1. Patients launch a $1.27 million crowdfunding campaign for ME/CFS gut microbiome study.
    Check out the website, Facebook and Twitter. Join in donate and spread the word!
Patient Experience: "What Bronllys taught me about pacing."
In 2012, Maya, who had tried to cope with ME/CFS on her own for many years, attended a pain management centre in Wales, U.K., and is now able to achieve more through pacing and acceptance, than she had been able to before the course...
Discuss the article on the Forums.

CFS Central - Q and (no) A with CDC SCIENTISTS

Discussion in 'Media, Interviews, Blogs, Talks, Events about XMRV' started by CBS, Jul 3, 2010.

  1. Mithriel

    Mithriel Senior Member

    Messages:
    563
    Likes:
    36
    Scotland
    Exactly right Tina

    Mithriel
  2. SOC

    SOC Moderator and Senior Member

    Messages:
    4,966
    Likes:
    5,514
    USA
    Exactly! We need a journalist with ME/CFS knowledge asking those questions. [hint, hint]
  3. Recovery Soon

    Recovery Soon Senior Member

    Messages:
    380
    Likes:
    36
    This was the best way to bury the NIH/FDA controversy- in the Friday news cycle- on a Holiday weekend.

    So, the WSJ articles, and the covers of Nature and Science, have now lost their all of their initial power.

    The flip side is the CDC also lost it's spark.
  4. leela

    leela Slow But Hopeful

    Messages:
    2,367
    Likes:
    2,689
    Couchland, USA
    I am amazed at how difficult it is for the medical establishment to recognize that circumstances, environment, personal history and constitution could easily account for the variables in the way each immune system attempts to deal with any illness. We are not lab rats raised in the same cage, fed the same diet, breathing the same air, living under the same fluorescent lighting rhythms, and exposed to exactly the same pathogens at precisely the same time.

    I personally would describe mine as Gradual Onset Via Multiple Acute Episodes. Which seems like the middle ground between two very real ways the human body responds to immunological overload.

    How many blows to the head does it take for a prizefighter to finally fall to the floor and incur brain damage? Was it that one blow? The whole series of blows in his lifetime? Or was that one blow the final straw in a long series of insults? No one can say for sure. The only thing that is for certain is that
    the brain damage has occurred, and it would probably be good to stop letting people punch you in the head.

    It is SO time for the political games to stop and to allow funding and research for all manifestations of this illness, no matter what it's called, how it came on, and which particular pathogens are present. The medical model that presumes every body reacts to the same illness the same way is illogical.
  5. Recovery Soon

    Recovery Soon Senior Member

    Messages:
    380
    Likes:
    36
    Yes- I had sudden onset- during a 2 mile run on a Sunday afternoon in the middle of September 2006 (how's that for specific?)- suddenly realized everyone was lapping me, strange because I was in peak physical condition- then realized I was coming down with the flu. The rest is history.

    To Tina's point- in hindsight, I now can recall that I was having immune problems prior to my "sudden onset" for maybe a year or so beforehand- which I didn't quite recognize as such.

    One example is that every time I would work out intensely I would get a sore throat afterwards. Also, I was getting colds a lot. I can recall having a "Cold Buster" Jamba Juice and large Chicken Noodle Soup for lunch maybe 4 or 5 times a month to combat something or other during that time. I would have forgotten all of this had I not recently recalled making a fleeting joke to my girlfriend at the time about my weak immune system (though, I didn't actually realize how weak it really was).

    So, I guess my take away message from all of this is that even "sudden onsets" likely have certain gradual precursors that we have likely forgotten about, unless we examine closer.

    Mikovitz's theory perfectly explains this whole process.

    I guess that Sunday on the track was my tipping point.
  6. usedtobeperkytina

    usedtobeperkytina Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,384
    Likes:
    185
    Clay, Alabama
    Is it me or is it them? It's them, right?

    Tina
  7. Forbin

    Forbin Forbin

    Messages:
    221
    Likes:
    171
    Here’s how...

    In early 1992, The Annals of Internal Medicine published a paper entitled “A Chronic Illness Characterized by Fatigue, Neurologic and Immunologic Disorders, and Active Human Herpesvirus Type 6 Infection.” The paper’s subjects were 259 victims of the Lake Tahoe outbreak of 1984.

    http://www.ncf-net.org/pdf/CFSAnnInternMed1992.pdf

    The paper’s authors included Dedra Buchwald, Paul Cheney Dan Peterson, Dharam V. Ablashi, Robert Gallo and Anthony Komaroff. In Osler’s Web, Hillary Johnson called it “the most exhaustive and medically sophisticated study of the disease ever undertaken.” The paper concluded that its subjects may have been “experiencing a chronic, immunologically mediated inflammatory process of the central nervous system.”

