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CFS: bacterium probiotic modulates host inflammatory processes beyond the gut

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by Simon, Jul 14, 2013.

  1. Simon

    Simon

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    Monmouth, UK
    The role of gut bacteria in illness and health is all the rage, and this new study suggests they may play a role in CFS.

    Bifidobacterium infantis 35624 modulates host inflammatory processes beyond the gut (2013, free full text)

    [​IMG] David Groeger, Liam O’Mahony, Eileen F. Murphy, John F. Bourke, Timothy G. Dinan, Barry Kiely, Fergus Shanahan, * Eamonn M.M. Quigley

    Abstract:

    Certain therapeutic microbes, including Bifidobacteria infantis (B. infantis) 35624 exert beneficial immunoregulatory effects by mimicking commensal-immune interactions; however, the value of these effects in patients with non-gastrointestinal inflammatory conditions remains unclear.

    In this study, we assessed the impact of oral administration of B. infantis 35624, for 6‒8 weeks on inflammatory biomarker and plasma cytokine levels in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) (n = 22), chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) (n = 48) and psoriasis (n = 26) in three separate randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled interventions. Additionally, the effect of B. infantis 35624 on immunological biomarkers in healthy subjects (n = 22) was assessed.

    Results
    At baseline, both gastrointestinal (UC) and non-gastrointestinal (CFS and psoriasis) patients had significantly increased plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) compared with healthy volunteers.

    B. infantis 35624 feeding resulted in reduced plasma CRP levels in all three inflammatory disorders compared with placebo. Interestingly, plasma TNF-α was reduced in CFS and psoriasis while IL-6 was reduced in UC and CFS.

    Furthermore, in healthy subjects, LPS-stimulated TNF-α and IL-6 secretion by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was significantly reduced in the B. infantis 35624-treated groups compared with placebo following eight weeks of feeding.

    Conclusion
    These results demonstrate the ability of this microbe to reduce systemic pro-inflammatory biomarkers in both gastrointestinal and non-gastrointestinal conditions. In conclusion, these data show that the immunomodulatory effects of the microbiota in humans are not limited to the mucosal immune system but extend to the systemic immune system.


    My comments
    C-reactive protein is a very general marker of inflammation and doesn't seem to have been studied much in CFS (juding by a quick google). Eg this study found C-reactive protein was higher in CFS than healthy controls, and this study found the same, but also found no difference in C-reactive protein between CFS and chronically fatigued patients. Elsewhere, alex3619 has pointed out that the immune changes didn't correlate with symptom scores. Still, interesting stuff.
     
  2. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6

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    Cornwall, UK
    Good stuff, Simon - thanks. Just had a quick look at the full text and noticed that the CFS selection criteria included "neuropsychological symptomatology" but "the exclusion of associated medical and psychiatric conditions." I wonder what are considered "associated medical and psychiatric conditions." They also say "Each potentially eligible patient was evaluated by a full review of clinical history, physical examination, full blood count and routine biochemistry analysis. Subjects with any clinically significant abnormalities in any of these tests were excluded from the study." That would exclude quite a lot of us, perhaps.

    It would have been good to follow the patients for longer to see if their symptoms improved and whether the inflammatory improvement persisted. I note that they say "In general, reduction in inflammatory markers, such as those seen in this study would be regarded as indicative of
    clinical remission and of a lower risk of relapse."
     
    Esther12 likes this.
  3. RustyJ

    RustyJ Contaminated Cell Line 'RustyJ'

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    There are conflicting interests involved in this study:
    Alimentary Health appears to be linked to the probiotic Align which is involved in a controversy about false claims: P&G Gets Probiotic False Ad Action Pared - Law360

    This doesn't of course mean Align won't do what they say it will, however it pays to be aware of who pays the bills for the research. Unless full data is available, then the results of this study must be considered under caution..
     
    Simon and Esther12 like this.
  4. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6

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    Well spotted, RustyJ. After checking out your link I wondered what the relationship was between Alimentary Health and P&G so did a quick search and found this:

    http://www.norgine.com/downloads/pr_archive/Norgine and AH Corporate Press Release 240811.pdf
     
  5. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    Here's the full extract:
    Sounds like a reasonably standard way that the Fukuda et al. (1994) criteria are used.
     
  6. MeSci

    MeSci ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6

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    I don't think that Fukuda is very well-regarded by ME patients in the know. Also, do a lot of us not have "clinically significant abnormalities" in "full blood count and routine biochemistry analysis"?
     
  7. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    My point wasn't to recommend it but to clarify which criteria were used, which wasn't clear from your post it seemed to me. Maybe 90% of the research in the field has used it in the last 15-18 years (with a lot of the rest using the Oxford criteria).
     
    Firestormm likes this.
  8. Waverunner

    Waverunner Senior Member

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    Align was the only probiotic that helped me in the past and you can read my old posts about it. I tried it the first time in 2010 and I really don't care what many alternative sites claim. P&G developed it and I'm thankful. The other companies always use the same old strains, mix them together, so that even pro inflammatory probiotics are contained and sell them as great probiotic without even providing one single study.
     
  9. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

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    I'm not sure that we do (although I'm not saying some people aren't unnecessarily removed)? Which tests are you thinking about? What they are thinking of are the sort of bog-standard tests GPs run.
     

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