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CBT survey (UK only)

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS Discussion' started by charles shepherd, Feb 10, 2016.

  1. charles shepherd

    charles shepherd Senior Member

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    Student Survey on CBT

    If you want to take part in this student survey on CBT please use the link on the MEA website home page:

    http://www.meassociation.org.uk/201...py-as-a-tool-to-manage-mecfs-9-february-2016/

    And please read what Pippa has to say before plunging in and criticising what she is doing!

    Please take part in student survey on use of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy as a tool to manage ME/CFS | 9 February 2016

    Pippa Stacey, who is taking a BSc in Psychology in Education at the University of York, has asked us to publicise her survey on the use Cognitive Behaviour Therapy as a tool in the management of ME/CFS. If you would like to take part, please read her request below.

    Pippa writes:

    I am looking for participants with ME/CFS to take part in a research questionnaire for my university dissertation. The questionnaire can be accessed on both computer and mobile devices, and should take no longer than 25 minutes to complete. You can also save your responses partway through to return to later, should you need to take a break. The results from this study may be used in future research but your responses will be kept anonymous throughout the study, so that you cannot be identified from your individual answers.

    The purpose of the study is to examine the use of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) in the management of ME/CFS. The questionnaire aims to investigate the opinions of patients towards CBT, and also how these opinions differ according to factors such as age, location, occupational status and more. If you have had CBT in the past, you will also be invited to share your experiences.

    Though this research is for a psychology dissertation and focuses on a psychological management approach, the research will in no way imply that ME/CFS is a psychological condition. As an ME/CFS sufferer myself, I aim to critically evaluate the use of CBT and question the way it is delivered in this debilitating physical condition.

    If you have any concerns or questions about this research prior to completing the questionnaire, please feel free to contact me at PLS504@york.ac.uk.


    MEA position on CBT - from our 2015 Report on CBT, GET and Pacing:

    http://www.meassociation.org.uk/how-you-can-help/introduction-to-our-cbt-get-and-pacing-report/

    CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
    Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)

    We conclude that CBT in its current delivered form should not be recommended as a primary intervention for people with ME/CFS.

    CBT courses based on the model that abnormal beliefs and behaviours are responsible for maintaining the illness, have no role to play in the management of ME/CFS and increase the risk of symptoms becoming worse. The belief of some CBT practitioners that ME/CFS is a psychological illness was the main factor which led to less symptoms improving, less courses being appropriate to needs, more symptoms becoming worse and more courses being seen as inappropriate.

    Our results indicate that graded exercise therapy should form no part of any activity management advice employed in the delivery of CBT, as this also led to a negative impact on outcomes.

    There is a clear need for better training among practitioners. The data indicates that lack of knowledge and experience had a direct effect on outcomes and remained a key factor, even where courses were held in specialist clinics or elsewhere given by therapists with an ME/CFS specialism.

    However, our results did indicate that, when used appropriately, the practical coping component of CBT can have a positive effect in helping some patients come to terms with their diagnosis and adapt their lives to best accommodate it.

    CBT was also seen to have a positive effect in helping some patients deal with comorbid issues – anxiety, depression, stress – which may occur at any time for someone with a long-term disabling illness.

    An appropriate model of CBT – one that helps patients learn practical coping skills and/or manage co-morbid issues such as those listed above – could be employed, where appropriate, for ME/CFS as it is for other chronic physical illnesses such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, cancer, heart disease, and arthritis and we recommend all patients should have access to such courses as well as access to follow-up courses and/or consultations as and when required.
     
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  2. Mrs Sowester

    Mrs Sowester Senior Member

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    I did this, it gives a lot of opportunity to provide one's own opinion - so thought it was pretty good.
     
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  3. Old Bones

    Old Bones Senior Member

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    It appears this survey is intended to be completed only by those living in the UK. Is this correct? I started to complete it, but some of the questions I couldn't answer (eg. location and education) because none of the options applied to my situation. I abandoned it at that point, not knowing if the survey would allow me to leave some questions blank.
     
    Valentijn likes this.
  4. Sasha

    Sasha Fine, thank you

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    @charles shepherd?

    If it's UK only, maybe you could amend the thread title.
     
  5. charles shepherd

    charles shepherd Senior Member

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    Mea culpa - sorted!
     
    Sasha likes this.
  6. eafw

    eafw Senior Member

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    Read the description, did the survey.

    Age categories are skewed heavily to a younger population, cut off for oldest is 42+ (!!) with four categories for 20 to 40. Surely a split at 52+ would make more sense as menopause is a significant factor for health-related issues (and the way we are treated by Drs), and again post 70 as general health can decline again then. Similarly, in employment categories, if you are retired (ie 15 to 20%) of the population, or self-employed (about 15%) you have to type in the "other" box.

    Qs regarding CBT, only option is for individual or group (nothing for both or for more than one course, or for the level of pressure exerted to push people into this, or even who made the referral)

    Qs regarding mental health diagnosis - needs to have explicit option for misdiagnosis, and for problems arising AFTER being long-term mistreated for years on end.

    And, despite claiming to "investigate" our opinions, there is very little in there that gathers information on that. Asks if CBT made things better or worse and if it would be recommended to others. That's it.

    Why, oh why, oh why don't these "researchers" take the simple step of asking us (their objects of study, and people with decades of experience of this stuff) for feedback on a draft version FIRST, rather than churning out another of these ridiculous surveys and expecting us to be all happy about it ?
     
    Valentijn likes this.
  7. Scarecrow

    Scarecrow Annie Gsampel

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    It's for someone's undergraduate degree. They are a student and are in a learning process.
     
    Mrs Sowester likes this.
  8. eafw

    eafw Senior Member

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    A very important part of which is seeking out and listening to people who know more about a subject than they do.
     

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