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Carbon Nanotubes Found In Lungs Of French Children

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by antares4141, Oct 26, 2015.

  1. antares4141

    antares4141 Senior Member

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    Truth or consequences, nm
  2. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    There are no surprises in this finding. However I wonder if it winds up causing massive disease burdens through society, who is going to pay for it?
     
  3. Gingergrrl

    Gingergrrl Senior Member

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    How would this relate to inhaling toxic mold into a persons lungs?

    Or other chemicals from working and living in a sick building?
     
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  4. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Its long been known that small particles from car exhausts and other carbon fires can go deep into the lungs. My guess is that they will weaken the lungs and make you more susceptible to other things.
     
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  5. antares4141

    antares4141 Senior Member

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    Article didn't seem to be clear on how the children were exposed. It intimated car exhaust. Shows how much I know about nanotubes. I thought they were a very specialized material that wasn't used very much commercially because it was still in the experimental phase of research. Amazing though. I clipped this out of wiki:
    snip>
    The toxicity of carbon nanotubes has been an important question in nanotechnology. As of 2007, such research had just begun. The data is still fragmentary and subject to criticism. Preliminary results highlight the difficulties in evaluating the toxicity of this heterogeneous material. Parameters such as structure, size distribution, surface area, surface chemistry, surface charge, and agglomeration state as well as purity of the samples, have considerable impact on the reactivity of carbon nanotubes. However, available data clearly show that, under some conditions, nanotubes can cross membrane barriers, which suggests that, if raw materials reach the organs, they can induce harmful effects such as inflammatory and fibrotic reactions.[72][73]

    Under certain conditions CNTs can enter human cells and accumulate in the cytoplasm, causing cell death.[74]

    Results of rodent studies collectively show that regardless of the process by which CNTs were synthesized and the types and amounts of metals they contained, CNTs were capable of producing inflammation, epithelioid granulomas (microscopic nodules), fibrosis, and biochemical/toxicological changes in the lungs.[75] Comparative toxicity studies in which mice were given equal weights of test materials showed that SWCNTs were more toxic than quartz, which is considered a serious occupational health hazard when chronically inhaled. As a control, ultrafine carbon black was shown to produce minimal lung responses.[76]

    Carbon nanotubes deposit in the alveolar ducts by aligning lengthwise with the airways; the nanotubes will often combine with metals.[77] The needle-like fiber shape of CNTs is similar to asbestos fibers. This raises the idea that widespread use of carbon nanotubes may lead to pleural mesothelioma, a cancer of the lining of the lungs, or peritoneal mesothelioma, a cancer of the lining of the abdomen (both caused by exposure to asbestos). A recently published pilot study supports this prediction.[78] Scientists exposed the mesothelial lining of the body cavity of mice to long multiwalled carbon nanotubes and observed asbestos-like, length-dependent, pathogenic behavior that included inflammation and formation of lesions known as granulomas. Authors of the study conclude:

    This is of considerable importance, because research and business communities continue to invest heavily in carbon nanotubes for a wide range of products under the assumption that they are no more hazardous than graphite. Our results suggest the need for further research and great caution before introducing such products into the market if long-term harm is to be avoided.[78]





     
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  6. lauluce

    lauluce as long as you manage to stay alive, there's hope

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    well, isn´t that obvious? US!
     
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  7. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    ME was around long before carbon nanofibers were common, I think. I am not sure about the natural production of them, I have never investigated it. However it cannot be ruled out they will make things worse for many, and not just people with CFS or ME.
     
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