Review: 'Through the Shadowlands’ describes Julie Rehmeyer's ME/CFS Odyssey
I should note at the outset that this review is based on an audio version of the galleys and the epilogue from the finished work. Julie Rehmeyer sent me the final version as a PDF, but for some reason my text to voice software (Kurzweil) had issues with it. I understand that it is...
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Clear Links Found Between Inflammation, Bacterial Communities and Cancer

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Waverunner, Aug 17, 2012.

  1. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

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    Don't worry, in 20 to 30 years from now we will have tests and maybe even treatment...

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120816141527.htm

    ScienceDaily (Aug. 16, 2012) — What if a key factor ultimately behind a cancer was not a genetic defect but ecological?

    Ecologists have long known that when some major change disturbs an environment in some way, ecosystem structure is likely to change dramatically. Further, this shift in interconnected species' diversity, abundances, and relationships can in turn have a transforming effect on health of the whole landscape -- causing a rich woodland or grassland to become permanently degraded, for example -- as the ecosystem becomes unstable and then breaks down the environment.
    For this reason, it should come as no surprise that a significant disturbance in the human body can profoundly alter the makeup of otherwise stable microbial communities co-existing within it and that changes in the internal ecology known as the human microbiome can result in unexpected and drastic consequences for human health.
    A report published in the August 16 online edition of the journal Science gives evidence for such a chain reaction. It has long been known that gut inflammation is a risk factor for cancer. The new study suggests that this may be in part because inflammation disturbs gut ecosystems leading to conditions that allow pathogens to invade the gut. These pathogens may damage host cells increasing the risk of the development of colorectal cancer.
    The authors of the study were Janelle C. Arthur, Ernesto Perez-Chanona, Marcus Mühlbauer, Sarah Tomkovich, Joshua M. Uronis, Ting-Jia Fan, Christian Jobin, Arlin B. Rogers, Jonathan J. Hansen, and Temitope O. Keku from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Barry J. Campbell and Jonathan M. Rhodes from the University of Liverpool; Turki Abujamel and Alain Stintzi from the University of Ottawa; Belgin Dogan and Kenneth W. Simpson from Cornell University; and Anthony A. Fodor from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.
     
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  2. Glynis Steele

    Glynis Steele Senior Member

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    Newcastle upon Tyne UK
    Hi Waverunner,

    Looks like you beat me to this one, lol!
     
  3. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

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    Yes, by whopping 5 minutes. That was my main goal for today ;-)
    Your T. gondii article is very nice though.
     
  4. Glynis Steele

    Glynis Steele Senior Member

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    Newcastle upon Tyne UK
    Thanks, I think I was editing my thread when you posted yours, must be quicker next time!
     

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