Severe ME Day of Understanding and Remembrance: Aug. 8, 2017
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Cognitive and behavioral coping in people with CFS: An exploratory study...

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by AndyPR, Aug 18, 2017.

  1. AndyPR

    AndyPR Cookies for Tired Sam

    Surprised this hasn't been posted already, let me know if I missed it.
    Full access here http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1359105317707259
     
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  2. GreyOwl

    GreyOwl Dx: strong belief system, avoidance, hypervigilant

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    I came to do a search on beta adrenergic receptor antibodies, and instead came across this.

    LOL.
     
  3. Manganus

    Manganus Senior Member

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    Once a diagnostic tool is widely accepted, this kind of studies might provide good help.

    Until then, ... this paper is far too vague. Particularly the inclusion criteria makes it only slightly more convincing than an experienced clinicians educated guesses.
     
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  4. Woolie

    Woolie Senior Member

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    Its a fairly sympathetic study.

    The results were that two coping strategies were associated with lower depression scores. They were positive refocusing, which refers to thinking about joyful and pleasant issues instead of thinking about the CFS; and positive reappraisal, which refers to thoughts of attaching a positive meaning to the CFS in terms of personal growth.

    That's mildly interesting. I certainly find the first strategy gives me some comfort. F**d though if I'll consider it a personal growth experience!

    Their scale also included a measure of 'catastrophising', described as 'thoughts of explicitly emphasizing the terror of the CFS'. This was positively assocaited with depression (the more you did it, the higher your depression score). But that's not a strategy, is it? The strategy would be if you actively engage distraction techniques to reduce those thoughts. Besides, catstrophising seems to be inextricably linked to the depression - probably a product of it, not a cause. So the idea that if we stop the catstrophising we won't be depressed is kind of arse backwards.

    (I suddenly had a ridiculous thought of a cartoon guy in front of a firing squad, he's yelling 'I'm gonna die!', and his psychologist behind him is saying 'see, you're catastrophising again, Frank!'.)

    Cautionary note: they examined a heck of a lot of variables on just 36 patients.
     
  5. arewenearlythereyet

    arewenearlythereyet Biscuit Antagonist

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    I suppose that is the final treatment for the hopeless cases....don't tell the BPS crew they will write a paper on it. I can imagine the FOI case to get the data on that one...ends up 100% improved with the hopeless cases removed from the data set and the planet.
     
  6. trishrhymes

    trishrhymes Senior Member

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    It seemed to me from reading the abstract that they really hadn't discovered anything except the fact that their questionnaires measuring positive thinking and catastrophising were correlating with their measures respectively of not depressed and depressed.

    Since people who are not depressed are likely to have at least some positive thoughts and people who are depressed are likely to have negative/catastrophising thoughts by definition, surely all they were doing was showing one type of questioning gave the same answer as the other type of questioning.

    Am I making any sense here? I can't see that this advances us at all. Surely the same results would apply for anyone answering these questionnaires, not just ME patients.

    And I agree, @Woolie , I can't see that I've gained anything in 'personal growth' from being ill for 27 years. And if I thought I should try, I'd be doomed to failure and another layer of guilt to be added. No thanks.

    I feel very lucky not to be depressed as well, but take no personal credit for that.
     
  7. A.B.

    A.B. Senior Member

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    The illness has deprived me of personal growth more than it has given me opportunities for personal growth.
     
  8. Woolie

    Woolie Senior Member

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    Haha, yea. Health care utilisation ad benefits receipt were both reduced following treatment. Unfortuntaley, the patient was lost to follow up,
     
  9. trishrhymes

    trishrhymes Senior Member

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    Yep, definitely comes out top on the cost effectiveness treatments. Line us up and shoot us. I'm amazed the DWP doesn't make it a prerequisite for disability benefits.
     
