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CDC Caught Hiding Data Showing Mercury In Vaccines Linked to Autism

Discussion in 'Action Alerts and Advocacy' started by caledonia, Mar 3, 2014.

  1. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    But vaccines are not like any other medication, because there is an ethical problem involved, at the societal level.

    The ethical problem with vaccines is that in many cases, the best policy for a self-interested individual is not to get a vaccination, provided that most other people do get the vaccination.

    The selfish individual will let other people take the small risk associated with getting their shots in order to provide herd immunity; but that individual will avoid getting a vaccination themselves, so as to avoid the small risk of an adverse reaction. However, if all individuals adopted this approach, obviously herd immunity would disappear, and nobody would be protected from the infectious agent, and that agent may thus run rife through the community.

    This situation is similar to a tragedy of the commons state of affairs, where individuals acting independently and rationally according to their personal self-interest actually en masse work against the best interests of society, and thus ultimately against themselves.


    Though note that the above is only true of vaccines for contagious diseases that spread among the human poulation. For non-contagious infectious diseases like tetanus (which you can contract when the bacterium Clostridium tetani, found in the soil or house dust, gets into a cut on your skin), if you skip the vaccination, the only person who is affected is you.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2014
    Tristen likes this.
  2. Ema

    Ema Senior Member

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    I think part of the problem is the sheer number of vaccines recommended now.

    According to the CDC website and my estimated count, in 1983 (the earliest year closest to my birth), 5 vaccines were recommended.

    In 2013, they list 14.

    So if this strategy was working, we should be much healthier instead of having an epidemic of autoimmune and other immune related diseases.

    I'm sure there are other factors in play as well but I just don't see it working as well as it seems it should.
     
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  3. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    @Ema
    This Wikipedia article details the infectious agents linked to autoimmune disorders:
    This makes me think that the most likely explanation for the rise in autoimmune disorders is perhaps new strains of enteroviruses entering circulation, especially since globalization facilitates the spread of pathogens around the world.

    And interestingly enough, vaccines are not yet available for any of the above pathogens (except Mycobacterium tuberculosis), so there is no vaccine protection against these major autoimmunity causing pathogens.

    I am not saying that vaccines cannot be responsible for precipitating chronic disease. Indeed, Dr Chia estimates that around 1.5% of the ME/CFS cases he sees appear to be vaccine triggered (ref: here).
     
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  4. Ema

    Ema Senior Member

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    I think we are both right!

    Infections overwhelm the body's ability to respond properly, no matter where the immune assault arises or what the pathogens are. It could easily be enteroviruses too along with all the other common infections seen in our population.

    "T-cells, commonly called killer cells, are a type of lymphocyte (white blood cell). They are a critical part of the immune system. CD4+ cells are a type of T-cell. They initiate the body’s response to infections. The study found that overstimulation of CD4+ cells results in the induction of autoantibodies, that is, antibodies that attack the self instead of invaders. That is virtually the definition of an autoimmune disease.

    The authors specifically found tissue injury like that of the disease lupus erythematosus and other autoimmune disorders.

    The researchers used Staphylococcus entertoxin B (SEB) to inject mice bred for their lack of autoimmunity. Injection initially resulted in loss of energy in a particular kind of CD4+ cell, Vβ8+. These cells recovered through 7 cycles of injections. However, the Vβ8+ cells were unable to recover after the 8th injection. At that point, they started to produce the autoantibodies."

    http://gaia-health.com/gaia-blog/20...vitably-cause-autoimmune-diseases-plos-study/
     
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  5. JPV

    JPV Senior Member

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    Greater good? More like corporate profit.
     
  6. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Senior Member

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    This hits close to home for me because all of my ill health started directly after an oral polio vaccination...

    Tired on Friday night, couldn't stand up on Sunday. It was that fast...
     
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  7. WillowJ

    WillowJ Senior Member

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    you totally missed my "but" where I mentioned that the benefit:risk calculation should be different for precisely that reason.

    I also mentioned tetanus as you did (noting that it is typically considered just as "evil" to skip tetanus as any other vaccine, simply because it is in the class of vaccines), but that may have been an edit you might have missed.
     
  8. golden

    golden Senior Member

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  9. biophile

    biophile Places I'd rather be.

