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Cleanliness in between showering

Discussion in 'Lifestyle Management' started by Horizon, Nov 23, 2016.

  1. Horizon

    Horizon Senior Member

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    Showering is one of the hardest things on me and right now I am about once a week (which feels gross and the smell aint great!)

    I have tried baby wipes to keep clean in the interim but it's really not doing the trick I feel super sweaty and stinky (sorry for the TMI).

    Any tips or good products that help get rid of stink? I would prefer without chemicals but that may not be an option.
     
    Izola, lauluce, -Jessie- and 2 others like this.
  2. PennyIA

    PennyIA Senior Member

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    Well, I popped in thinking I'd offer the baby wipes option.

    :oops:

    I've done two things... the first was using a shower chair so that I could shower more often with less issues.

    But, since I've started taking epsom salt baths, I've substituted a bath before bed every other or every third night. Still followed by bed as it still wears me out.
     
    Mary, L'engle, belize44 and 1 other person like this.
  3. trishrhymes

    trishrhymes Senior Member

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    If you're needing to do this in bed, have you tried having a bowl of warm water beside you with a little nice smelling liquid soap in it and a flannel, and just wipe yourself a bit at a time and dunk the flannel back in the bowl until you have the energy for the next bit. If you can get to the bathroom, my method is sit on the loo lid, and do a basin wash, concentrating on the smelliest bits.

    It's a horrible feeling, I do sympathise. I used to shower every day, now it's 2 or 3 times a week.

    Are you eligible for a paid helper? I used to wash my hair in the shower once a week, which totally exhausted me for the rest of the day. (when I was well, it was twice a week). Now I pay a carer to come in and help me. She does all the energetic rubbing, towelling, brushing etc which means I'm not completely wiped out. But it's an expensive luxury.

    Also to save the effort of rubbing dry after a shower, wrap yourself in towels or a towelling bath robe and let it do the work.

    I've also heard of, but not tried, stainless steel as a deodoriser. A quick web search found this:
    http://www.blueplanetgreenliving.com/2010/05/06/stainless-steel-deodorant/


    Best wishes.
     
    MastBCrazy, Starlight, Jan and 7 others like this.
  4. Horizon

    Horizon Senior Member

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    Oh, yeah the chair is a lifesaver.

    I haven't considered the wash basin in bed which is an interesting idea. But wouldn't you kind of have soapy residue on yourself and get the bed wet?

    I would not want a paid helper to help with showering but I should probably invest a good robe so I don't have to towel dry myself as much.
     
    Pen2 and Invisible Woman like this.
  5. belize44

    belize44 Senior Member

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    I sit on a plastic step stool in the shower and use the hose attachment. Sometimes all I can do is soap the worst bits and just rinse with the hose. My hair has to be let go most of the time, alas.
    BTW, this liquid soap is awesome; nothing synthetic and very gentle; also not expensive!
    http://www.baar.com/palma-christi-liquid-soap
    Since discovering this soap, I have not looked back, TBH.
     
    Pen2, Mary, L'engle and 1 other person like this.
  6. PennyIA

    PennyIA Senior Member

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    Maybe two basins & cloths? One with water?

    And I would think you'd have to wring it out a bit to keep the bed from getting wet. I do know my sister (who doesn't have this) uses wash clothes while standing at the sink. I'd think if you could manage being upright in a chair it would help keep the bedding from getting damp.
     
    Horizon likes this.
  7. erin

    erin Senior Member

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    Good ideas here, has anyone tried dry shampoo for the hair? Is it too toxic?
     
  8. PennyIA

    PennyIA Senior Member

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    I have been too afraid to try dry shampoo. But I have heard that corn starch can do the same thing... but that you have to be very careful to keep it from clumping and looking aweful. Someone said they used a salt shaker like thing.... to do it.
     
    erin likes this.
  9. erin

    erin Senior Member

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    Corn starch is a good idea. But it can be messy as you say.
     
  10. trishrhymes

    trishrhymes Senior Member

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    If you only put a few drops of mild liquid soap in the water it won't matter if you leave it not rinsed off. When I do a basin wash in the bathroom I don't bother to wash the slightly soapy water off.

    And yes, you'd have to squeeze out the flannel well if you're doing it in bed. You could have a small towel too. I haven't actually tried it except as a child when my mum would sometimes wash me in bed when I was ill. That's what gave me the idea.

    Alternatively, whenever you get up to go to the loo, do a bit of a wash of some bit of you in the bathroom - as well as your hands obviously. Or you could take several damp flannels back to bed to wipe bits of you when you have the energy, and rinse them next time you go to the bathroom.

    Or, probably easiest of all, learn to love your smelly self! Ha Ha. I haven't managed that one yet.
     
    MastBCrazy and MeSci like this.
  11. alice111

    alice111 Senior Member

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    I don't have much to offer everyone seems to have said it all.. it's an adjustment just offer a "I feel your pain" :thumbdown:
     
    Mary and hellytheelephant like this.
  12. Valentijn

    Valentijn Senior Member

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    When I couldn't get upstairs to shower for a few weeks, we finally got an inflatable shampoo basin. Then I could just lie on my bed while my fiance did the washing, conditioning, and rinsing. It would also work well with a carer if you're shy about getting nekkid with a stranger :oops:

    I used a bucket of soapy water for spot-cleaning stinky bits, and another bucket of clean water for rinsing.
     
    MastBCrazy and hellytheelephant like this.
  13. hellytheelephant

    hellytheelephant Senior Member

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    For anyone with hair longer than v short, I can recommend a towelling turban. I put in on my hair whilst I dry the rest, then put a towel on the pillow, shake out hair and let it air dry.
     
