Phoenix Rising tells QMUL: release the PACE trial data
Mark Berry, Acting CEO of Phoenix Rising, presents the Board of Directors’ open letter to Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) urging them to release the PACE trial data, and hopes that other non-UK organisations will join British charities in the same request...
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Catch-22 (almost): Exercise programs and disability insurance companies

Discussion in 'Action Alerts and Advocacy' started by Dolphin, Nov 19, 2011.

  1. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,681
    Likes:
    28,209
    Some of you may have heard of cases where disability insurance companies (i.e. the type that pay you an income if you become unable to work) have said they wouldn't give a payment until somebody had done the evidence-based treatments of graded exercise therapy (GET) and/or cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT).

    I heard indirectly an interesting twist on this recently: the insurance company said as the the person was able to do an exercise program*, it suggested the person was able to work!

    In this particular case, the person has a professional desk job, and has cognitive difficulties which they feel makes it impossible for them to work.

    * this person was doing quite a lot - 40 minutes at a go - although it is unclear if they are really able to do this amount or pushing themselves too hard.
     
  2. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

    Messages:
    8,449
    Likes:
    28,523
    I know someone who was working at the Citizens Advice Bureau, and had a client who was being told by Unum that they were only eligible for a six month pay out, as if they genuinely wanted to return to work and followed a CBT/GET programme, then it would only take them six month to be able to return to work (based on their 'medical expert''s assessment).

    This was years back, when I knew less about CFS and the politics that surrounded it, but I wish I'd got more details, or encouraged them to get in contact with a CFS charity. Getting more evidence of these sorts of things in to the public sphere would be helpful for showing how the way in which CBT/GET is promoted can be harmful to patients.
     
    Dolphin likes this.
  3. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,681
    Likes:
    28,209
    That's interesting.

    http://forums.phoenixrising.me/show...raft-NICE-guidelines-insight-into-their-views

    It reminded me of these comments:

    St Bartholomew's Hospital Chronic Fatigue Services submission on draft NICE guidelines:

    and
    i.e. only willing to give a disablility support for a limited period, whether it is an aid or a payment.

    Also:

    If one of the goals is recovery, and goals shouldn't take years only months, then recovery in months (not years) should be seen as a goal.
     
  4. Esther12

    Esther12 Senior Member

    Messages:
    8,449
    Likes:
    28,523
    Yeah - looking back, it could have been great evidence of the way these views are being applied upon patients... but I don't think there's any way I could get in contact with the patient now.
     
  5. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,681
    Likes:
    28,209
    Yes, understand.
     
  6. gu3vara

    gu3vara Senior Member

    Messages:
    339
    Likes:
    51
    I was asked to do a rehabilitation program by the insurance, it was a total fiasco. Stopped after a bit more than 2 months, left me way sicker and it took me a couple months to return to baseline after that.

    Only good thing is that the rehab experts concluded that I was still unable to work at the end of the program. When the insurance decided to stop paying for it and made me saw an expert rheumy paid to say I had nothing. The insurance haven't paid me in more than a year now, but this file from the the rehab program will certainly help when lawyers will look at this.

    Whole lot of sticking crap it is anyway, at least my wife is working... I hope that the truth will win eventually.

    Anyway, it was really painful and traumatic for me but I don't regret going to this program, at least they could see how bad I was.
     
  7. Dolphin

    Dolphin Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,681
    Likes:
    28,209
    Best of luck with it, gu3vara.
    I know somebody who did a program supervised by a physiotherapist (=physical therapist) who the insurance company commissioned (she was just local and not generally associated with them as far as I know).
    He went to the local gym to meet her for over a year. Eventually she said it wasn't working. However, her report wasn't that clear at all - I can't remember the details but know he wasn't happy with it.
     
  8. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,528
    Likes:
    35,242
    Logan, Queensland, Australia
    In 1987 I applied for workers compensation insurance due to ongoing problems with work. I found a physiotherapy program that was supposed to help - it made me worse over the next year, despite that it was a very slow and steady approach. Sometime along that timeline I saw a rheumatologist who said I just needed to exercise, case closed. He was appointed and paid for by the state workers compensation department. He was also wrong on everything he said, and I mean everything, although it was years before my understanding progressed. For example, he completely misunderstood exclusion criteria for CFS under Holmes definition.

    I have not worked full time from that time, although I did some part time work up till maybe 1995. My workers compensation claim was denied, and the muscle pain I had did not start to fade till the early 2000s. Its still there if I try to do too much.

    This is an old story. It has been going on for decades. Its a victory for power over people, dogma over knowledge, and injustice over justice.

    Bye
    Alex
     

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page