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    I agree with Hip about the importance of herd immunity. I just wish that *if* certain vaccines do pose a risk, these are acknowledged and researched, not leaving the affected with a lifetime of suffering under a cloak of mystery and denial.
     
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  10. snowathlete

    snowathlete

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    Well indeed, can governmemt people be trusted to make decisions for others with other influences acting upon them? Probably not.
     
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  11. Kina

    Kina Moderation Team Lead

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    My mother used to be a politician -- she didn't strike me as untrustworthy re: being a 'government people' and all. :rofl:
     
  12. PennyIA

    PennyIA Senior Member

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    I agree... research and see what parts of which vaccines are related to the greater risks and identify if there are effective alternatives. Around here? If you ask for a thermisol free vaccine? They often look at you like you've sprouted a second head. And OBVIOUSLY you must know nothing because low levels of mercury are safe, so it's silly to ask for an alternative. But it shouldn't be that folks are automatically put in pro-vaccine camp and anti-vaccine camp. And you're evil if you land in the second camp. There should be an ability to speak out about safety and risks and ask for research that helps identify improvements. Asking for improvements doesn't make someone anti-vaccine.
     
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  13. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    That is a very interesting study you quoted, Ema.

    I certainly would want there to be follow up research on this. If eight repeated injections of Staphylococcus entertoxin B can lead to autoimmunity in mice, there remains the possibility that perhaps in certain susceptible people, autoimmunity might emerge after just one injection.

    However, it would have been better if they tried a range of different vaccinations, not just a toxoid type vaccine. Staphylococcus entertoxin B is a superantigen, and a superantigen activates a large number of T-cells and generates a massive immune response. So Staphylococcus entertoxin B is a very specific type of vaccination, and the study results may thus not apply to other types of vaccines

    Interestingly, another Staphylococcus toxoid vaccine, containing the Staphylococcus alpha toxin, when taken repeatedly (once every 6 months), is a pretty good treatment for ME/CFS.

    Unfortunately, there does not seem to be anyone who currently makes the Staphylococcus alpha toxin vaccine. The existing manufacturer had to cease production when government rules forced it to remove the mercury, and the manufacturer could not afford to develop a mercury-free version. So here is one situation where the public's fear of mercury in vaccines has resulted in the loss of a good treatment for ME/CFS.
     
  14. Ema

    Ema Senior Member

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    Looks like they tried more antigens here:

    http://www.med.kobe-u.ac.jp/journal/contents/59/E64.pdf

    Does anyone outside of the USA make the Staph A toxin vaccine anymore?

    ETA: I see that this last question is addressed on the linked thread...
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2014
  15. golden

    golden Senior Member

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    Last edited: Mar 5, 2014
  16. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    I searched high and low for a manufacturer of Staphylococcus alpha toxin vaccine, but found nothing anywhere in the world. Professor Gottfries in Sweden, who is a ME/CFS-sufferer himself, stockpiled the vaccine for his own use just before the manufacturer ceased production. You only need to take this vaccine once every 6 months. Quite a few ME/CFS patients in Sweden got a lot better from taking this vaccine.

    The manufacturer says it needs $900,000 to develop a new Staphylococcus alpha toxin vaccine. Some ME/CFS patients in Sweden are talking about raising this money, in order to get this vaccine back into production (see the discussion here).
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2014
  17. Iquitos

    Iquitos Senior Member

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    And this is really what Andrew Wakefield said in his study, which has been mischaractorized as "anti-vax", resulting in his political assassination by the medical establishment in UK, thanks to BigPharma influence.

    He only said that the mercury MAY have an adverse affect and went on to say that probably the huge number of vaccinations, many in combinations of 4-6 different ones, given to babies too young when their immune systems haven't had a chance to develop before they are overwhelmed with too many vaccines too soon. He suggested more research into these questions. That got him targeted by PigPharma.
     
  18. snowathlete

    snowathlete

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    Sorry, I didn't mean to give the impression that I thought every person working in government is untrustworthy. What I meant was that those who are corruptable and who are in those positions are likely to allow other factors to influence their decisions. My view is that the only people who should be making the decision are the individuals themselves, and they should be able to do so on the basis of informed consent, not having been only partially informed, or worse, misled.
     

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