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Chronic fatigue syndrome and the immune system: Where are we now?

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by hixxy, Apr 16, 2017.

  1. hixxy

    hixxy Senior Member

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    Neurophysiol Clin. 2017 Apr 11. pii: S0987-7053(17)30006-0. doi: 10.1016/j.neucli.2017.02.002.

    Chronic fatigue syndrome and the immune system: Where are we now?

    Mensah FKF, Bansal AS, Ford B, Cambridge G.

    Abstract
    Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is characterised by multiple symptoms including fatigue, headaches and cognitive impairment, which have a significantly adverse effect on the normal functioning and well-being of the individual. These symptoms are often triggered or worsened following physical or mental exertion. ME/CFS has long been thought of as having a significant immunological component, but reports describing changes in immune function are often inconsistent between study groups. Although the wide range of physical, neurocognitive and autonomic symptoms reported have seriously hampered attempts to understand pathophysiological pathways, investment in biomedical research in ME/CFS is finally increasing with a number of novel and promising investigations being published. The onset of ME/CFS may often be linked to (viral) infections which would be consistent with a variety of alterations in natural killer (NK) cell function as described by a number of different groups. Consistency in cytokine data has been lacking so far, although recently more sophisticated approaches have led to more robust data from large patient cohorts. New hope has also been given to sufferers with the possibility that therapies that deplete B cells can result in clinical improvement. To understand the pathogenic mechanism in this complex condition, it is important to consider repeated analysis in different cohorts. In this review, we will discuss the potential of different components of the immune system to be involved in the pathogenesis of ME/CFS.

    Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

    KEYWORDS:
    B cells; Biomedical research; Cellules B; Cellules NK; Cytokines; EM/SFC; Immune system; ME/CFS; NK cells; Recherche biomédicale; Système immunitaire

    PMID: 28410877
    DOI: 10.1016/j.neucli.2017.02.002
     
    Cohen2, justy, Joh and 14 others like this.
  2. Murph

    Murph :)

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    Are headaches characteristic of Me/cfs? I get headaches, sure, but they're not a signal symptom of ours that warrants second-top billing imo...
     
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  3. charles shepherd

    charles shepherd Senior Member

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    Immune system function in ME/CFS - new review (April 2017)

    New review of research findings relating to the role of the immune system in ME/CFS

    Abstract only available - full paper is not open access:

    Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is characterised by multiple symptoms including fatigue, headaches and cognitive impairment, which have a significantly adverse effect on the normal functioning and well-being of the individual.

    These symptoms are often triggered or worsened following physical or mental exertion.

    ME/CFS has long been thought of as having a significant immunological component, but reports describing changes in immune function are often inconsistent between study groups.

    Although the wide range of physical, neurocognitive and autonomic symptoms reported have seriously hampered attempts to understand pathophysiological pathways, investment in biomedical research in ME/CFS is finally increasing with a number of novel and promising investigations being published.

    The onset of ME/CFS may often be linked to (viral) infections which would be consistent with a variety of alterations in natural killer (NK) cell function as described by a number of different groups.

    Consistency in cytokine data has been lacking so far, although recently more sophisticated approaches have led to more robust data from large patient cohorts.

    New hope has also been given to sufferers with the possibility that therapies that deplete B cells can result in clinical improvement.

    To understand the pathogenic mechanism in this complex condition, it is important to consider repeated analysis in different cohorts. In this review, we will discuss the potential of different components of the immune system to be involved in the pathogenesis of ME/CFS.

    Pubmed link:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28410877
     
  4. CFS_for_19_years

    CFS_for_19_years Hoarder of biscuits

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  5. charles shepherd

    charles shepherd Senior Member

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    GreyOwl likes this.
  6. Persimmon

    Persimmon Senior Member

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    Full text:
    http://sci-hub.cc/saveme/b77e/10.1016@j.neucli.2017.02.002.pdf

    This article is a brief summary of the current state of immunological findings in ME/CFS. (It's not a comprehensive literature review.)

    As such, it is a handy document - much like the summary of research & hypotheses published by Jonathan Edwards, Simon McGrath et al. last year.
     
  7. Persimmon

    Persimmon Senior Member

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    OFF-TOPIC

    Hi Murph,
    Headaches used to be central to descriptions of ME. In the early outbreaks, headache was recorded as a dominant symptom.

    Typical example - the 1957 BMJ article about the Royal Free outbreak lists headaches as the most common symptom during the early stages of illness; and as a major problem for patients in the chronic stage.

    The most important figure in the history of ME, Melvin Ramsay, rated headaches as one its three cardinal symptoms.

    In contrast, headache is regarded as far less important in the CDC/NIH conceptualisation of CFS. Ditto the Wessely School view.

    Similarly, Lenny Jason doesn't perceive headaches to be a characterising symptom.
    Eg in his 1999 community-based sampling (Archives of Internal Medicine) Jason found headaches to be a problem for only 1/2 of CFS patients. 7 others symptoms ranked above it.

    Perhaps the prominence of headaches depends on which subset of patients you look at, and/or how you conceptualise ME or CFS or ME/CFS.
     
  8. Forbin

    Forbin Senior Member

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    Pain is, in general, a required symptom of the CCC, and headache is one of the types pain listed. In the press, the headache description is often condensed to "headaches of a new type."

    I certainly developed migraines for the first time shortly after onset, but, for me, they were only a significant feature of the disease in the first year.

     
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  9. lauluce

    lauluce as long as you manage to stay alive, there's hope

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    argentina
    Where can I find the "summary of research & hypotheses"? thanks!
     
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  10. Kina

    Kina

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    Please note there were two threads on this subject, so I have merged them.
     
  11. cfsStevew

    cfsStevew

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    has anyone got another lin for this full paper? one above doesnt appear to work...
     
  12. hixxy

    hixxy Senior Member

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  13. cfsStevew

    cfsStevew

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    mmm doesnt seem to work for me...just hangs...
     
  14. hixxy

    hixxy Senior Member

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  15. cfsStevew

    cfsStevew

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