1. Patients launch $1.27 million crowdfunding campaign for ME/CFS gut microbiome study.
    Check out the website, Facebook and Twitter. Join in donate and spread the word!
Give ME the Money
Graham McPhee spells out some of the cold, hard facts about the dismal state of ME research and politics, and has some suggestions as to what we can do about it ...
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Cognitive testing causes mental exhaustion lasting days

Discussion in 'Phoenix Rising Articles' started by Phoenix Rising Team, Mar 17, 2014.

  1. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,254
    Likes:
    3,141
    @peggy-sue
    Yes, to turn off chat, just click on the rightmost chat tab (the one that says ".. People Here"). Then at the top of the chat window that pops up, the click on the little cog wheel symbol, and select "Turn Off".
     
    peggy-sue likes this.
  2. peggy-sue

    peggy-sue

    Messages:
    2,494
    Likes:
    2,876
    Scotland
    Wheeeee, thanks, Hip!

    I was even able to read your instructions at the same time as doing it - no horrid little computery boxy bits appeared occluding everything, I didn't have to keep bouncing from one window to another, forgetting what I'd just read by the time I get the next one open.

    Why can't the business of using computers be made people friendly?

    Thanks for that idea, MeSci:love:
    As you might be able to see, I have done it. Hopefully, if I've ignored somebody, they'll see it (unless they've got me on an ignore because of my "rudeness")
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2014
    aimossy and MeSci like this.
  3. Wayne

    Wayne Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,221
    Likes:
    1,373
    Ashland, Oregon
    I can totally relate, on just about every count. Trying to keep up with conversations is especially challenging. When the conversants are people who tend to interrupt each other, it's even more difficult. I much prefer one person at a time talking, not only in personal conversations, but in TV interviews where's there's more than one guest.
     
    MeSci and peggy-sue like this.
  4. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6

    Messages:
    3,858
    Likes:
    4,619
    Cornwall, UK
    I have to turn off programmes where people interrupt each other, or talk at the same time, or when random music keeps kicking in during speech. I often find myself clutching my head in distress and shouting "Stop it!" or similar as I rush to turn it off.
     
    peggy-sue likes this.
  5. peggy-sue

    peggy-sue

    Messages:
    2,494
    Likes:
    2,876
    Scotland
    I wish they wouldn't put such loud background music behind speech.

    Are there not tvs with a feature for turning background noise off, to assist folk with hearing difficulties?

    I have to look away if things move too fast (can't stand "action" films) and ask M who got killed and who survived.

    I spent the entire film Braveheart, unable to look at anything, so I've not a clue what happened. It was just a lot of unpleasant noise.

    I can't bear audience noise, or applause...
    I'm a right moaner.:rolleyes:
     
    aimossy, greebo and MeSci like this.
  6. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,254
    Likes:
    3,141
    One of the things I find grates on the mind is the fast-paced camera editing used in many modern films, where you never get more than around 3 seconds on any one scene or face, before the next scene appears, ie, where the whole film is just a series of short edits around 3 seconds long. The Bourne Identity is one such film like this that comes to mind.

    My brain finds it uncomfortable to process this constant rapid change of visual scenery in these films. For healthy people, no doubt this fast-paced editing lends an edgy, exciting feel to the film; but for me, it ruins my enjoyment of the film.

    Also, the shaky camerawork used in many modern films I find a little unpleasant.

    I prefer older films, where cameras were solidly fixed to dollies, so that they did not shake, and where directors tended to use lingering, longer shots on scenes and faces.
     
    Ninjas, peggy-sue, MeSci and 3 others like this.
  7. Leopardtail

    Leopardtail Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,034
    Likes:
    621
    England
    My TV is an LG. It can't turn background music off, but does have some mysterious feature that selectively boosts voice VERY well and thereby allows volume to be turned down. That prevents the loud music terrorising me. Lot's of TV's have this feature but it works much better on the LGs - it also has very good sound quality which helps me a lot. There is a company called "Richer Sounds" that sells via the web in britain and gives much better info on sound issues.
     
    peggy-sue likes this.
  8. Wayne

    Wayne Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,221
    Likes:
    1,373
    Ashland, Oregon
    Ditto, ditto, ditto on the comments about unwelcome music (even in PBS documentaries for heaven's sake), and fast paced camera and film editing. They apparently believe they need to do this to keep viewers' attention, but research has been done showing that slow-paced learning of all kinds keeps people's attention far better.
     
    peggy-sue and Leopardtail like this.
  9. Valentijn

    Valentijn Activity Level: 3

    Messages:
    6,711
    Likes:
    10,215
    Amersfoort, Netherlands
    If you have surround sound, and the program supports it, you can use that to listen. And you can change the settings to make the center speaker (which usually has the dialogue coming out of it) much louder. I turn that one up as much as possible, and I also turn the bass down as far as possible. Then everything sounds about right - I can hear the dialogue without my eardrums being blown away by special effects noises.
     