  10. ash0787

    ash0787 Senior Member

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    I don't get why its part of cfs research, its an extremely common psychological problem to the point where its almost a factor of everyday life, and psychology people already know how to approach it or at least they should if they studied for their qualifications properly, are they trying to suggest that the nature of the phenomenon somehow differs in origin or nature in CFS so as to warrant separate investigation ?
     
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  11. Woolie

    Woolie Senior Member

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    Its of some modest value to discover if there are any coping strategies that help reduce distress in MECFS specifically. We're not able to engage in some of the ones 'healthies' use.

    Plus, MECFS is a particular situational stressor that might present different challenges to people, than, say, depression with no identifiable precipitating events, or depression due to loss of a loved one, unemployment, etc.
     
  12. Starsister

    Starsister

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    Not to give these writers any credit for the concept, but I do understand the value of finding something positive to come from the CFS. I've been sick for over 35 yrs, symptoms started mild, and with episodes of remission, but what has been most helpful to me with the grief, loss, depression and dispair has been my recent reframing if my life where I can derive meaning from my condition by trying to help others. What else can one do when we can't change the immediate situation? I'm 63 and facing problems of aging as well, and looking to make sense of my life before I die.

    I've been a mental health provider nearly 30 yrs and realized recently I'd been in denial of the emotional toll it has taken on me, and by understanding that better, I am now incorporating that knowledge into how I work with my clients with chronic health issues. Rather than feeling that my life and career is over and that my future is over, I at least feel there is something I can take from the experience to help others, or to advance the cause by speaking up, raising awareness, advocating for research funding etc. In the stages of grief, those being denial, anger, bargaining (what could I have done better) acceptance, and reinvestment, I feel that at least I have more of a handle on reinvesting in my life and a future.

    It has spurred a renewal of my spiritual exploration, and forced me to reach out to others and ask for help, which I've never been good at, thereby decreasing my social isolation.

    I'm reminded of Dr Bernie Siegle's studies with persons with cancer and AIDS, and how some patients described emotional and spiritual transformations from dealing with their illness, often describing how they became happier people, regardless of whether they got well or not. If someone who had NOT been through hell with their health would say this to me, I'd want to punch them in the face. If the medical system and government tried to use this as an excuse for not trying to find a cure, I'd fight like hell. But personally, I try to find value and meaning in my situation, while I continue to work toward health.
     
  13. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    http://www.enhertsccg.nhs.uk/sites/...ital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS).docx

    Depression questions from Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS)


    0-3 for each item

    The items that relate to depression are:

     
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  14. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    They do mention this briefly:
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2017
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  15. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    They do discuss how the results relate to the general public:

    Also from the introduction:

     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2017
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  16. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    I'm reminded of somebody who developed depression and anxiety alongside their ME. They tried to die by suicide a few times and eventually did take their own life.

    I was unimpressed with the approach I heard the mental health professionals were taking in her case. They were encouraging her to do normal activities such as taking a part-time job, going back to full-time education and other behavioural suggestions. While these might suit some people with depression and anxiety, they didn't seem to suit somebody with ME as well.
     
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  17. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ) subscale questions are given in table 2 here

    https://openaccess.leidenuniv.nl/bi...aaijpsychometricfeaturesadults.pdf?sequence=2

     
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  18. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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  19. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    Yes, or at least not unsympathetic.

    It did not talk about graded activity/deconditioning or associated theories.
     
  20. Woolie

    Woolie Senior Member

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    You know, you're right @Starsister. I can think of insights I've gained from having the disease. Compassion, definitely. And withholding of judgement about others. A much more nuanced view of the world. And insight into the dangers that loose thinking in Psychology can do.

    And I was a smug git before I got sick. Sailed effortlessly through life never realising how much luck I had working in my favour.

    I still refuse to interpret CFS as a life lesson, but I have to admit there are a few (modest) pluses to have come of it.

    I was recently talking to a person with fibro. She is often in pain, and never knows when it will strike. She said if she had the power to go back and change her life so she never had FM, she wouldn't do it. She feels that enduring FM has made her the person she is today. I certainly don't think that. But still, you gotta respect it.
     
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