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Chronic fatigue syndrome: the current status and future potentials of emerging biomarkers

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by Bob, Apr 24, 2014.

  1. Bob

    Bob

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    Chronic fatigue syndrome: the current status and future potentials of emerging biomarkers
    David B. Fischer, Arsani H. William, Adam C. Strauss, Elizabeth R. Unger, Leonard A. Jason, Gailen D. Marshall, Jordan D. Dimitrakoff
    Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior
    Vol. 2, Iss. 2, 2014
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21641846.2014.906066

     
    svetoslav80, PennyIA, Roy S and 2 others like this.
  2. Bob

    Bob

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    Interesting selection of authors!

    It would be interesting to see the full paper.
     
    svetoslav80, aimossy and Simon like this.
  3. SOC

    SOC Senior Member

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    Weirdly written abstract. The Purpose is more of a Background. The Methods don't actually describe the methods they used. The Results, Conclusions contain no actual results or conclusions. o_O Hopefully someone can get access to the full paper and tell us whether the methods were any good and what the conclusions actually are.
     
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  4. Kati

    Kati Patient in training

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    I agree, the abstract format is weak and not much info is provided to entice to view paper or purchase a copy.
     
  5. WillowJ

    WillowJ Senior Member

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    Isn't that Fred Friedberg's new journal? I thought it was to be open access, or was that only the inagural issue?
     
  6. Kati

    Kati Patient in training

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    I don't remember it being free access but quite honestly it should be. It's just that publishers need to be rewarded for publishing

    The name of the journal sucks.

    Lastly, sometimes physicians need to be paid to actually read content.
     
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  7. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Senior Member

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  8. Sean

    Sean Senior Member

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    Short version: We need to start doing what we should have started doing 30 years ago.
     
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  9. A.B.

    A.B. Senior Member

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    Hopefully they'll learn the lesson and abandon the concept of psychosomatic illness alltogether in order to prevent the same thing happening again in other areas. A psychosomatic diagnosis is on the same level as a diagnosis of demonic possession, the only difference is that one of them is out of fashion.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2014
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  10. biophile

    biophile Places I'd rather be.

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    http://www.lastwordonnothing.com/20...cal-unhelpful-about-chronic-fatigue-syndrome/

     
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  11. SOC

    SOC Senior Member

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    Since when are MS and lupus comorbid conditions to CFS? I thought they were exclusionary. Please tell me this research is not conflating ME/CFS with the symptom chronic fatigue.
     
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  12. Valentijn

    Valentijn Activity Level: 3

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    There's often a lot of diagnostic uncertainty with Lupus, if someone has symptoms but not the usual autoimmune antibodies or whatever. And people with MS often start out with a diagnosis of CFS - approximately 30% in one study?

    But those are both likely a matter of misdiagnosis, partially due to the bad CFS definition, not co-morbid diseases. I'd be curious to know how many that are supposedly co-morbid also have PEM.
     
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  13. Purple

    Purple Bundle of purpliness

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    Sometimes it seems some doctors use ME/CFS as a synonym for chronic fatigue and fibromyalgia as a synonym for chronic pain. So people end up with a diagnosis of e.g. lupus, CFS and fibro - when they could have lupus only with fatigue and pain being symptoms of lupus but being misdiagnosed as CFS and fibro.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2014
  14. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Ummm, can I guess? Psychosomatic illness is out of fashion?

    The history of psychogenic claims is a history of a mutable claim. As they are disproved, and they have been many many times, they simply move to the next disease group. They are not going to give up. Psychogenic medicine has to be tackled directly, and treated as it deserves (as pseudoscience) or its not going away. It has been proclaimed dead more than a few times, yet here it is.

    What will happen though, is that like with diabetes, gastric ulcers, arthritis, MS etc., ME will join the list of diseases formerly considered by some to be psychogenic.
     
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  15. anciendaze

    anciendaze Senior Member

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    Both illnesses have considerable margins for diagnostic error. Staff at a clinic specializing in MS told me about 20% of their patients don't actually meet strict diagnostic criteria. Lupus has a visible rash to distinguish it, but a very similar rash appears on some women after pregnancy who are not said to have lupus. Rashes and antibodies characteristic for SLE can also appear after treatment with some fairly common drugs. This can even go as far as causing nephritis, which is a serious complication of SLE. Is this drug-induced disease SLE? Who knows?

    Absent rash, high levels of known autoantibodies and/or classic lesions on nerves there is a lot of commonality between these two autoimmune illnesses and ME/CFS. It is quite possible understanding any one of these may clarify the etiology of the others.

    The problem we face here is that previous diagnostic criteria for ME/CFS were designed to treat any physiological difference as an exclusionary condition for what some involved were sure had to be a psychiatric problem. If you define something that way, this will necessarily result in a diagnostic wastebasket.

    While much concern has been concentrated on psychiatric comorbidity, which is high for both MS and SLE, there are quite a number of important comorbid medical problems that are not considered psychological at all. You can check on incidence rates of specific cancers, cardiovascular disease and metabolic diseases. Curiously, some cancers are less common (inverse comorbidity), while others are more common. This indicates a profound physiological disturbance associated with disease, not simple a problem of "being sick". Even a dyed-in-the-wool psychobabbler might be embarrassed if asked to explain how these could be psychogenic, assuming such people are capable of embarrassment.

    Some comorbid conditions parallel those suspected in ME/CFS, as much as current diagnostic confusion allows anyone to talk about comorbid conditions.
     
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