The 12th Invest in ME Conference, Part 1
OverTheHills presents the first article in a series of three about the recent 12th Invest In ME international Conference (IIMEC12) in London.
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Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: New Name Proposed; Old Cure Still Illegal 8/9/05 by Gary North

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS News' started by *GG*, Feb 11, 2015.

  1. *GG*

    *GG* Senior Member

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    Concord, NH
    http://www.garynorth.com/public/434.cfm
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 11, 2015
  2. Jon_Tradicionali

    Jon_Tradicionali Alone & Wandering

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    Zogor-Ndreaj, Shkodër, Albania
    What the hell did I just read?

    This reminds me much of the parasite "zapper" so famously marketed by Hulda Clarke which allegedly enabled patients (deluded wannabes patients also) to ZAP the parasites dead using this cricket-bat shaped electronic device.

    Desperation does make us do crazy things though.
     
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  3. *GG*

    *GG* Senior Member

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    Concord, NH
    Not sure what to make of this?

    GG
     
  4. satori

    satori

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    NJ
    Rife machine?
     
  5. valentinelynx

    valentinelynx Senior Member

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    Tucson
    "Black boxes" have become rampant in the alternative health world. Backed by mumbo jumbo "science" (which typically was done in what we used to call countries "behind the iron curtain." They purport to not only diagnose, but treat any disease or "allergy". The tend to use so-called "kinesiology" as the "basic science" behind their function, e.g. "testing" the patient's body's response to "toxins" or "pathogens" and then delivering the precisely calibrated treatment: either some radio frequency treatment or "conversion" of a neutral substance to a treatment by apply the right "vibrational frequencies."

    I do not understand how otherwise apparently intelligent physicians can be sold on these things. They are true "black boxes": could and probably do absolutely nothing. Sure they work on some people. Everything works on some people. The more $$ and pseudo-scientific explanation the greater the placebo power.

    I've no objection to people being healed by placebos. I'd happily pay $100,000 or more (if I had it) for any cure. Unfortunately, I'm not very good at responding to placebos. I just wish that doctors (and I include naturopaths) were more discerning in the treatments they support.

    I tend to be more open to well-established, if poorly understood, non-Western medical approaches. At least they involve the clinical acumen of practitioners with years of training, who actually examine and touch patients.

    My two cents.
     
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  6. Forbin

    Forbin Senior Member

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    Way back in 1969, there was a two part Hawaii-Five-0 episode that dealt with a "doctor" who was using an electronic black box to treat various diseases, including cancer. It was called "Once Upon A Time" and it can be found in a couple of different forms on youtube. Unusually for the show, it mostly took place in California, possibly because the episode wanted to highlight the limitations of the laws there. Here's a short clip of McGarrett and the "doctor"...

     
  7. snowathlete

    snowathlete

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    There's a reason it's called a black box. If it were transparent you'd notice it was empty.
     
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