There's more evidence that mono isn't responsible for most childhood cases. Here's an age profile of CFS in kids, using the same Norwegian population database
    Two age peaks in the incidence of chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis: a population-based registry study from Norway 2008-2012 |
    [​IMG]

    Note the peak is mid-teens. Now here's one for mono. Note that, by contrast, the peak age for mono is early twenties.

    mono profile.gif
    If mono was responsiblle for most childhood cases, I would have expected the two profiles to be closer together (or perhaps as children become adults glandular fever is less likely to develop into CFS).
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2016
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  9. BruceInOz

    BruceInOz Senior Member

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    I can't see the second figure, just a "Image hosted by tripod" logo

    ETA sorry, it's there now.
     
  10. BruceInOz

    BruceInOz Senior Member

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    Doesn't mono/glandular fever usually go unnoticed in younger kids as just a normal cold/flu? It might be just that it is only the older cohort that get prolonged symptoms that give cause to look for EBV.
     
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