    Eight months later, in August 1992, the same publication printed a letter written by Bill Reeves (the CDC's then new CFS principal investigator) and two colleagues at the CDC entitled “The Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Controvesry.” In it they wrote:

    “We conclude that the disease Buchwald and co-workers described is not the chronic fatigue syndrome or any other entity.”

    So, by 1992 at the latest, the CDC had decided that CFS was not the illness seen in Lake Tahoe. They had also decided that the illness seen at Lake Tahoe...did not exist.
  8. glenp

    glenp "and this too shall pass"

    Messages:
    753
    Likes:
    16
    Vancouver Canada suburbs
    were some simply depressed?

    In the Switzer et al (2010) study on XMRV and CFS, one or more CFS patients scored 100 (out of 100) on the SF-36 physical functioning scale.

    That means they answered "No, not limited at all", to all of the questions below (the questions below are the questions for the physical functioning subscale: basically "Yes, Limited A Lot" gets you 0 points for that question; "Yes, Limited A Little" gets you 5 and "No, not limited at all" gets you 10 so scale is 0-100).

    Extract from Switzer et al (2010) study paper:
    SF-36 physical functioning 65.5, range 10-100
    This average score is higher than you generally see in CFS studies.

    Leonard Jason previously noted this problem in:
    5. Jason LA, Najar N, Porter N, Reh C. Evaluating the Centers for Disease Control's
    empirical chronic fatigue syndrome case definition. Journal of Disability Policy Studies
    2009;20;93.

    Leonard Jason et al gave an example of a woman with major depressive disorder who didn't have CFS satisfying the empiric criteria despite having a SF-36 PF score of 100

    SF-36 physical functioning questions

    4. The following items are about activities you might do during a typical day. Does your health now limit you in these activities? If so, how much?
    (check one on each line) ACTIVITIES

    Yes, Limited A Lot

    Yes, Limited A Little

    No, Not Limited At All

    a. Vigorous activities, such as running, lifting heavy objects, participating in strenuous sports
    1
    3
    5

    b. Moderate activities, such as moving a table, pushing a vacuum cleaner, bowling, or playing golf
    1
    3
    5

    c. Lifting or carrying groceries
    1
    3
    5

    d. Climbing several flights of stairs
    1
    3
    5

    e. Climbing one flight of stairs
    1
    3
    5

    f. Bending, kneeling, or stooping
    1
    3
    5

    g. Walking more than a mile
    1
    3
    5

    h. Walking several blocks
    1
    3
    5

    i. Walking one block
    1
    3
    5

    j. Bathing or dressing yourself
    1
    3
    5
  9. glenp

    glenp "and this too shall pass"

    Messages:
    753
    Likes:
    16
    Vancouver Canada suburbs
  10. usedtobeperkytina

    usedtobeperkytina Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,384
    Likes:
    185
    Clay, Alabama
    So, the Incline Village folks have a newly created diagnosis of CFS. And then they have hysteria (reported by Dateline as a comment from Reeves). Then they don't have CFS, with only a comment that they have chronic inflammation in CNS. And now they have a neurological condition, unnamed, that CDC isn't studying. So after investigators came out to Incline Village 25 years ago, they don't know what was in Incline Village. Can anyone who got the illness there tell me if they have been in any CDC study in the last 20 years.

    So is that their story?

    Tina
  11. Cort

    Cort Phoenix Rising Founder

    Messages:
    7,025
    Likes:
    428
    Raleigh, NC
    I'm trying to characterize type of onset and health at the time of onset for the Patient Data Repository program I'm setting up.
    http://www.forums.aboutmecfs.org/showwiki.php?title=Patient+Data+Repository+and+Treatment+Review+Project:Onset

    Right now it's something like this

    I had acute onset: I experienced a sudden dramatic decline in my health

    My health at the time was:

    • Excellent
    • good
    • fair
    • poor
    I had not experienced increasing levels of the symptoms associated with ME/CFS in the year prior to becoming ill
    I had experienced increasing levels of symptoms associated with ME/CFS in the year prior to coming ill

    I had gradual onset: I experience a gradual decline in my health over time
    This decline occurred over several


    • weeks
    • months
    • years
    Plus maybe
    When I was a child I experienced periods of unexplained and severe fatigue, poor concentration, postexertional malaise, unrefreshing sleep or muscle or joint pain

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page