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Chronic Functional Bowel Syndrome Enhances Gut-Brain Axis Dysfunction, Neuroinflammation...

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Ecoclimber, Mar 6, 2014.

  1. Ecoclimber

    Ecoclimber Senior Member

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    Neurochem Res. 2014 Mar 4. [Epub ahead of print]
    Chronic Functional Bowel Syndrome Enhances Gut-Brain Axis Dysfunction, Neuroinflammation, Cognitive Impairment, and Vulnerability to Dementia.

    Daulatzai MA.
    Author information
    Abstract

    The irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common chronic functional gastrointestinal disorder world wide that lasts for decades. The human gut harbors a diverse population of microbial organisms which is symbiotic and important for well being.


    However, studies on conventional, germ-free, and obese animals have shown that alteration in normal commensal gut microbiota and an increase in pathogenic microbiota-termed "dysbiosis", impact gut function, homeostasis, and health.

    Diarrhea, constipation, visceral hypersensitivity, and abdominal pain arise in IBS from the gut-induced dysfunctional metabolic, immune, and neuro-immune communication. Dysbiosis in IBS is associated with gut inflammation. Gut-related inflammation is pivotal in promoting endotoxemia, systemic inflammation, and neuroinflammation.

    A significant proportion of IBS patients chronically consume alcohol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, and fatty diet; they may also suffer from co-morbid respiratory, neuromuscular, psychological, sleep, and neurological disorders.

    The above pathophysiological substrate is underpinned by dysbiosis, and dysfunctional bidirectional "Gut-Brain Axis" pathways. Pathogenic gut microbiota-related systemic inflammation (due to increased lipopolysaccharide and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and barrier dysfunction), may trigger neuroinflammation enhancing dysfunctional brain regions including hippocampus and cerebellum.

    These as well as dysfunctional vago-vagal gut-brain axis may promote cognitive impairment. Indeed, inflammation is characteristic of a broad spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases that manifest demntia. It is argued that an awareness of pathophysiological impact of IBS and implementation of appropriate therapeutic measures may prevent cognitive impairment and minimize vulnerability to dementia
     
    Ren and Marco like this.
  2. globalpilot

    globalpilot Senior Member

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    Ontario
    This is interesting but I have to say that fecal transplants have not changed my symptoms. At least not yet. I was thinking and reading along the lines of the above which led me to the transplants.
     
    Little Bluestem likes this.

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