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Clove Oil

Discussion in 'Pain and Inflammation' started by acrosstheveil, Aug 7, 2014.

  1. acrosstheveil

    acrosstheveil Senior Member

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    I have found clove oil to be one of the most effective things for pain. It is AMAZING. You can apply a drop topically to specific areas but don't use more than one drop or it can burn a bit. You should probably use it with a carrier oil (diluted) when applying topically but, for me, it is ok in small amounts. The burn isn't too bad like with oregano oil.

    For whole body pain you can rub it into the bottoms of your feet in high amounts. You can pretty much use as much as you want on the bottom of your feet and it will not burn at all. I usually use 5-10 drops and massage it into the bottoms of my feet for 10-15 minutes. The skin is thick there so it doesn't burn like other areas of the body. Make sure to wash your hands when you are done. I made the mistake of using the bathroom without washing my hands first once....:eek:
     
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  2. pemone

    pemone Senior Member

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    What is the reported mechanism for relieving whole body pain?
     
  3. pemone

    pemone Senior Member

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    I am reading online that clove oil is one of the most effective chemicals for dealing with hydroxyl radicals, which are by far the most destructive form of free radical produced intracellularly.

    Does anyone know:

    1) What is the recommended dosing when taking clove oil in a drink to produce this benefit?

    2) Does anyone have links to any studies showing this effect?

    3) Does clove oil taken in the diet orally absorb through the gut, and does it pass into the intracellular environment?
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2014
  4. Sushi

    Sushi Senior Member Albuquerque

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    I guess that is why people are told to keep a clove on an aching tooth.
    Sushi
     
  5. acrosstheveil

    acrosstheveil Senior Member

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    don't know.
     
  6. Calathea

    Calathea Senior Member

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    Yikes, don't take it internally, it'd be dangerous! I've used it now and again. What I've done is to put carrier oil on the area first, then the neat clove oil. So it's not really diluted, it's the same amount, but there's some carrier oil there to lessen the impact on my skin. I must try the foot thing, although I can't tolerate masage, it makes my fibro pain flare up. Does it work if you just bung the clove oil on your feet?
     
  7. Marvynx

    Marvynx

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    I have no experience taking clove oil orally, but I have been taking cinnamon leaf oil for the last three months. Clove oil and cinnamon leaf oil have one thing in common: they both contain very high percentages of eugenol.
    Eugenol and its derivates are very effective in trapping hydroxyl radicals. They are also very effective in killing viruses and bacteria.

    The (diluted!) cinnamon oil I use seems to be absorbed well through the gut and further into the intracellular environment without any problem.
     
    CantThink likes this.
  8. CantThink

    CantThink Senior Member

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    @Marvynx

    How much do you take? Do you take it in water?
     
  9. Marvynx

    Marvynx

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    I started with a few drops and gradually increased the dosage. At the moment I´m taking 3x10 drops/day, always diluted with a spoonful of vegetable oil (olive oil, or any other edible oil). I dilute the cinnamon leaf oil to 4% or less.

    After I started with the cinnamon leaf oil three months ago my energy level has definitely gone up and recovery after exercise is not that long any more.

    Apart from die off reactions within my lymphatic system and a few headaches
    I have experienced no major side effects, but other cinnamon leaf oil brands may be stronger (higher percentage eugenol) and other ME patients may be (much) less tolerant for cinnamon leaf oil when taken orally.
     
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  10. CantThink

    CantThink Senior Member

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    Thank you for the information @Marvynx
     
  11. xrayspex

    xrayspex Senior Member

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    I have been using clove oil on a bad tooth and it helps a lot! It does sometimes burn side of my mouth. i have been using q tip to put it around tooth. why is it bad internally? not that I want to take internally but probably some gets swallowed. it is used in baking....
    I didnt think to put on other parts for pain; peppermint essential oil has been lifesaver for neck pain, will try clove.
     
  12. South

    South Senior Member

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    It only could be bad internally if more is swallowed than would normally be in baked desserts, like gingerbread has. Like anything, a certain amount is fine, even beneficial to swallow (such as in gingerbread, where clove powder is reputed to sooth the stomach). Clove powder does have some of the oil in it.

    And like anything, there is such a thing as too much, when swallowed.

    I think that's all people mean when they say don't swallow the oil, the straight oil is pretty strong.
     
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  13. IreneF

    IreneF Senior Member

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    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oil_of_clove

    Taking in large amounts of cloves or clove oil may cause nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhea, burns in the mouth and throat, sore throat, seizures, difficulty breathing, rapid heartbeat, sleepiness, intestinal bleeding, and liver or kidney failure.[2]More serious effects have been reported in young children, even with small doses.[2]

    Severe reactions may occur in people with allergy to cloves (about 1.5% of the population).[2]

    More info at

    https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/251.html
     
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  14. South

    South Senior Member

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    Yes, but not if taking/eating it in small amounts instead.

    Like everything in nature, even water (did you know you can overdose drinking water?), there is a sweet spot of doseage where something does good things, above which it can do harm. That doesn't mean the substance is always "bad".

    Sprinkling ground cloves, from the ordinary grocery store, on one's morning oatmeal is a nice way to get a dose of it that is within this "sweet spot" of usefulness and safety.
     
  15. IreneF

    IreneF Senior Member

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    Yes, that's the problem. What's a "large amount"? I didn't find anything in my (brief) research that indicated what a "regular" dose is. The footnote in the Wikipedia quote didn't link to an active page.

    The medline plus page was more informative but had less info on adverse effects.

    I suspect that ingesting clove oil over time would leave you emitting an aroma of mouthwash.
     
  16. xrayspex

    xrayspex Senior Member

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    could be worse things than smelling like mouthwash ;)
     

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