  10. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6

    Messages:
    3,858
    Likes:
    4,619
    Cornwall, UK
    TV news and documentaries often use these silly effects now, such as suddenly switching from colour to monochrome and back again, going from a full-body shot to a close-up of someone's hands, etc. It's as though the cameraperson feels compelled to show off all the weird arty techniques they have learned, or wants to dictate to the viewer what s/he should be focusing on.

    I like to decide what to focus on, and we are all different, so I wish they would just give us the full shot and let us look around as we do when interacting in real life.

    It has also become increasingly common on UK TV to suddenly change the speed of a price of film.

    Like you, I just find it all so distracting that I can't follow what's happening.

    Some of this is probably due to fatigue of the eye muscles.
     
    peggy-sue and Leopardtail like this.
  11. Leopardtail

    Leopardtail Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,034
    Likes:
    621
    England
    Not sure about eye muscles (for me personally), but it definitely overloads cognition. Where they are jumping backwards and forwards in time though, I do find it helpful when the 'historical stuff' is in mono - lowers cognitive demand. The thing I find hardest though is definitely volume jumping up and down.
     
  12. peggy-sue

    peggy-sue

    Messages:
    2,494
    Likes:
    2,876
    Scotland
    What's an LG?
    I get all confused where they jump back and forward in time too. Or have more than one story going on at the same time. (CSI does that a lot)
     
  13. Leopardtail

    Leopardtail Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,034
    Likes:
    621
    England
    LG is a brand of TV, they seem to have better 'voice enahancement' and generally better sound for their price point in some models.
    I find music shows are much better on mine than with most TVs without surround sound. Less distortion, less booming, less awful peaks in volume.
     
  14. peggy-sue

    peggy-sue

    Messages:
    2,494
    Likes:
    2,876
    Scotland
    I hate surround sound!
    I keep getting frights when something seems to come from elsewhere in the room...
     
    aimossy likes this.
  15. Leopardtail

    Leopardtail Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,034
    Likes:
    621
    England
    Thanks peggy, that made me smile.....
     
  16. peggy-sue

    peggy-sue

    Messages:
    2,494
    Likes:
    2,876
    Scotland
    :p
    Frights are not fun. I jump, it makes me move the leg with sciatica in it. It HURTS.:(
    If the cat is sitting on me, she gets a fright because I've jumped - so she leaps up and digs claws in.
    That hurts too.:(
     
  17. Leopardtail

    Leopardtail Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,034
    Likes:
    621
    England
    I pictured myself doing the same thing hence the amusement was at myself. Sorry if that was not clear. My cat (now deceased) was at times so skittish she would have made me jump due to the claws. At others she just scouled at me as if to say "quit the jumping and chillax, I am sleeping here".

    Of those things, the sciatica (I suffered it briefly) was definitely the worst. Have you found anything that helps for the sciatica?
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2014
  18. peggy-sue

    peggy-sue

    Messages:
    2,494
    Likes:
    2,876
    Scotland
    Keeping active!:rolleyes:

    Don't worry, I did do a :p to indicate that I understood, (before launching into my melodramatic moan.)

    It's ok when I'm pottering around during the day. I need strong prescription painkillers to get me through the night.

    Muzz and I had a very strange co-ordinated jumping in fright last week - she did the first one, but she must have hit some point in my pelvis that caused a "knee-jerk" reaction in me,

    with the reaction only going via my spine not up to my brain and back down- so it was practically simultaneous, not one being jumping, then another being jumping.

    It had me completely confused for a few moments.
     
  19. Leopardtail

    Leopardtail Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,034
    Likes:
    621
    England
    I had those 'sciatica' style pains before I started on Mito supplements and antioxidants. I came to the conclusion it was due to oxidative damage to my nerves. In me it produced a 'burning rods' sensation running along the nerves.

    Funny though with high fatigue you could shock me near into a heart attack, but I had no reflexes so the 'knee jerk' thing disappeared completely. I have seen some stuff thyroid related to do with reflexes but have not followed it up.

    Well if anybody is entitled to a bit of melodrama, I think that would be us. LOL
     
    peggy-sue likes this.
  20. peggy-sue

    peggy-sue

    Messages:
    2,494
    Likes:
    2,876
    Scotland
    I have one leg "functionally" shorter than the other.:cautious:

    They haven't suggested it's somatoform, or sent me to a shrink for it yet. :rolleyes:

    But I haven't been sent to a shrink for my ME either.
    Apparently there was one in Dundee, but he was desperately oversubscribed, so refusing to take any more on, and not having any success anyway. (That's what my gp told me. But he is known to tell lies.)

    I am 5' 0" when I stand one one of them, and 5' 2" if I stand on the other.
    The sciatica is caused by the imbalance in my hips, something is pressing on some major nerve right inside my right buttock, (it sends pains up and down the whole leg, jerks, twitches, etc.)
    and the fact that I now tend to walk on a camber.:D
     
    aimossy likes this.

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page