    Izola, Jan, erin and 2 others like this.
  14. purrsian

    purrsian Senior Member

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    I sometimes use this dry shampoo from Lush - https://au.lush.com/products/no-drought
    Lush has a big focus on natural products that are non-toxic and environmentally friendly. I just shake some onto my hand and try to shove it under the lengths of my hair to the roots, which is of course the oiliest and worst feeling. It leaves my hair feeling a little dry, but I prefer that to the horrible oily itchy feeling. If you don't get it under the lengths of your hair enough, it may leave a powdery residue on top of your hair which isn't ideal but I don't mind if I'm just going to be at home. But if it's there and I need to go out, I just wipe a little water onto the top of my hair using my hands.

    I also agree with helly, towelling turbans are amazing. I have long hair so it doesn't dry much, but it helps keep it out of the way while I dry my body and have a quick rest before dealing with drying my hair. I also use it instead of a shower cap if I'm not washing my hair.

    Also on a side note, using a good deodorant (not just body spray) is helpful to reduce odour buildup. I use QV spray deodorant as it's the only aluminium free deodorant I've found that works and I react to almost everything else. I also keep a face washer handy to help dry off a little if I get clammy. I figure this is also helpful in reducing skin reactions, as I often get reactions to bras or elastic in clothes but only when I sweat.
     
    hellytheelephant and erin like this.
  15. SilverbladeTE

    SilverbladeTE Senior Member

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    Somewhere near Glasgow, Scotland
    I used to use Blue Savlon liquid diluted in water when showering to help keep skin problems down, alas it's no longer made :(
    Much gentler less problems than with Dettol which does have lot more issues and has to used very very diluted :/


    Hygene problems are another reason this illness is so soul destroying, sigh
     
    Mary, hellytheelephant and Jennifer J like this.
  16. IreneF

    IreneF Senior Member

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    I went for a few years without a shower. I washed at the sink, when I could, using Cetaphil or something similar. It's non-irritating and doesn't need to be rinsed, but it's not as effective as soap. It's kind of slimy if you don't rinse. Since then I've found other cleansers for people who can't bathe or shower. I didn't find that a shower chair was helpful because I was heat-sensitive.

    It's important to use unscented products. Essential oils can be irritating and sensitizing. (I really like scented soap, tho. Sometimes one has to compromise.)

    I washed my hair at the kitchen sink. It was easier than kneeling at the side of the tub. Never tried dry shampoo.

    It doesn't get too hot here so I don't use deodorant unless I'm too sick to wash.

    Try to keep your teeth clean. I just had ten fillings. Painful and expensive.
     
  17. purrsian

    purrsian Senior Member

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    For those with skin issues, QV also has a body wash and body lotion which my mum, who gets lots of skin problems, swears by. I'm not sure if it's available overseas, but QV is a great brand for those who are hypersensitive and reactive.
     
  18. taniaaust1

    taniaaust1 Senior Member

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    you may need your legs up when sitting in shower. I have to use a stool for my legs on top of using the shower chair
     
    Valentijn likes this.
  19. taniaaust1

    taniaaust1 Senior Member

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    As using some soap on flannel at the basin doesnt always get rid of my underarm odour even with scrubbing, I use mediswipes (alcohol swabs) for wiping under my arms. . The alcohol in them does give me a bit of a head rush but it passes in seconds. I do thou use a flannel with water on my girly parts - under breasts and down below sometimes once a day other times going longer. While doing that, I dont tend to use soap to save the need of having to get soap off. I just give things a good rub with flannel and water

    I usually then just shower once a week on shower chair with a stool for my legs..and wash/condition my long hair once every 3 weeks or so. My hair actually is okay going that long since I changed over to cleaning it just with a Tablespoon of bicarb soda in some water (leave on for 1min before rising off) and then conditioning it with a Tablespoon of vinegar mixed with water (leave on for 1min then rinse off). With using those natural things over time its been able to go longer and longer without having to be washed.

    I dont dry my hair but just wrap it up in a bulky towel before heading back to bed (I at times get my pillow a bit wet doing that esp since my hair is almost down to my elbows but my pillow dries or I just find a dry part of the towel to lay on.).

    I havent needed to do this for a while but any oily spots eg if I wanted my hair to go a few day more without needing a wash.. a tiny bit of bicarb soda rubbed into those gets rid of the oiliness while a tiny bit of coconut on dry ends if needed does wonders (both things you can keep by bed).

    I wonder if my hair no longer gets oily at all eg 3 weeks and its still not oily.. as I no longer brush it except when Im being taken shopping. So i guess Im not stimulating the oil glands I use in a spray bottle a table spoon of vinegar mixed with water as a detangler before I brush hair.

    I wont use anti-perspirants as our sweat is our bodies way of releasing toxins.. so just using natural deodourants (the last one I brought was crap and does nothing and now also gone all grungy under the lid (not recommended an organic coconut deodorant bySonya Driver).. I got to buy another).

    My hair after 3 weeks no washing still feels far better then some peoples hair feels after only 2-3 days without a wash, I think due to the fact I went to using the things I use on it now (which seem to be far better then even the natural shampoos and conditioners one buys).

    I'd hate to know what my teeth are doing as they hardly ever get brushed (I find it difficult standing at a basin so they often just get left. I brush them shopping day (so unfortunately this is yellowing my teeth, maybe I should start daily swishing with hydrogen peroxide and count that as doing them)
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2016
  20. IreneF

    IreneF Senior Member

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    @taniaaust1
    I was just reading about how bad alcohol is for your skin. Perhaps you can find a gentle spray that doesn't need rinsing. I've got some, but I don't know whether it's sold Down Under.
     

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