A New Decade of ME Research: The 11th Invest in ME International ME Conference 2016
Mark Berry presents the first in a series of articles on the 11th Invest in ME International ME Conference in London ...
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Chronic pain changes our immune system

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Skippa, Jan 28, 2016.

  1. Skippa

    Skippa Senior Member

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  2. Skippa

    Skippa Senior Member

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    Is this a good source?

    Is this good science?

    If not, pls excuse my layman's interest.

    Anyways, the reason I thought it was interesting is thus:

    Imagine a fast epigenetic response as an evolutionary adaptation. At some point in our history this was a major plus point, carrying us through hard times, adapting to harsh environments, surviving disease outbreaks, whatever.

    Now, however, we have the means to mitigate these things ourselves. Controlled living environments, modern medicine, blah blah.

    So we get sick, get an immune response, get fatigued, achey, all the other stuff.

    For some people the "modern" interventions work wonders, we'll have you back on the road to recovery in a jiffy old chap.

    PWCME however experience epigenetic changes too fast? Or due to complications with the initial illness experience it too long (chronically).

    And so we get stuck in methylation/acetylation states that were only meant to be transitory, but modern interventions somehow screw this up?

    I dunno, just a thought, a loose idea...
     
  3. Skippa

    Skippa Senior Member

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    What I think I mean is, something (an infection?) causes an initial set of symptoms, but epigenetic changes keep one "locked in" to illness, which exarcerbates (sp?) over time, causing more epigenetic changes, until the body has so adapted to "the threat" that you can treat that, even completely eradicate it, but the chronic changes to the genes maintain the sickness behaviour indefinitely.
     

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