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Cognitive deficits in cfs and their relationship to psychological status, symptomatology, function

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by snowathlete, Mar 27, 2013.

  1. snowathlete

    snowathlete

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    Cognitive deficits in chronic fatigue syndrome and their relationship to psychological status, symptomatology, and everyday functioning.
    Cockshell SJ, Mathias JL.
    Source

    School of Psychology.
    Abstract

    Objective: To examine cognitive deficits in people with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and their relationship to psychological status, CFS symptoms, and everyday functioning. Method: The current study compared the cognitive performance (reaction time, attention, memory, motor functioning, verbal abilities, and visuospatial abilities) of a sample with CFS (n = 50) with that of a sample of healthy controls (n = 50), all of whom had demonstrated high levels of effort and an intention to perform well, and examined the extent to which psychological status, CFS symptoms, and everyday functioning were related to cognitive performance. Results: The CFS group showed impaired information processing speed (reaction time), relative to the controls, but comparable performance on tests of attention, memory, motor functioning, verbal ability, and visuospatial ability. Moreover, information processing speed was not related to psychiatric status, depression, anxiety, the number or severity of CFS symptoms, fatigue, sleep quality, or everyday functioning. Conclusion: A slowing in information processing speed appears to be the main cognitive deficit seen in persons with CFS whose performance on effort tests is not compromised. Importantly, this slowing does not appear to be the consequence of other CFS-related variables, such as depression and fatigue, or motor speed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).
     
  2. Enid

    Enid Senior Member

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    Hmmm - still dabbling these psychos.
     
    Wayne likes this.
  3. kaffiend

    kaffiend Senior Member

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    I used to test my reaction times on various measures (computer based with millisecond precision) and they were extremely slowed or I simply couldn't come up with a response during crash periods. I still have a worsening of "effortful recall" on PEM days. By effortful recall, I mean anything that I try to do, e.g., tie my shoes, come up with a word or name, takes longer.

    Where is this published? I can get the full text.
     
  4. Little Bluestem

    Little Bluestem Senescent on the Illinois prairie, USA

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    Passing tests on a single function at a time in a lab is one thing. Employing these functions together during real life is another.
     
    Marco, Wayne, SOC and 2 others like this.
  5. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Senior Member

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    It's not the most enlightening study, but still useful in a way. Perhaps the most interesting omission is that they didn't attempt to discuss treatments at all. (CBT etc. was not mentioned)
     
    Valentijn likes this.
  6. Nico

    Nico Senior Member

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    on a lighter note, I really stink at "Song Pop" game on Facebook....part of winning is a faster reaction time than opponents. So, even though this study doesn't say a whole of a lot more.... I'd have to agree with the premise. Song Pop has proven to me that my reaction time is slo-mo. And, as far as identifying songs, I have to agree with kaffiend.... the more tired I am, the harder the recall and recognition of the song. anyway, who knew Song Pop could be a barometer for this
     
  7. Simon

    Simon

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    I've now blogged about this article: Brain Fog: The Research, also covering a very good meta-analysis by the same authors, as well as a large (n=300) recent study.
     

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